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barefoot

Posted by Nola M. on 10/26/01 at 17:35 (063652)

Hi, I live in Hawaii where we go barefoot in the house. I have vinyl surfacing on concrete. Outdoors I usually wear thongs with some rubber cushioning. About a year ago I began wearing real shoes (walking shoes with arch support) at a botanical garden where I volunteer. Since I've begun wearing shoes, I have developed plantar fasciitis. The podiatrist said it is because I have Morton's foot which gives me a poor gait and I should wear orthotics both indoors and outdoors at all times. The orthotics make my feet ache worse. My osteopath said to exercise the bottom of my foot on a golf ball. The golf ball exercise resulted in my being unable to walk at all for two days. A sports injury doctor said to take Aleve. The only thing that helps is aspirin every 4 hours night and day. (Aleve doesn't do the trick.) Any suggestions would be much appreciated. I'm desperate and have gone back to being barefoot while in the house and wearing thongs outside. I should add that I wear wide width shoes and have a difficult time finding any wide enough for me. I'm 68 years old and the osteopath seemed to think my problem was related to age and lack of cushioning. Help anyone?

Re: barefoot

Dr. Zuckerman on 10/27/01 at 23:54 (063702)

Hi

The use of the golf ball will only make the plantar fascia and surrounding tendons more inflamed. So stop that one. It is possible that your shoe
have placed pressure on the nerve in the front of the foot between the toes. This is called morton neuroma. So have that checked out.
The fact that you want to get your shoe off is one sign of this condiion

I would need to know more about your pain and location. Taping and heat,
and a high dose of NSAID would be my first line of treatment. Take a look at the heel pain book on this web site

Re: barefoot

Nola M. on 10/30/01 at 19:49 (063846)

Thanks for your reply, Dr. Z. The Morton's foot I was referring to is apparently not the same as Morton's Neuroma. 'Morton's Foot' was defined as having a short big toe and the second toe being longer than the 'great' toe- the so-called 'Grecian' foot. (In my case, both the second and third toes are longer than the 'great' toe.) I've been told that this foot 'fault' causes the pressure in walking to go from the heel NOT to the first metatarsal, but to the second one, which is much narrower - this in turn allows the foot to flatten and pronate. I've also been told that I have 'weak' ankles which also causes pronation. That diagnosis is why I went to the orthotics. But apparently feet are complicated things - witness this web site. So I'll keep on trying using some of the exercises in the heel pain book.
Thanks.

Re: barefoot

Dr. Zuckerman on 10/27/01 at 23:54 (063702)

Hi

The use of the golf ball will only make the plantar fascia and surrounding tendons more inflamed. So stop that one. It is possible that your shoe
have placed pressure on the nerve in the front of the foot between the toes. This is called morton neuroma. So have that checked out.
The fact that you want to get your shoe off is one sign of this condiion

I would need to know more about your pain and location. Taping and heat,
and a high dose of NSAID would be my first line of treatment. Take a look at the heel pain book on this web site

Re: barefoot

Nola M. on 10/30/01 at 19:49 (063846)

Thanks for your reply, Dr. Z. The Morton's foot I was referring to is apparently not the same as Morton's Neuroma. 'Morton's Foot' was defined as having a short big toe and the second toe being longer than the 'great' toe- the so-called 'Grecian' foot. (In my case, both the second and third toes are longer than the 'great' toe.) I've been told that this foot 'fault' causes the pressure in walking to go from the heel NOT to the first metatarsal, but to the second one, which is much narrower - this in turn allows the foot to flatten and pronate. I've also been told that I have 'weak' ankles which also causes pronation. That diagnosis is why I went to the orthotics. But apparently feet are complicated things - witness this web site. So I'll keep on trying using some of the exercises in the heel pain book.
Thanks.