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Why so much?

Posted by Pauline on 9/15/01 at 07:29 (060424)

I'm beginning to ask myself why so much P.F. and TTS? Why so much foot surgery? What combination of things is setting people up for foot problems? Is there an increase in foot problems in households where two individuals work? What about if one stays home? What occupations are void of foot problems if any? Are there less foot problems in countries where people walk more than ride? Are there early warning signals we don't pay attention to? Why does one foot surgery seeming lead to another? Is there a way to stop the round robin effect? What about cultures that never wear shoes? Are there cultures that are completly void of foot problems and is there a way to put all the puzzle parts together? Any ideas welcome.

Re: Why so much?

John h on 9/15/01 at 08:47 (060425)

Pauline: there are an estimated 9 million new cases pf Pf each year. With that many cases there is going to be a whole lot of surgery going on, I think in the last 50 years women's shoe styles have contributed. We have a lot more women in athletics and running every day. More women are in the work force and are postwomen, policewomen, factory workers, laborers and everything else. they abuse their feet more. women still lead the parade in PF just look at our board. Men are also running more, climbing mountains skiing, or whatever. At the same time we have gained weight as a nation. The condition is being diagnosed more because of access to doctors. In years past you just had feet that hurt and Poditrist were called Chiropodisit.

Re: other cultures, and hidden infection, contagions

alan k on 9/15/01 at 23:15 (060520)

As a professional anthropologist, even a doctor (but merely a Ph.D.), I can tell you that our feet were definitely not designed by evolution to wear shoes and walk around on hard flat surfaces. A baby is born with an amazing ability to manipulate their feet and toes (or rather, quickly develops this). Most of us lose this by putting our feet in prison and giving them a life sentence of hard labor. We are evolved from tree climbers who used their feet to grasp branches and trunks (which is to not to say that our feet are still the same as theirs). However, some people still develop or retain the ability to grasp trunks with their feet and others with no hands learn to eat and even write with their feet.

There is no question in my mind there are far less instances of PF in the countryside in Thailand and hardly any TTS (though that might be the same as US-- too rare for me to make a comparison). People grow up going barefoot, and continue to go barefoot indoors for their whole life. Only a small portion continue to climb trees past childhood, usually for coconuts. Actually in my childhood we climbed trees more than I see children doing here, though we did it in sneakers.

But I think mechanical problems are only part of the issue. I too have this uncanny sense that there is something going on here, making a simple injury so hard to heal. In my case, I know for a fact that it is so. I got foot pain immediately on arrival of a contagious cold or flu, and it went on for two and a half years. Other slight mechanical problems also turned into chronic pain in this long period. One week after my foot pain and flu, my wife got foot pain and flu. We were both fit, health conscious, relaxed and calm people. Her feet are completely different looking than mine (flatter and squatter), and she grew up barefoot.

There is in some medical circles talk about 'hidden infections' that slow the healing process but are virtually indectable, and there is no definite knowledge of what contagious agents that cause arthritic symptoms exist. They may be able to recognize some (rheumatologists would know the most), but you can't say that other ones don't exist.

That's my story and I'm sticking with it. I believe many of you, like me, may have some disruption in immune functioning (not necessarily low immunity) that is making you mechanical problem difficult to resolve.

I know there are some that claim it is only mechanical, or only immune, and they have the true 'underlying cause.' Their products may work, but that doesn't mean there is a single cause. Take their enthusiasm in stride, is my advice.

Last punctuation point: my wife's symptoms resolved after a few months, and mine after two and a half years (or at least at 0-1 discomfort level, with no sharp pain ever). Either way, there is light at the end of the tunnel. After first being very sad about it, I acquired a good attitude. But even that good attitude really deep down did not understand or believe that there is light at the end. It all looks so different from where I am now, looking back. And I have seen it happen with so many 'old-timers' on this board, whose condition seemed so hopeless for so long. You will be better too!

alan k

ps by 'you' I don't mean pauline, who is of course one of those who are better now.

Re: other cultures, and hidden infection, contagions

nancy s. on 9/16/01 at 00:16 (060526)

fascinating, alan. your anthropological perspective is missed on this board. i still remember fondly your post titled If Only We Had Hooves, way back in early 2000. more than once i've suggested that certain posters/seekers search it out.
nancy

Re: other cultures, and hidden infection, contagions

johnh on 9/16/01 at 10:25 (060569)

allan: i posted last year or longer that having spent two years in Thailand i never heard once of a case of PF. As you know the Thais can squat flat footed and do so for hours on end. It is hard for me to do it for 5 minutes. In the countrysides they go barefooted and you do not see many overweight Thais. By squatting flat footed they are surely stretching the calves and hams and their achilles tendons just have to be loose as a goose. I have always thought our lifestyle and shoe wear were a major reason for an estimated 9 million new cases of PF each year.

Re: other cultures, and hidden infection, contagions

BrianJ on 9/16/01 at 10:29 (060571)

Interesting post, Alan. Have you read some of the old posts from 'Gordon,' and do you believe that digestive issues/yeast overgrowth may be part of the problem?

Re: To Alan

Pauline on 9/16/01 at 16:31 (060602)

Alan,
I truly enjoyed your prospective. We need more of your insight on the board. I hope you will increase your posting when you have the time.

Re: other cultures, and hidden infection, contagions

john h on 9/16/01 at 16:40 (060604)

nancy dear: you can bet there are probably a couple who do have hooves and horns.

Re: other cultures, and hidden infection, contagions

alan k on 9/19/01 at 02:25 (060917)

In fact yes, gordon was a bit before my time but I was very excited at the time about anti-yeast dieting. I even felt a reaction in the first days to the diet (increased symptoms) as was said to be expected according to the theory. I could not maintain the diet perfectly however, though I do believe I did get a reduction in symptoms eventually from it. I would have to look up my old posts to be sure.

It is worth a try for others, if a doctor approves.

Most therapeutic diets require a tremendous amount of research and energy chasing around ingredients. etc.,if they are to be safe in the long run. Short run can usually meet your doctor's approval.

alan k

Re: Why so much?

John h on 9/15/01 at 08:47 (060425)

Pauline: there are an estimated 9 million new cases pf Pf each year. With that many cases there is going to be a whole lot of surgery going on, I think in the last 50 years women's shoe styles have contributed. We have a lot more women in athletics and running every day. More women are in the work force and are postwomen, policewomen, factory workers, laborers and everything else. they abuse their feet more. women still lead the parade in PF just look at our board. Men are also running more, climbing mountains skiing, or whatever. At the same time we have gained weight as a nation. The condition is being diagnosed more because of access to doctors. In years past you just had feet that hurt and Poditrist were called Chiropodisit.

Re: other cultures, and hidden infection, contagions

alan k on 9/15/01 at 23:15 (060520)

As a professional anthropologist, even a doctor (but merely a Ph.D.), I can tell you that our feet were definitely not designed by evolution to wear shoes and walk around on hard flat surfaces. A baby is born with an amazing ability to manipulate their feet and toes (or rather, quickly develops this). Most of us lose this by putting our feet in prison and giving them a life sentence of hard labor. We are evolved from tree climbers who used their feet to grasp branches and trunks (which is to not to say that our feet are still the same as theirs). However, some people still develop or retain the ability to grasp trunks with their feet and others with no hands learn to eat and even write with their feet.

There is no question in my mind there are far less instances of PF in the countryside in Thailand and hardly any TTS (though that might be the same as US-- too rare for me to make a comparison). People grow up going barefoot, and continue to go barefoot indoors for their whole life. Only a small portion continue to climb trees past childhood, usually for coconuts. Actually in my childhood we climbed trees more than I see children doing here, though we did it in sneakers.

But I think mechanical problems are only part of the issue. I too have this uncanny sense that there is something going on here, making a simple injury so hard to heal. In my case, I know for a fact that it is so. I got foot pain immediately on arrival of a contagious cold or flu, and it went on for two and a half years. Other slight mechanical problems also turned into chronic pain in this long period. One week after my foot pain and flu, my wife got foot pain and flu. We were both fit, health conscious, relaxed and calm people. Her feet are completely different looking than mine (flatter and squatter), and she grew up barefoot.

There is in some medical circles talk about 'hidden infections' that slow the healing process but are virtually indectable, and there is no definite knowledge of what contagious agents that cause arthritic symptoms exist. They may be able to recognize some (rheumatologists would know the most), but you can't say that other ones don't exist.

That's my story and I'm sticking with it. I believe many of you, like me, may have some disruption in immune functioning (not necessarily low immunity) that is making you mechanical problem difficult to resolve.

I know there are some that claim it is only mechanical, or only immune, and they have the true 'underlying cause.' Their products may work, but that doesn't mean there is a single cause. Take their enthusiasm in stride, is my advice.

Last punctuation point: my wife's symptoms resolved after a few months, and mine after two and a half years (or at least at 0-1 discomfort level, with no sharp pain ever). Either way, there is light at the end of the tunnel. After first being very sad about it, I acquired a good attitude. But even that good attitude really deep down did not understand or believe that there is light at the end. It all looks so different from where I am now, looking back. And I have seen it happen with so many 'old-timers' on this board, whose condition seemed so hopeless for so long. You will be better too!

alan k

ps by 'you' I don't mean pauline, who is of course one of those who are better now.

Re: other cultures, and hidden infection, contagions

nancy s. on 9/16/01 at 00:16 (060526)

fascinating, alan. your anthropological perspective is missed on this board. i still remember fondly your post titled If Only We Had Hooves, way back in early 2000. more than once i've suggested that certain posters/seekers search it out.
nancy

Re: other cultures, and hidden infection, contagions

johnh on 9/16/01 at 10:25 (060569)

allan: i posted last year or longer that having spent two years in Thailand i never heard once of a case of PF. As you know the Thais can squat flat footed and do so for hours on end. It is hard for me to do it for 5 minutes. In the countrysides they go barefooted and you do not see many overweight Thais. By squatting flat footed they are surely stretching the calves and hams and their achilles tendons just have to be loose as a goose. I have always thought our lifestyle and shoe wear were a major reason for an estimated 9 million new cases of PF each year.

Re: other cultures, and hidden infection, contagions

BrianJ on 9/16/01 at 10:29 (060571)

Interesting post, Alan. Have you read some of the old posts from 'Gordon,' and do you believe that digestive issues/yeast overgrowth may be part of the problem?

Re: To Alan

Pauline on 9/16/01 at 16:31 (060602)

Alan,
I truly enjoyed your prospective. We need more of your insight on the board. I hope you will increase your posting when you have the time.

Re: other cultures, and hidden infection, contagions

john h on 9/16/01 at 16:40 (060604)

nancy dear: you can bet there are probably a couple who do have hooves and horns.

Re: other cultures, and hidden infection, contagions

alan k on 9/19/01 at 02:25 (060917)

In fact yes, gordon was a bit before my time but I was very excited at the time about anti-yeast dieting. I even felt a reaction in the first days to the diet (increased symptoms) as was said to be expected according to the theory. I could not maintain the diet perfectly however, though I do believe I did get a reduction in symptoms eventually from it. I would have to look up my old posts to be sure.

It is worth a try for others, if a doctor approves.

Most therapeutic diets require a tremendous amount of research and energy chasing around ingredients. etc.,if they are to be safe in the long run. Short run can usually meet your doctor's approval.

alan k