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interesting physical therapist

Posted by paula on 12/01/01 at 17:29 (065842)

i wonder how many others here have post tib and don't know it. i thought i just had plantar fasciitis and achilles tendonitis and weak ankles and bad pronation for a long time but, indeed, turns out it was all being caused by the post tib. of course my case is different than others in that the post tib is severe and caused by a muscle wasting syndrome but still..... how many plantar fasciits cases are caused by weak posterior tibial tendons i wonder? my new pt is stressing post tib exercise, along with the peronial muscles and the ankles all in a non weight bearing way for now and feels real strong feet and ankles will solve the plantar fasciits and the achilles tendonitis along with orthotic plastic afos. which i got casted for on friday. just a little different way to go than a lot of folks here. but thought it might be worth thinking about for those who have suffered so long, so hard with no avail. (the afos are being made by an orthotist.}

Re: interesting physical therapist

elliott on 12/01/01 at 19:03 (065857)

Did you ever try those shoes I recommended? Orthotics generally won't work if they're not placed in the right kind of shoes. PT might not help either. You do a lot of walking in a day. A month or two in a better shoe might do you wonders.

Re: interesting physical therapist

Beverly on 12/03/01 at 15:04 (065996)

Paula,

What type of exercises does your PT have you doing that are for PTT?
Thanks,
Beverly

Re: new afo for posterial tib tendonitis

matts on 12/03/01 at 20:55 (066029)

This is the first time I have seen someone here mention an afo for ptt. I have had one for 3 weeks now and it really helps with pain reduction for what the orthopedist calls chronic posterial tibial tendonitis. The afo was made from a mold of my foot and ankle and is plastic and goes under the entire foot and up to a few inched below the knee, it has a hinge at the ankle joint. Is this the same thing you are talking about? It has been easier to get used to than any foot orthotic I have tried, but it does go up the leg which takes getting used to. I was told I would wear it for indefinite period of time, which means when I decide to have surgey on the tendon. I am starting to consider surgery now more seriously since I have been dealing with this for a couple of years.

i have been visiting and sometimes posting to this board foralmost that long, but mostly just read and learn from others. I tried pt but found when I went up to any weight bearing exercise at all the pain came back, I certaiinly hope you have better luck with pt, The ionpheris?? did help in the short term. Please post how the afo and pt work, Thanks for your post.

Re: new afo for posterial tib tendonitis

Bill D. on 12/04/01 at 19:38 (066144)

Hey Matts,
I too have been suffering with chronic ptt and/or tts for 7 years.(see my post 'My Story' from a few days ago. Sounds like we both have a similar condition.

No treatment or orthotic has helped. Also, like you, I can't do any weight bearing activity without causing much more pain. This has been so difficult for me since I like to exercise.

Have you had an MRI of you foot? Does it show scar tissue or a trapped nerve? Is your inner ankle swollen, puffy or tender to touch?

All of my diagnostic tests (MRI's, EMG's, X-RAY's ) do not show anything substantial enough for me to have surgery. I have been considering exploratory surgery as a last resort. Some doctors feel that surgery could make my pain worse. I feel though that I'm running out of options.

What is an afo?

Re: new afo for posterial tib tendonitis

matts on 12/04/01 at 20:55 (066155)

afo stands for ankle foot orthotic, the acutal perscrition said lower extremity articulate afo, it is plastic and goes from just below the knee to the end of the toes, with a hinge at the ankle joint. It is supposed to take some pressure off the post tib tendon and it must be doing that because it does help a lot with the pain, I think most people would call it a leg brace if you saw it.

Interesting on you tests, the mri showed some inflamation maybe fluid. I was referred to an ankle foot orthopedist by my podiatrist, who I really like, the ortho said he expected to see more fluid around the tendon than he did, especially after the exam. Unfortunatly the mri was 3 months old when I went to see him. I do not know if things can change that quick, but the pain was sure increasing during that time. So basically the xrays and mri I had were not to revealing either. I do not have any nerve problems now just tendon, the heel and nerve like pain went away for the most part after being on crutches and a cast several months ago. So I am lucky not to have nerve problems I am concerned that they will come back if I am not careful. the inside of the ankle does swell and is puffy along the tendon and can be very sensitive like you describe.

Re: interesting physical therapist

elliott on 12/01/01 at 19:03 (065857)

Did you ever try those shoes I recommended? Orthotics generally won't work if they're not placed in the right kind of shoes. PT might not help either. You do a lot of walking in a day. A month or two in a better shoe might do you wonders.

Re: interesting physical therapist

Beverly on 12/03/01 at 15:04 (065996)

Paula,

What type of exercises does your PT have you doing that are for PTT?
Thanks,
Beverly

Re: new afo for posterial tib tendonitis

matts on 12/03/01 at 20:55 (066029)

This is the first time I have seen someone here mention an afo for ptt. I have had one for 3 weeks now and it really helps with pain reduction for what the orthopedist calls chronic posterial tibial tendonitis. The afo was made from a mold of my foot and ankle and is plastic and goes under the entire foot and up to a few inched below the knee, it has a hinge at the ankle joint. Is this the same thing you are talking about? It has been easier to get used to than any foot orthotic I have tried, but it does go up the leg which takes getting used to. I was told I would wear it for indefinite period of time, which means when I decide to have surgey on the tendon. I am starting to consider surgery now more seriously since I have been dealing with this for a couple of years.

i have been visiting and sometimes posting to this board foralmost that long, but mostly just read and learn from others. I tried pt but found when I went up to any weight bearing exercise at all the pain came back, I certaiinly hope you have better luck with pt, The ionpheris?? did help in the short term. Please post how the afo and pt work, Thanks for your post.

Re: new afo for posterial tib tendonitis

Bill D. on 12/04/01 at 19:38 (066144)

Hey Matts,
I too have been suffering with chronic ptt and/or tts for 7 years.(see my post 'My Story' from a few days ago. Sounds like we both have a similar condition.

No treatment or orthotic has helped. Also, like you, I can't do any weight bearing activity without causing much more pain. This has been so difficult for me since I like to exercise.

Have you had an MRI of you foot? Does it show scar tissue or a trapped nerve? Is your inner ankle swollen, puffy or tender to touch?

All of my diagnostic tests (MRI's, EMG's, X-RAY's ) do not show anything substantial enough for me to have surgery. I have been considering exploratory surgery as a last resort. Some doctors feel that surgery could make my pain worse. I feel though that I'm running out of options.

What is an afo?

Re: new afo for posterial tib tendonitis

matts on 12/04/01 at 20:55 (066155)

afo stands for ankle foot orthotic, the acutal perscrition said lower extremity articulate afo, it is plastic and goes from just below the knee to the end of the toes, with a hinge at the ankle joint. It is supposed to take some pressure off the post tib tendon and it must be doing that because it does help a lot with the pain, I think most people would call it a leg brace if you saw it.

Interesting on you tests, the mri showed some inflamation maybe fluid. I was referred to an ankle foot orthopedist by my podiatrist, who I really like, the ortho said he expected to see more fluid around the tendon than he did, especially after the exam. Unfortunatly the mri was 3 months old when I went to see him. I do not know if things can change that quick, but the pain was sure increasing during that time. So basically the xrays and mri I had were not to revealing either. I do not have any nerve problems now just tendon, the heel and nerve like pain went away for the most part after being on crutches and a cast several months ago. So I am lucky not to have nerve problems I am concerned that they will come back if I am not careful. the inside of the ankle does swell and is puffy along the tendon and can be very sensitive like you describe.