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Rest or Run???

Posted by Bob O. on 11/26/01 at 11:20 (065294)

I am a competitive runner (33 minute 10K - age 38) who had a flare up of heel pain. I was treated for P.F. about five years ago and haven't really had any significant heel pain since. About two months ago, I upped my speed training significantly and felt moderate heel pain after one of my workouts. I went to a local reputable podiatrist who told me I should consider getting into other sports since hard core running at my age will do so much damage. He then prescribed very hard and rigid orthotics. How much time should I take off from running? When I had reduced my mileage to half of what I was doing, about 30 miles a week now, I didn't have any significant reduction in morning tenderness. Did note a very slight reduction in pain during running. I am doing significant damage if I try to 'run' through this injury? My symptoms seem to mirror that of a bone spur. I do not have any pain in my plantar arch only in a small section of the front of the insertion point of my heel. I have been stretching and icing on a regular basis. I have ordered, and liked, the orthotics that were on your website for my runnning. I use the doctor prescribed one's for my other shoes.

Re: Rest or Run???

Ed Davis, DPM on 11/26/01 at 17:18 (065324)

Bob:
Pain is an indicator of inflammation and potential damage so I would not ignore it. Some level of physical activity can often be maintained with plantar fasciitis. One guage is to see how you feel the next day after activity. If the pain is not worse, then you probably have a level of activity that is not doing damage.

Cross training is always a good idea to maintain your fitness level and prevent muscle imbalances that can lead to injury. You may want to add a course of physical therapy to your treatment regimin.
Ed

Re: Rest or Run???

Ed Davis, DPM on 11/26/01 at 17:18 (065324)

Bob:
Pain is an indicator of inflammation and potential damage so I would not ignore it. Some level of physical activity can often be maintained with plantar fasciitis. One guage is to see how you feel the next day after activity. If the pain is not worse, then you probably have a level of activity that is not doing damage.

Cross training is always a good idea to maintain your fitness level and prevent muscle imbalances that can lead to injury. You may want to add a course of physical therapy to your treatment regimin.
Ed