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Question about ultrasound

Posted by Suzanne D on 10/18/01 at 15:06 (063239)

A friend in another state told me that she had PF for several years and that her chiropractor did some 'ultrasound' treatments on her feet and that she is 'all better' now. Is this something like ESWT? I am confused about this and thought I would ask the experts! Thank you for any information you can give me.

Re: Question about ultrasound

Irmgard J. on 10/19/01 at 19:40 (063311)

Suzanne,
Some ESWT equipments have a built-in (in-line) ultrasound. The purpose of using the ultrasound is to localize the pain area. The ESWT (sound wave) applications can then be pinpointed directly to the affected area, which increases the effectiveness of the treatment. In addition, the shock rate can be lower which makes the treatment more pleasant for the patient. Bayshore (Canada) provides ESWT treatment locating the pain point with the help of ultrasound imaging.

Re: Question about ultrasound

Ed Davis, DPM on 10/19/01 at 21:11 (063320)

Irmgard:

The ultrasound you are referring to is diagnostic ultrasound. It is akin to sonar and is a form of imaging. Suzanne is referring to therapeutic ultrasound which is a high frequency sound wave which can break up scar tissue and inflammation.
Ed

Re: Question about ultrasound

Ed Davis, DPM on 10/19/01 at 21:14 (063321)

Suzanne:

Therapeutic ultrasound has been around for a long time. It involves the application of high frequency sound waves and is a form of physical therapy, often effective for plantar fasciitis. ESWT is a 'cousin' of this in that it is a audible low frequency shock wave--greater intensity than the waves used in ultrasound and with what appears to be a more significant therapeutic effect.
Ed

Re: Question about ultrasound

Suzanne D on 10/21/01 at 07:18 (063375)

Thank you for this information!

Re: Question about ultrasound

J. P. Jacob on 10/25/01 at 08:18 (063590)

Among many there seems to be a confusion (well justified) between ultrasound treatment, ESWT (Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy) treatment and ultrasound imaging, a component used with ESWT treatment.
For those who visit the ESWT page, there may be additional uncertainty due to the various names that are being used synonymous to ESWT, such as Ossatron treatment, Sonorex treatment, etc. All the above are only brand names of equipments or a company who performs ESWT treatment.
Ed Davis, also well intended, is quoting ESWT as a 'cousin' of high power frequency sound wave, i.e. an audible low frequency high intensity, 20,000 Khz, ie. beyond the normal hearing range of humans. However, something that is audible is not an ultrasound. It is a sound wave. ESWT frequency is around 4 Hz.
ESWT has not been around for a long time. From clinical studies, routine treatment to the public was started in Europe during the first half of the 90s. Contrary to the statement 'application of high frequency sound waves as a form of physical therapy', ESWT equipment is a development that follows the principles of lithotripsy (breaking of kidney stone).
ESWT with specific protocols is used for the elimination of heel spur, calcifying tendinitis of the joints and non-union fractures, etc. As stated, treatment of plantar fasciitis is one of the several applications one can use ESWT for.
Depending on the application, of course selection of the equipment and a well established treatment protocol play a major factor.
In Europe where ESWT was developed, it is absolutely necessary to use the imaging ultra sound as part of the ESW equipment. One or more pain points the patient may have along the ligaments are detected (with the help of the patient) and the treatment head is locked with the help of ultrasound imaging. During the treatment, the ultrasound imaging is on. If there is any slight movement of the patient during the treatment, the treatment head location can be readjusted. The same applies to treatment of calcification or non-union fractures.
In order to reduce the huge capital cost, many manufacturers and clinics decide not to have ultra sound imaging in North America. This is unheard of in Europe. Practitioners there feel that it would be like searching a needle in a haystack. I believe that the use of imaging ultrasound is one of the reasons for our high success rate in Bayshore's ESWT clinic in Canada.
To the best of our knowledge we are the only, or perhaps one out of a minority of treatment centres in North America, using ultrasound imaging with ESWT. We also have a unique and highly developed treatment protocol (proprietary to Bayshore).

Re: Question about ultrasound

Irmgard J. on 10/19/01 at 19:40 (063311)

Suzanne,
Some ESWT equipments have a built-in (in-line) ultrasound. The purpose of using the ultrasound is to localize the pain area. The ESWT (sound wave) applications can then be pinpointed directly to the affected area, which increases the effectiveness of the treatment. In addition, the shock rate can be lower which makes the treatment more pleasant for the patient. Bayshore (Canada) provides ESWT treatment locating the pain point with the help of ultrasound imaging.

Re: Question about ultrasound

Ed Davis, DPM on 10/19/01 at 21:11 (063320)

Irmgard:

The ultrasound you are referring to is diagnostic ultrasound. It is akin to sonar and is a form of imaging. Suzanne is referring to therapeutic ultrasound which is a high frequency sound wave which can break up scar tissue and inflammation.
Ed

Re: Question about ultrasound

Ed Davis, DPM on 10/19/01 at 21:14 (063321)

Suzanne:

Therapeutic ultrasound has been around for a long time. It involves the application of high frequency sound waves and is a form of physical therapy, often effective for plantar fasciitis. ESWT is a 'cousin' of this in that it is a audible low frequency shock wave--greater intensity than the waves used in ultrasound and with what appears to be a more significant therapeutic effect.
Ed

Re: Question about ultrasound

Suzanne D on 10/21/01 at 07:18 (063375)

Thank you for this information!

Re: Question about ultrasound

J. P. Jacob on 10/25/01 at 08:18 (063590)

Among many there seems to be a confusion (well justified) between ultrasound treatment, ESWT (Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy) treatment and ultrasound imaging, a component used with ESWT treatment.
For those who visit the ESWT page, there may be additional uncertainty due to the various names that are being used synonymous to ESWT, such as Ossatron treatment, Sonorex treatment, etc. All the above are only brand names of equipments or a company who performs ESWT treatment.
Ed Davis, also well intended, is quoting ESWT as a 'cousin' of high power frequency sound wave, i.e. an audible low frequency high intensity, 20,000 Khz, ie. beyond the normal hearing range of humans. However, something that is audible is not an ultrasound. It is a sound wave. ESWT frequency is around 4 Hz.
ESWT has not been around for a long time. From clinical studies, routine treatment to the public was started in Europe during the first half of the 90s. Contrary to the statement 'application of high frequency sound waves as a form of physical therapy', ESWT equipment is a development that follows the principles of lithotripsy (breaking of kidney stone).
ESWT with specific protocols is used for the elimination of heel spur, calcifying tendinitis of the joints and non-union fractures, etc. As stated, treatment of plantar fasciitis is one of the several applications one can use ESWT for.
Depending on the application, of course selection of the equipment and a well established treatment protocol play a major factor.
In Europe where ESWT was developed, it is absolutely necessary to use the imaging ultra sound as part of the ESW equipment. One or more pain points the patient may have along the ligaments are detected (with the help of the patient) and the treatment head is locked with the help of ultrasound imaging. During the treatment, the ultrasound imaging is on. If there is any slight movement of the patient during the treatment, the treatment head location can be readjusted. The same applies to treatment of calcification or non-union fractures.
In order to reduce the huge capital cost, many manufacturers and clinics decide not to have ultra sound imaging in North America. This is unheard of in Europe. Practitioners there feel that it would be like searching a needle in a haystack. I believe that the use of imaging ultrasound is one of the reasons for our high success rate in Bayshore's ESWT clinic in Canada.
To the best of our knowledge we are the only, or perhaps one out of a minority of treatment centres in North America, using ultrasound imaging with ESWT. We also have a unique and highly developed treatment protocol (proprietary to Bayshore).