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PF completely gone, feet feel great.

Posted by Joe L on 10/23/01 at 12:58 (063458)

I have suffered with Plantar Fashion It Us for over a year and a half. Morning pain, soreness all day, painful burning of the arch and just worn out feeling feet. It started in the left foot and after self treatment with no success, saw a doc who gave me anti-inflamatories and shoe inserts with a large arch support. They hurt big time but he assured me that was normal and it would probably get better. After several weeks it started in the right foot and it was then I quit wearing the inserts and just wore running shoes with a somewhat high arch and this full wrap around foot support shaped like the bottom of a foot, typical of the new style of shoes. Months later while still suffering with PF in both feet, I was on a flight with nothing to do and though about the way a foot is designed. The heel is hard, the pad behind the toes a hard pad too. The arch is a soft and shaped like an arch so would not normally bear any weight walking on a hard flat surface. So why in the world would you wear a shoe that put pressure on the soft tissue in the arch? I felt stupid for not thinking of this until now. The next day I went barefoot as much a possible, cut a little heel in some old running shoes, took out the insert and cut and sanded it so it was much like walking with no shoes at all. The results were impressive. I also started again with Ibuprofen, which did very little in the past. In about 3 to 5 weeks the soreness was almost gone but the occasional burning in the left foot persisted for several months. (This very painful burning had been present for almost a year and only a stretch would relieve it.) The burning has gone away and my feet feel great. I currently wear running shoes with sole and insert modifications to keep the pressure off of the arch as much as possible. Also some Tandy moccasins are good for just running around the house. I also wear Sperry Topsiders but these still need some more modification as they are still a bit 'shaped' in the arch and put a bit too much pressure in the wrong spot. I am now wondering if all this PF is caused from these new style of shoes with these fancy molded rubber and foam inserts made to conform to the bottom of an average foot. Remember Keds? The sole and insert was cut from sheet foam and rubber. No arch support, it was just like walking on flat ground. I was younger then but I never remember my feet hurting. Looking back, I think Birkenstock caused my PF to start. I'll never wear another arch support shoe. Give me flat ground any day. It does take a while to build back you heel toughness but that is the way a foot is designed to work. My feet don't feel 'worn out' any more. I can go all day walking and standing now, something I couldn't do before. NO morning pain at all! I encourage all who suffer with PF to try this and get your feet back into proper shape. I certainly was easy and cheap, once I understood the problem. Give it a try! Also, e-mail me if this works for you.

Re: PF completely gone, feet feel great.

BrianG on 10/23/01 at 17:15 (063481)

Wow Joe, thats great that you were able to cure your Plantar Fashion It Us. Are you selling a book, or a product? Man, I'd buy just about anything to cure my PF. Oh ya, you forgot your e-mail address. How can we contact you?

BCG

Re: Plantar Fashion It Us completely gone, feet feel great.

Joe L on 10/23/01 at 18:07 (063485)

If my feet still hurt maybe I'd write a book but now I'm on them all day and don't have time. Just try going with flat shoes and see what happens. My reasoning was that it can't get any worse, and if flat shoes didn't hurt, then it could not be too bad for my feet. Try some very flat shoes or barefoot first without Ibuprofen, then if things are going well, go on about 1200 mg a day for a month or more. I took this dosage with inserts in my shoes with no effect so it was not the Ibuprofen, it was the flat shoes for sure. I now take nothing and feet feel fine with flat shoes. Just recently I talked to a custom shoe maker about PF and he said an old treatment, (100 years old), for PF was to put the patient in cowboy boots. Could this have worked because of the flat nature of the old boots? Don't know. Also just recently a doctor friend of mine said he had PF in the past and he switched from Bikrs to Topsiders. He said he found that the flat shoes worked well. Get started today and take those inserts out, go flat, and start living. If you have had it bad, expect 4 to 6 months to fully recover. It took me that long once I went flat but my feet were in bad shape. I had the soreness and the burning. The important thing is that they continually get better although slowly. Don't expect to have zero pain in the first weeks of going flat. jlacour4@bellsouth.net

Re: Plantar Fashion It Us completely gone, feet feel great.

Sandy H on 10/23/01 at 22:40 (063513)

I think the point the lesson I take from your experience is to experiment with what feels best for your feet and don't always listen to the 'experts' because ultimately pain is the best guide as to whether you are doing damage in my experience. I also stopped wearing orthotics but I have to say wearing flat-soled hiking boots with no cushioning appeared to make my PF worse and I'm now in running shoes with motion control. What exactly do you do around the house? I'm wearing Birkenstock and I don't find them as evil as orthotics in terms of aggravating my sensitive arch. I also think for my feet at least no interference with my arch and letting it collapse a bit to take the shock is better for them. Fingers crossed the PF will go away eventually as it seems to be less painful but more ever present without orthotics. How long did you take anti-inflams? Weren't you worried about longterm risks?

Re: Plantar Fashion It Us completely gone, feet feel great.

Joe L on 10/24/01 at 06:58 (063521)

I wear some self modified running shoes 50%, Topsiders, 30%, and 20% barefoot. We have carpet and tile and I also walk on cement during the day. I took anti-Inflams for 6 weeks with no problems. You have to take these without stopping for them to work. About 1200 mg of ibuprofen is what I took per day. Also when my knee acts up, I take the same thing for a few weeks and then stop. I also know people that take them continuously. Taking them for a few days and them stopping is wasting time. Doc friend said that this was no problem as long as it didn't upset the stomach. Slowly try to put more and more weight on your heel and less on your arch. If it doesn't hurt, it probably is OK but be careful. Back when I was suffering with PF, I once went on a business trip and wore some dress shoes with a wedge sole and big arch support. After a few days I could hardly walk from the pain and it took a while to back track. I keep thinking about when I was in my teens walking barefoot all day on cement. Let me know how this works.

Re: Anyone new reading this thread......a word of caution

Carmen H on 10/24/01 at 08:51 (063527)

I think it's great that Joe has cured himself of PF but I want to say a word of caution to those who aren't regulars on this board and sometimes take the things they read to heart. We are not doctors (unless it says so by someone's name)....myself included and the advice we give or the things we say are only from our own experience with our own feet. So even though the things Joe says sound good for a quick fix I would be VERY careful and not throw out those inserts and start going with no support. As you may have read in hundreds of posts in this site this is not typical therapy for people suffering with PF. Most of us need support.
Joe I remember going barefoot on concrete and runing and jumping...playing for hour with no shoes when I was little too. BUT, we are older, weigh more and have more years on our feet, backs, legs and knees. That has to be taken into account. Children seem to heal faster than adults when it comes to these types of problems anyway. Just another reason children, teens and young adults are the best athletes most of the time.....they haven't had a chance to break down yet.....So please don't take offense to what I have said but words are strong to people who are suffering and I am afraid someone will take this one post as the norm. and it's just not...that could do more harm than good. You may want to add to your posts....'This is what worked for ME' after your statements of 'Get started today and take those inserts out, go flat, and start living. If you have had it bad, expect 4 to 6 months to fully recover.' Please let people know you aren't a doctor.
Just looking out for the newbies and the people who may take every word they read to heart and act on it.

Re: Carmen, I agree

Steve P on 10/24/01 at 09:20 (063528)

Well said, Carmen. I am happy for Joe but his post is not the norm. Newcomers should read the PF Book on this website for the best overall information.

A mild case of PF can be easily aggravated. A conservative appraoch is best.

Re: Anyone new reading this thread......a word of caution

Joe L on 10/24/01 at 09:34 (063531)

No I'm not a doctor, but apparently a bit wiser and I did stay at a Holiday Inn a few times. Hey, this is what worked for me after 1000.00 of shoes, 20 pounds of inserts, and many doctors visits. It took guts to go flat. I was a bit scared at first after knowing all of the usual recommendations for PF and seeing all of the inserts stacked in my closet. Like I said, I tried this out of desperation and it worked 100% so I thought others should know. I wish someone told me this several years ago. My doctor friend did it too and wears his Topsiders all the time with no socks. I've just heard so many stories of people with extreme problems and collapsed lives that I thought others should know what I did. If someone tries this and things are worse, stop. Although the same should holds true for inserts. If they hurt, stop. But on the other hand, if one person tries this and it works, it was worth the time to send these messages.

Re: Anyone new reading this thread......a word of caution

Carmen H on 10/24/01 at 11:49 (063537)

'If someone tries this and things are worse, stop'
That's all I was saying. That this needed to be in the first post.....Most of us regulars and long term sufferers of PF understand that what we do is at our own risk. But some people just don't get it. That what they read is NOT necessarily going to help THEM just b/c it helped someone else and they could end up WAY worse than they were. As long as people know treatments are on an INDIVIDUAL basis we're fine.

That's all I am trying to get across. I can appreciate the time you put into this and thefact that you want to help others (believe me we all want everyone to be relieved of this hindrance).

Re: Steve P

Carmen H on 10/24/01 at 11:50 (063538)

Amen Steve......it's too bad we even have to be on this board for such a terrible problem....but good thing we have it tht's for sure!

Re: Anyone new reading this thread......a word of caution

BrianJ on 10/24/01 at 11:58 (063539)

Hi Joe --

Just wanted to thank you for taking the time to explain your 'going flat' experience. We on this board value different points of view, and I am certainly glad that your feet got better. As long as we are intelligent and cautious, we can sometimes benefit from trying different things.

Can you explain your previous pain a little more? For example, was it in both feet? Did it hurt worse if you were standing in one place or walking? Did your ankles and lower legs burn? Finally, do you have high, low or average arches?

Thanks for your input.

Re: Anyone new reading this thread......a word of caution

Joe L on 10/24/01 at 13:20 (063544)

My PF started out in my left foot. 1st Doc diagnosed it as PF. Lots of first step pain in the morning and soreness during the day. The center of the pain was just in front of the heel just in from the centerline. That is when I got my first inserts that he told me to wear in both shoes. I should have been more intelligent and cautious and not have worn something that hurt so much. It was probably hurting worse but the drugs he gave me might have masked it. After a few weeks of the hurting inserts it started in the right foot. This was my first clue. Back into soft soled running shoes with a arch support and it hurt less than the inserts but still had all of the previous pain. Then the burning started in the left foot. From the main PF sore spot forward along the arch. It would start burning and the only thing that would relieve was to stretch it out. This would happen maybe 10 times a day and last for 5 minitues. It would come on sometimes just standing but most of the time walking. Ankles didn't seem to hurt much. After I went flat, it took about 4 weeks for the soreness to go away 80%, the burning diminished slowly but steadily for 6 months before it was completely gone. This must have been some serious damage and it has been 2 months since I have had it at all. I waited until now to make sure nothing came back before I started telling others. According to the Doc, my arches are average. This is more than an opinion. Having a scientific background I have tried to think this problem out and proceed with a careful scientific approach. As a result, my feet feel better than ever. Actually, I don't even feel them at all. I walk 2 to 3 miles in our subdivision 4 times a week on paved streets with my modified flat running shoes. Something I could not even think about doing a year ago. Soon I will start running again. Seriously, if arch support is so good, why is everyone still having problems?

Re: Anyone new reading this thread......a word of caution

nancy s. on 10/24/01 at 15:55 (063555)

maybe because we *didn't* have arch support and it *resulted* in pf, and for a minority of cases the problem takes longer to resolve and requires more than one method of treatment. in most cases -- perhaps not all, but i sure have to wonder -- one crucial method of treatment is ensuring proper support for a pf sufferer's feet.
i would eat dirt rather than go without arch support again. my work had me on my feet most of the day almost every day for five years, and i wore rotten, flat shoes and boots with absolutely no support. it was only when i finally got a pair of Birkenstock , eight months later, with their moderate but perfect-for-me arch support, that i saw the beginning of my pf improvement.
just another regular's experience here.

Re: Anyone new reading this thread......a word of caution

paula on 10/24/01 at 22:11 (063578)

i'm a at the point of doing whatever sounds just rediculous. i am ready to wear my underwear on my head every tuesday to see if it helps. i think you were brave to try that. my bare feet havn't touched ground in a year and a half. i have very flat pronated feet and i think that each of us has to grope for our own way. i don't think going flat will work for me.but thanks for the idea and the details. am interested if other flatfoots have or will try this. i used to be a barefoot hippy and would love to walk like that again upon the earth some day.

Re: Anyone new reading this thread......a word of caution

Sandy H on 10/24/01 at 22:42 (063582)

I know that many people wear arch supports and orthotics and they work fine for their feet (probably flat footed or whatever type) but medical people keep prescribing it for everyone and for some people I'm convinced it makes the problem worse. Knowing that is useful for treatment I think and the only time I found that out was on the Internet. No doctor every told me.

Re: Anyone new reading this thread......a word of caution

nancy s. on 10/25/01 at 05:58 (063586)

paula, i used to be a hippie too (although the always-going-to-school-or-work variety, so i guess i was pseudo) -- i wasn't a barefoot one, though. just always wore bad shoes or boots! for what it's worth, my feet are like yours: flat and pronated. let me know if the underwear on your head every tuesday works, ok? i'd still like to get rid of the last 10% of discomfort!
as sandy points out below, some people do have a lot of trouble with the arches in some orthotics or shoes. my first pair of orthotics was wretched wretched wretched -- hard plastic 3/4 things with a big fall-off at the arch. made things worse. much later, and quite a long time after finding Birkenstock , i tried another pair of orthotics at the insistence of my doc, my pt, and just about everyone involved in my foot problems. these were made by an excellent orthotist, he fitted me correctly, and they're a work of art, and all logic told me that they should work. and they might have worked -- if they felt good. but i never got used to the high arch, and we reached a point where he didn't want to adjust any further because that would destroy the anti-pronation properties of the orthotics.
so i returned to Birkenstock , and wear them all the time except for specific times when i need my new balance 608s.
even though science said that i need the high arch in the orthotics, my flat pronated feet love the lower arch of Birkenstock .
i still believe some kind of support is crucial for most people, but the exact kind or amount that science dictates doesn't always work in reality. as usual, every individual is different, and i went with what felt best and am 90% improved.
nancy

Re: Going Flat

Joe L on 10/25/01 at 08:47 (063591)

Have any studies been done of ancient civilizations and their foot wear and foot problems? I have a hard time believing that the Egyptians had shoes with arch support and the Pyramids could not have been built with sore feet. What about the American Indians footwear? OK, they didn't have concrete but in some locations they walked on rock and hard packed trails. Could it be that modern technology has enabled us to construct form fitted shoes and become addicted to them? I don't know and don't claim that this is the problem but it does make me wonder. While not a foot doctor, I am an engineer and when I look at a foot as a structure, it is obvious that the primary load was made to be placed on the heel and not in the soft tissue in the middle. It hurts just thinking about it. Again, going flat worked for me and my feet were in a real bad way. I encourage others with PF to try going flat only cautiously. It's probably much less risky than surgery.

Re: Going Flat

Roberta on 10/25/01 at 14:13 (063597)

Hi all: Am following this thread with a great deal of interest. When I first started to get 'foot problems' I went out and bought an expensive pair of running shoes that had lots of padding and a big molded arch. Big mistake, although I didn't realize it at the time, because now not only did my heel hurt, but my arch hurt too. My chiropractor suggested orthotics, which I ordered through him -- hard corky things with a big molded arch. They made things worse in 2 ways -- too hard for my heel and my arch hurt like hell. Podiatrist, who diagnosed my PF, recommended Spenco insoles, which were certainly softer, but (you guessed it)have a big molded arch. Finally figured out my poor feet can't deal with that, and now am using less expensive running shoes with a flatter 'last', added a Dr. Scholls pillow insole and a heel pad for cushioning. Maybe a pair of really expensive, correctly made insoles would work, but those of us with sensitive arches (by the way, my feet are not flat)should stay away from the off the shelf stuff.

Re: PF completely gone, feet feel great.

BrianG on 10/23/01 at 17:15 (063481)

Wow Joe, thats great that you were able to cure your Plantar Fashion It Us. Are you selling a book, or a product? Man, I'd buy just about anything to cure my PF. Oh ya, you forgot your e-mail address. How can we contact you?

BCG

Re: Plantar Fashion It Us completely gone, feet feel great.

Joe L on 10/23/01 at 18:07 (063485)

If my feet still hurt maybe I'd write a book but now I'm on them all day and don't have time. Just try going with flat shoes and see what happens. My reasoning was that it can't get any worse, and if flat shoes didn't hurt, then it could not be too bad for my feet. Try some very flat shoes or barefoot first without Ibuprofen, then if things are going well, go on about 1200 mg a day for a month or more. I took this dosage with inserts in my shoes with no effect so it was not the Ibuprofen, it was the flat shoes for sure. I now take nothing and feet feel fine with flat shoes. Just recently I talked to a custom shoe maker about PF and he said an old treatment, (100 years old), for PF was to put the patient in cowboy boots. Could this have worked because of the flat nature of the old boots? Don't know. Also just recently a doctor friend of mine said he had PF in the past and he switched from Bikrs to Topsiders. He said he found that the flat shoes worked well. Get started today and take those inserts out, go flat, and start living. If you have had it bad, expect 4 to 6 months to fully recover. It took me that long once I went flat but my feet were in bad shape. I had the soreness and the burning. The important thing is that they continually get better although slowly. Don't expect to have zero pain in the first weeks of going flat. jlacour4@bellsouth.net

Re: Plantar Fashion It Us completely gone, feet feel great.

Sandy H on 10/23/01 at 22:40 (063513)

I think the point the lesson I take from your experience is to experiment with what feels best for your feet and don't always listen to the 'experts' because ultimately pain is the best guide as to whether you are doing damage in my experience. I also stopped wearing orthotics but I have to say wearing flat-soled hiking boots with no cushioning appeared to make my PF worse and I'm now in running shoes with motion control. What exactly do you do around the house? I'm wearing Birkenstock and I don't find them as evil as orthotics in terms of aggravating my sensitive arch. I also think for my feet at least no interference with my arch and letting it collapse a bit to take the shock is better for them. Fingers crossed the PF will go away eventually as it seems to be less painful but more ever present without orthotics. How long did you take anti-inflams? Weren't you worried about longterm risks?

Re: Plantar Fashion It Us completely gone, feet feel great.

Joe L on 10/24/01 at 06:58 (063521)

I wear some self modified running shoes 50%, Topsiders, 30%, and 20% barefoot. We have carpet and tile and I also walk on cement during the day. I took anti-Inflams for 6 weeks with no problems. You have to take these without stopping for them to work. About 1200 mg of ibuprofen is what I took per day. Also when my knee acts up, I take the same thing for a few weeks and then stop. I also know people that take them continuously. Taking them for a few days and them stopping is wasting time. Doc friend said that this was no problem as long as it didn't upset the stomach. Slowly try to put more and more weight on your heel and less on your arch. If it doesn't hurt, it probably is OK but be careful. Back when I was suffering with PF, I once went on a business trip and wore some dress shoes with a wedge sole and big arch support. After a few days I could hardly walk from the pain and it took a while to back track. I keep thinking about when I was in my teens walking barefoot all day on cement. Let me know how this works.

Re: Anyone new reading this thread......a word of caution

Carmen H on 10/24/01 at 08:51 (063527)

I think it's great that Joe has cured himself of PF but I want to say a word of caution to those who aren't regulars on this board and sometimes take the things they read to heart. We are not doctors (unless it says so by someone's name)....myself included and the advice we give or the things we say are only from our own experience with our own feet. So even though the things Joe says sound good for a quick fix I would be VERY careful and not throw out those inserts and start going with no support. As you may have read in hundreds of posts in this site this is not typical therapy for people suffering with PF. Most of us need support.
Joe I remember going barefoot on concrete and runing and jumping...playing for hour with no shoes when I was little too. BUT, we are older, weigh more and have more years on our feet, backs, legs and knees. That has to be taken into account. Children seem to heal faster than adults when it comes to these types of problems anyway. Just another reason children, teens and young adults are the best athletes most of the time.....they haven't had a chance to break down yet.....So please don't take offense to what I have said but words are strong to people who are suffering and I am afraid someone will take this one post as the norm. and it's just not...that could do more harm than good. You may want to add to your posts....'This is what worked for ME' after your statements of 'Get started today and take those inserts out, go flat, and start living. If you have had it bad, expect 4 to 6 months to fully recover.' Please let people know you aren't a doctor.
Just looking out for the newbies and the people who may take every word they read to heart and act on it.

Re: Carmen, I agree

Steve P on 10/24/01 at 09:20 (063528)

Well said, Carmen. I am happy for Joe but his post is not the norm. Newcomers should read the PF Book on this website for the best overall information.

A mild case of PF can be easily aggravated. A conservative appraoch is best.

Re: Anyone new reading this thread......a word of caution

Joe L on 10/24/01 at 09:34 (063531)

No I'm not a doctor, but apparently a bit wiser and I did stay at a Holiday Inn a few times. Hey, this is what worked for me after 1000.00 of shoes, 20 pounds of inserts, and many doctors visits. It took guts to go flat. I was a bit scared at first after knowing all of the usual recommendations for PF and seeing all of the inserts stacked in my closet. Like I said, I tried this out of desperation and it worked 100% so I thought others should know. I wish someone told me this several years ago. My doctor friend did it too and wears his Topsiders all the time with no socks. I've just heard so many stories of people with extreme problems and collapsed lives that I thought others should know what I did. If someone tries this and things are worse, stop. Although the same should holds true for inserts. If they hurt, stop. But on the other hand, if one person tries this and it works, it was worth the time to send these messages.

Re: Anyone new reading this thread......a word of caution

Carmen H on 10/24/01 at 11:49 (063537)

'If someone tries this and things are worse, stop'
That's all I was saying. That this needed to be in the first post.....Most of us regulars and long term sufferers of PF understand that what we do is at our own risk. But some people just don't get it. That what they read is NOT necessarily going to help THEM just b/c it helped someone else and they could end up WAY worse than they were. As long as people know treatments are on an INDIVIDUAL basis we're fine.

That's all I am trying to get across. I can appreciate the time you put into this and thefact that you want to help others (believe me we all want everyone to be relieved of this hindrance).

Re: Steve P

Carmen H on 10/24/01 at 11:50 (063538)

Amen Steve......it's too bad we even have to be on this board for such a terrible problem....but good thing we have it tht's for sure!

Re: Anyone new reading this thread......a word of caution

BrianJ on 10/24/01 at 11:58 (063539)

Hi Joe --

Just wanted to thank you for taking the time to explain your 'going flat' experience. We on this board value different points of view, and I am certainly glad that your feet got better. As long as we are intelligent and cautious, we can sometimes benefit from trying different things.

Can you explain your previous pain a little more? For example, was it in both feet? Did it hurt worse if you were standing in one place or walking? Did your ankles and lower legs burn? Finally, do you have high, low or average arches?

Thanks for your input.

Re: Anyone new reading this thread......a word of caution

Joe L on 10/24/01 at 13:20 (063544)

My PF started out in my left foot. 1st Doc diagnosed it as PF. Lots of first step pain in the morning and soreness during the day. The center of the pain was just in front of the heel just in from the centerline. That is when I got my first inserts that he told me to wear in both shoes. I should have been more intelligent and cautious and not have worn something that hurt so much. It was probably hurting worse but the drugs he gave me might have masked it. After a few weeks of the hurting inserts it started in the right foot. This was my first clue. Back into soft soled running shoes with a arch support and it hurt less than the inserts but still had all of the previous pain. Then the burning started in the left foot. From the main PF sore spot forward along the arch. It would start burning and the only thing that would relieve was to stretch it out. This would happen maybe 10 times a day and last for 5 minitues. It would come on sometimes just standing but most of the time walking. Ankles didn't seem to hurt much. After I went flat, it took about 4 weeks for the soreness to go away 80%, the burning diminished slowly but steadily for 6 months before it was completely gone. This must have been some serious damage and it has been 2 months since I have had it at all. I waited until now to make sure nothing came back before I started telling others. According to the Doc, my arches are average. This is more than an opinion. Having a scientific background I have tried to think this problem out and proceed with a careful scientific approach. As a result, my feet feel better than ever. Actually, I don't even feel them at all. I walk 2 to 3 miles in our subdivision 4 times a week on paved streets with my modified flat running shoes. Something I could not even think about doing a year ago. Soon I will start running again. Seriously, if arch support is so good, why is everyone still having problems?

Re: Anyone new reading this thread......a word of caution

nancy s. on 10/24/01 at 15:55 (063555)

maybe because we *didn't* have arch support and it *resulted* in pf, and for a minority of cases the problem takes longer to resolve and requires more than one method of treatment. in most cases -- perhaps not all, but i sure have to wonder -- one crucial method of treatment is ensuring proper support for a pf sufferer's feet.
i would eat dirt rather than go without arch support again. my work had me on my feet most of the day almost every day for five years, and i wore rotten, flat shoes and boots with absolutely no support. it was only when i finally got a pair of Birkenstock , eight months later, with their moderate but perfect-for-me arch support, that i saw the beginning of my pf improvement.
just another regular's experience here.

Re: Anyone new reading this thread......a word of caution

paula on 10/24/01 at 22:11 (063578)

i'm a at the point of doing whatever sounds just rediculous. i am ready to wear my underwear on my head every tuesday to see if it helps. i think you were brave to try that. my bare feet havn't touched ground in a year and a half. i have very flat pronated feet and i think that each of us has to grope for our own way. i don't think going flat will work for me.but thanks for the idea and the details. am interested if other flatfoots have or will try this. i used to be a barefoot hippy and would love to walk like that again upon the earth some day.

Re: Anyone new reading this thread......a word of caution

Sandy H on 10/24/01 at 22:42 (063582)

I know that many people wear arch supports and orthotics and they work fine for their feet (probably flat footed or whatever type) but medical people keep prescribing it for everyone and for some people I'm convinced it makes the problem worse. Knowing that is useful for treatment I think and the only time I found that out was on the Internet. No doctor every told me.

Re: Anyone new reading this thread......a word of caution

nancy s. on 10/25/01 at 05:58 (063586)

paula, i used to be a hippie too (although the always-going-to-school-or-work variety, so i guess i was pseudo) -- i wasn't a barefoot one, though. just always wore bad shoes or boots! for what it's worth, my feet are like yours: flat and pronated. let me know if the underwear on your head every tuesday works, ok? i'd still like to get rid of the last 10% of discomfort!
as sandy points out below, some people do have a lot of trouble with the arches in some orthotics or shoes. my first pair of orthotics was wretched wretched wretched -- hard plastic 3/4 things with a big fall-off at the arch. made things worse. much later, and quite a long time after finding Birkenstock , i tried another pair of orthotics at the insistence of my doc, my pt, and just about everyone involved in my foot problems. these were made by an excellent orthotist, he fitted me correctly, and they're a work of art, and all logic told me that they should work. and they might have worked -- if they felt good. but i never got used to the high arch, and we reached a point where he didn't want to adjust any further because that would destroy the anti-pronation properties of the orthotics.
so i returned to Birkenstock , and wear them all the time except for specific times when i need my new balance 608s.
even though science said that i need the high arch in the orthotics, my flat pronated feet love the lower arch of Birkenstock .
i still believe some kind of support is crucial for most people, but the exact kind or amount that science dictates doesn't always work in reality. as usual, every individual is different, and i went with what felt best and am 90% improved.
nancy

Re: Going Flat

Joe L on 10/25/01 at 08:47 (063591)

Have any studies been done of ancient civilizations and their foot wear and foot problems? I have a hard time believing that the Egyptians had shoes with arch support and the Pyramids could not have been built with sore feet. What about the American Indians footwear? OK, they didn't have concrete but in some locations they walked on rock and hard packed trails. Could it be that modern technology has enabled us to construct form fitted shoes and become addicted to them? I don't know and don't claim that this is the problem but it does make me wonder. While not a foot doctor, I am an engineer and when I look at a foot as a structure, it is obvious that the primary load was made to be placed on the heel and not in the soft tissue in the middle. It hurts just thinking about it. Again, going flat worked for me and my feet were in a real bad way. I encourage others with PF to try going flat only cautiously. It's probably much less risky than surgery.

Re: Going Flat

Roberta on 10/25/01 at 14:13 (063597)

Hi all: Am following this thread with a great deal of interest. When I first started to get 'foot problems' I went out and bought an expensive pair of running shoes that had lots of padding and a big molded arch. Big mistake, although I didn't realize it at the time, because now not only did my heel hurt, but my arch hurt too. My chiropractor suggested orthotics, which I ordered through him -- hard corky things with a big molded arch. They made things worse in 2 ways -- too hard for my heel and my arch hurt like hell. Podiatrist, who diagnosed my PF, recommended Spenco insoles, which were certainly softer, but (you guessed it)have a big molded arch. Finally figured out my poor feet can't deal with that, and now am using less expensive running shoes with a flatter 'last', added a Dr. Scholls pillow insole and a heel pad for cushioning. Maybe a pair of really expensive, correctly made insoles would work, but those of us with sensitive arches (by the way, my feet are not flat)should stay away from the off the shelf stuff.