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My ten year old has been diagnosed with plantar fasc. help

Posted by Mary Jo on 9/26/01 at 13:16 (061633)

My ten year old son has been diagnosed by our family doctor to have plantar fasciitus. I think we caught it early, He had heel pain for a week when I brought him in. Could soccer shoes cause this? Also he has rather flat arches. Does anyone know anything about treating kids? If you have ever tried to keep an extremely active 10 yr old kid off all weight bearing exercise you will know what we are going through.
How long should he stay off it. I'm headed out right now to buy heel inserts should we buy arch supports too? any special websites for kids who have this problem. Thanks

Re: My ten year old has been diagnosed with plantar fasc. help

MJH on 9/26/01 at 15:52 (061643)

Does your ten year old have a 'razor' scooter? My pod mentioned to me on last visit he had been treating a lot of children and youth with pf as a result of scooters. Just wondering? MJH

Re: My ten year old has been diagnosed with plantar fasc. help

Dr. David S. Wander on 9/26/01 at 17:22 (061665)

I've been very active playing soccer and coaching a travel youth soccer team for several years. Although plantar fasciitis can occur in young athletes, heel pain in this age group is usually at the back and lower portion of the heel, and is not usually at the bottom of the heel or along the fascia. This is often referred to as 'Sever's' disease or calcaneal apophysitis. It is an inflammation of the growth plate at the back of the heel, caused by pulling of the Achilles Tendon. The Achilles inserts on the growth plate and traction causes pain. Treatment can be as simple as a heel lift or orthoses, with some rest and ice. Soccer shoes have been imnplicated due to the negative position the heel is in while wearing cleats. Most soccer shoes are very thin and flat, and the heel actually sits lower than the rest of the foot in cleats. I highly recommend a high quality 'turf' shoe. In my opinion, the best soccer turf shoes on the market are made by Adidas or Kelme. Do not purchase a 'cheap' shoe. This sisorder is extremely common in athletes betweeen the ages of 8-12, especially soccer players and basketball players, due to the jumping and ballistic movements.

I haven't examined your son, and his pain may be at the bottom of his heel and may actually be plantar fasciitis. Either way, I would highly recommend a local podiatrist or orthopedist that specializes in sports injuries or specialized in the foot and ankle.

Re: I don't think razor scooter caused it

maryjo on 9/26/01 at 21:45 (061685)

His brother has a razor scooter but my ten year old hasn't been on it for 5 months so I don't think this caused it. He did ride it a lot last spring with no problems.

Re: I thought it might be an achilles problem too but>>>

Mary Jo on 9/26/01 at 22:28 (061693)

I am an exercise physiologist although I have no special knowledge about feet. It is good to see that your thinking followed mine. My first thought was an Achilles- possible growth plate problem too. However his pain is in the bottom of his foot so the plantar fasciitis makes a little more sense even though I expected the achilles problem. the soccer shoes he has are Adidas and it seems the problem started with them. However they are not 'turf' shoes, we will give the turf shoes a try. We bought some inserts for the shoes today at a highly recommended shoe repair shop. Do you practice in Southern California. We are in the san diego area?

Re: I thought it might be an achilles problem too but>>>

Ed Davis, DPM on 9/26/01 at 22:59 (061702)

Mary Jo:

Dr. Donald Green, my former surgery professor, practices in San Diego. I would recommend him highly. I believe Dr. Wander practices in Philly. The growth plate is at the back of the heel bone and pain in the growth plate (calcaneal apophysitis) is very common in the 10 to 13 year old age group. The popularity of soccer has made calcaneal apophsitis more common--soccer shoe design is often the culprit. Pain is usually at the back and bottom of the heel but not into the arch as in plantar fasciitis (it is possible to have both though).
Ed

Re: I thought it might be an achilles problem too but>>>

Dr. David S. Wander on 9/27/01 at 23:27 (061774)

Dr. Davis is correct. I practice in Philadelphia, and I would also highly recommend Dr. Green in California.

Re: My ten year old has been diagnosed with plantar fasc. help

MJH on 9/26/01 at 15:52 (061643)

Does your ten year old have a 'razor' scooter? My pod mentioned to me on last visit he had been treating a lot of children and youth with pf as a result of scooters. Just wondering? MJH

Re: My ten year old has been diagnosed with plantar fasc. help

Dr. David S. Wander on 9/26/01 at 17:22 (061665)

I've been very active playing soccer and coaching a travel youth soccer team for several years. Although plantar fasciitis can occur in young athletes, heel pain in this age group is usually at the back and lower portion of the heel, and is not usually at the bottom of the heel or along the fascia. This is often referred to as 'Sever's' disease or calcaneal apophysitis. It is an inflammation of the growth plate at the back of the heel, caused by pulling of the Achilles Tendon. The Achilles inserts on the growth plate and traction causes pain. Treatment can be as simple as a heel lift or orthoses, with some rest and ice. Soccer shoes have been imnplicated due to the negative position the heel is in while wearing cleats. Most soccer shoes are very thin and flat, and the heel actually sits lower than the rest of the foot in cleats. I highly recommend a high quality 'turf' shoe. In my opinion, the best soccer turf shoes on the market are made by Adidas or Kelme. Do not purchase a 'cheap' shoe. This sisorder is extremely common in athletes betweeen the ages of 8-12, especially soccer players and basketball players, due to the jumping and ballistic movements.

I haven't examined your son, and his pain may be at the bottom of his heel and may actually be plantar fasciitis. Either way, I would highly recommend a local podiatrist or orthopedist that specializes in sports injuries or specialized in the foot and ankle.

Re: I don't think razor scooter caused it

maryjo on 9/26/01 at 21:45 (061685)

His brother has a razor scooter but my ten year old hasn't been on it for 5 months so I don't think this caused it. He did ride it a lot last spring with no problems.

Re: I thought it might be an achilles problem too but>>>

Mary Jo on 9/26/01 at 22:28 (061693)

I am an exercise physiologist although I have no special knowledge about feet. It is good to see that your thinking followed mine. My first thought was an Achilles- possible growth plate problem too. However his pain is in the bottom of his foot so the plantar fasciitis makes a little more sense even though I expected the achilles problem. the soccer shoes he has are Adidas and it seems the problem started with them. However they are not 'turf' shoes, we will give the turf shoes a try. We bought some inserts for the shoes today at a highly recommended shoe repair shop. Do you practice in Southern California. We are in the san diego area?

Re: I thought it might be an achilles problem too but>>>

Ed Davis, DPM on 9/26/01 at 22:59 (061702)

Mary Jo:

Dr. Donald Green, my former surgery professor, practices in San Diego. I would recommend him highly. I believe Dr. Wander practices in Philly. The growth plate is at the back of the heel bone and pain in the growth plate (calcaneal apophysitis) is very common in the 10 to 13 year old age group. The popularity of soccer has made calcaneal apophsitis more common--soccer shoe design is often the culprit. Pain is usually at the back and bottom of the heel but not into the arch as in plantar fasciitis (it is possible to have both though).
Ed

Re: I thought it might be an achilles problem too but>>>

Dr. David S. Wander on 9/27/01 at 23:27 (061774)

Dr. Davis is correct. I practice in Philadelphia, and I would also highly recommend Dr. Green in California.