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Someone Please define "REST"

Posted by rebecca h on 12/07/01 at 20:37 (066485)

Okay, I know from reading Scotts heel pain book that resting is very important. I would like to know exactly what kind of rest this means. I have alot of trouble staying off my feet... There are still sinkfuls of dishes that need washing. How can I let them stay there overnight and grow bacteria! There are still loads of laundry to be taken up and down the basement stairs. And of course there is always my two year old to chase down so he won't draw on the T.V. with a marker, eat stuff that shouldn't be eaten... etc. Does rest mean 'off your feet except to walk to the bathroom' Help!!!!! I really need to understand... THANKS (My husband helps alot but he has a job that keeps him very busy at very unpredictable times so he cannot be here all the time.)

Re: Someone Please define "REST"

Carole C on 12/07/01 at 21:08 (066490)

Rebecca, it's got to be so frustrating to try to rest with a toddler in the house. I am having trouble resting, and just live by myself! I'm not coping very well, and today washed my dishes and my clothing (so tomorrow will probably pay for that!)

Try to use paper plates and cups if you can, and plastic 'silverware', so you can dispose of these things instead of having to wash them. Your husband can really help a lot by taking out the extra trash that is accumulated this way.

Maybe your husband can also help taking clothes up and down the stair; that has got to be very rough on your PF too.

The more you can rest your feet, and stay off of them, the faster they will heal. I can definitely notice a difference between times when I am off my feet except to go to the bathroom and times like today when I simply must do dishes and laundry. And, I can notice a difference between days like today and days when I go to the grocery store. Even on days when I am resigned to stay off my feet completely except for bathroom visits, I can notice a difference if I stay close to the bathroom so that I don't have to walk so far.

You do have to do some things, but try to think of ways to reduce your time on your feet. If you have relatives nearby that could watch your child more frequently, now is the time to ask.

I wish I could say, 'don't bother trying', but I think it's just going to be a lot harder for you and it's important to try to stay optimistic and keep thinking about ways to reduce your time on your feet. Maybe your husband would take your toddler off your hands for a day on the weekend, to go and have some quality time on some sort of outing that both enjoy. If you get some 'time off', don't spend it doing laundry and washing dishes! Just let that slide, ask him to pick up paper plates and food on the way home, and rest your feet. Good luck to you! We understand, and we care!

Carole C

Re: Someone Please define "REST"

Julie on 12/08/01 at 02:15 (066498)

This is one of those how-long-is-a-piece-of-string questions. Resting has to mean different things to different people in different circumstances. People with young children surely must have a harder time resting their feet than most. But Rebecca, don't I recall your saying that you don't just have an active two-year-old and a working husband, you have four children of various ages up to 16? (Please correct me if I'm wrong).

Now is the perfect time to change their 'let mom do everything' mind-set: not just for your feet's sake for everyone's long term benefit.

Muster the troops. Call a family gathering and make it very clear to everyone, your husband and all the children, that you don't just have a niggling pain in the tootsies that can be ignored by everyone while you soldier on as normal, but a serious, potentially chronic, disabling condition that will get worse if you don't stay off your feet as much as possible. If you need extra ammunition, show them some posts from long-time sufferers on this message board.

Put them in charge of as many of the household chores as possible. They can wash the dishes. And dry them and put them away (a few breakages are of no consequence compared to your health). And carry laundry up and down the stairs. And turn on the washing machine. They can help with the cooking, at least with preparation, like chopping vegetables. They can set the table and clear it after meals.

I mean, of course, that they're perfectly capable of doing these things, but if they've grown up expecting you to do everything, never expecting anything of them, you will have to ask them to change, to help, and explain clearly why you need them to.

Barb recently told us that she plays a wonderful game with her little ones called 'Be my hands' and gets them to run around picking things up for her. So you can even enlist the two-year-old, who will probably be only too delighted to help mommy. And the older ones can be asked to help out with toddler-monitoring duties when they're around.

Having PF demands a good deal of rethinking of one's life. In the early stages, you don't think about changing your life, you just carry on hoping the pain will go away, not wanting to let it rule your life. But eventually there has to be a mental shift, because it has to be taken seriously if it isn't to become chronic. That means changing. Not just you, your family too. So make it a family project: getting mom's feet better.

On another tack: you'll have read in the heel pain book that Scott says taping is one of the best methods of resting the plantar fascxia. This is because it takes over the job of supporting the arch that the injured, weakened fascia can no longer do. Have you tried it yet? I think I've told you before that it was a great help to me for several months while I was dealing with my PF. I know that others feel that orthotics, if you have them, are sufficient, but I found the combination of the two both necessary and effective.

I take it you have a good podiatrist whom you trust and has got you started on a treatment regime, and who is monitoring your progress? This is important. Please be optimistic. Most cases of PF get better with conservative treatment. With help from your family and your pod, yours will be one of them.

Re: Someone Please define "REST"

rebecca h on 12/08/01 at 08:33 (066504)

Julie,

Very good advice. I've always believed it important for children to have chores and they have been required to do certain things around the house.
They are 15 (boy) 11 (girl) 9 (boy) 6 (boy) and 2 (boy). My oldest (15) has been in Europe since August. He will be coming home on Dec. 21. He can handle the biggest jobs (Laundry , Large Pots and Pans, Big Loads of Laundry, etc.) My 11-year-old is small for her age and can't handle the bigger stuff but is very helpful in other ways when she is here such as reading books to my 2 yr old, preparing meals and straightening up. My 9-yr-old is good at sweeping, cleaning up messes, clearing the counters, playing loud exciting boy games with the 2 year old. My six year old can clear the table and play with his younger brother. I think I will have that talk with them that you suggested. Maybe if I put it the right way they will feel the imortance of their part in the mission to get Mama well.

I have been taping my feet. I'm not sure if its helping or not. I think I am doing it correctly (scott's way) I will keep on doing it.

I do have a podiatrist that seems to be a good one. He made custom orthotics which I am trying to get used to. He said to break them in for three weeks before evaluating them. At this point I am not satisfied with them but maybe by then they will feel better. He did say he wanted the treat my pf conservatively so that makes me feel confident so far that he has my best interests in mind. Also he is a good listener and I don't feel rushed. The only unusual thing about my pf is that I also have alot of pain in my forefeet. I may need to have an MRI to see if there are fractures.

Well, thank you again for writing and I hope you are well!

rebecca

Re: Someone Please define "REST"

Julie on 12/08/01 at 08:50 (066505)

If your kids are already used to doing chores around the house, you've got a very good base to build on in an Involve the Family in the Healing Process Project. Best of luck with it. I'm sure you'll put it in the right way and that they'll be proud and glad to help you.

I can't remember how long you've had your foot problems, but have a feeling you started dealing with them fairly quickly, which is a good thing: the longer you wait to start treating PF, the longer it takes to heal. In any case, healing will take time and you must be patient. When I was going through it last year I decided that the 'lesson' of PF for me was - Patience. It was a lesson I needed to learn. I'm still not a particularly patient person, but I did learn to be patient with my foot and was quite proud of that at the time.

Taping should make an immediate difference in your pain level. If you're not sure, it's possible that you haven't got the tension quite right. This can be tricky, and needs a bit of experimentation: it should be tight enough to give support, not so tight that it hurts when you stand up. Which technique are you using?

Re: Someone Please define "REST"

John h on 12/08/01 at 09:21 (066508)

Any wife needing complete rest needs me for a spouse.

Re: Someone Please define "REST"

Carole C on 12/08/01 at 09:28 (066513)

John, your wife is a lucky woman!

As for me, I have been enjoying LOTS more rest since my divorce and since moving into an apartment instead of a house. Being a wife and mother (even without four kids!) and taking care of a whole household is more challenging than being an Olympic contender, in my opinion! :)

Carole C

Re: Julie-taping

rebecca h on 12/08/01 at 10:30 (066517)

I'm using Scott's basic four pieces of tape. Trying to follow picturs as best I can...

rebecca

Re: Someone Please define "REST"

Steve P on 12/08/01 at 10:42 (066519)

Rebecca --- Excellent comments above by all.

I would just add that outside chores are important too. Those kids can definitely rake leaves in the fall & cut grass in the summer. Teach your 15 year old & 11 year old how to trim schrubs, water the lawn, etc.

As Julie says, this is serious business & your kids need to fully appreciate the importance & do everything they can.

Re: good idea carole

rebecca h on 12/08/01 at 11:15 (066521)

I LIKE YOUR IDEA ABOUT DISPOSABLE DISHES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I will consider it a medical expense!

Re: Someone Please define "REST"

JudyS on 12/08/01 at 11:15 (066522)

Another idea, Rebecca, is to wear a removable cast, air cast, night splint, etc, as much as possible and use crutches as much as possible. There is an ulterior motive in this.....it gives your beautiful family visual reinforcement that there really is a serious problem with your foot and, for them, translates in to a desire to help.

Re: good idea carole

Carole C on 12/08/01 at 11:17 (066524)

Yes! You could even write it off on your taxes!!!!!

(smile) I'm so glad I thought of something helpful, especially for you! Your ideas have helped my a whole lot. Well, I'm off to meet my lunch date.

Carole C

Re: Julie-taping

Julie on 12/08/01 at 11:55 (066527)

Rebecca, I used, with good effect, an even simpler method (and cheaper, being less tape-intensive) the simplest Scott illustrates, of two strips of tape connecting the ball of the foot and the heel. I didn't cross them over, just overlapped them slightly.

It's the tension that's important. Experiment with applying tape at various tensions until you feel that it's supportive when you stand up and walk, but not painful.

It's important that you use a good quality tape. The cheaper ones can stretch and lose their tension quickly, which defeats the purpose. I think I mentioned Leuko tape to you. It's made by Beiersdorf, is widely available here in England but perhaps not so much in the States. John H posted a website link where you can buy it on line.

John? Have you still got it?

Re: Someone Please define "REST"

Beverly on 12/08/01 at 13:46 (066530)

Rebecca,

I would definitely try to eliminate those stairs as much as possible... really bad for PF. Do you have a two story house with the bedrooms upstairs or do you mean going down into the basement to do laundry? I'm glad your kids are old enough to help out.

I have a stool in the kitchen... two different heights. It helps me quite a bit when going through a bad spell.

Best wishes,
Beverly

Re: Beverly-I have both

rebecca h on 12/08/01 at 14:01 (066532)

Beverly,

I have both. We live in a two story house with a basement. The stairs that go from first floor to second are steep, curve and are carpeted. The ones leading to the basement (where the washer and dryer are) are straight and made of wood. There is a banister though which helps. Recently I have been going down those by sitting on one step,easing down to the next while holding on to the banister so as to not put too much weight on my feet.

I'll check in to the two-height stool. Sounds like it might help in the kitchen.

Thanks, and hope your feet are feeling better today!

rebecca

Re: Judy -night splints

rebecca h on 12/08/01 at 14:09 (066533)

Judy,

I've thought about getting night splints but would need them for both feet. I've already spent so much money on shoes, shoes, shoes, shoes, inserts, inserts, inserts, doctors, doctors, doctors and with Christmas coming our budget is stretched to the limit. Maybe after the Christmas financial crunch I can invest in some. They sound like they would really help. And maybe they would be the answer for me. Do you have PF in both feet? I do. Crutches sound like they would help for one but not two. I've thought of using a wheelchair to get around the house but we're a little cramped for space. Of course being in a wheelchair sends a message too! : )

Thanks and hope your feet are doing well today.
rebecca

Re: Julie-taping

John h on 12/08/01 at 14:20 (066535)

I am with Julie on the two strip method of taping. It is simple and easy which makes you more likely to stick with it. Our only difference is I use the more fashionalble flesh toned tape to go with my bronze like skin while Julie uses the white britsh (no sun) skin toned tape. The URL for purchasing the Leuko Tape which Julie recommeded and I highly recommend is: http://www.ptcatalog.com

order their catalog. it is great and free. the tape you are looking for is Leuko tape P Sports tape 1 1/2' x 15 yds @ $7.75. You can also call toll free to order at 1-800-523-0914

Re: Judy -night splints

JudyS on 12/08/01 at 18:13 (066545)

Yes, Rebecca, I have PF in both feet. When I used the crutches I either stayed off the worse of the two or alternated. Many, many folks here have been helped tremendously by night splints. I believe the blue Johnson & Johnson's here on Scott's site are the most popular but I could be off on that. Would your insurance cover their cost if they were prescribed by your doctor?

Re: Judy -night splints

Beverly on 12/09/01 at 12:00 (066571)

Rebecca,

Opps. What I meant is that I have two stools. They are different heights.

Wow. Girl. I feel for you. I can't imagine having to climb stairs such as you've described everyday.

Crutches were not a good thing for me. My first doctor put me on them over the phone during a flair up. I have PF bilaterally. I don't think I used them correctly, and I made myself worse. Plus, it reactivated an old neck/shoulder injury. In retrospect, I wish I had gotten proper instructions on how to use crutches by a physical therapist or by the doctor.

Good luck,
Beverly

Re: Judy -night splints

John h on 12/09/01 at 13:39 (066583)

Judy: no one ever explained crutch use to me either. When I went on the net I found an amazing number of sites devoted to explaining how to use crutches. You would think each doctor would have a handout for his patients who need crutches. I took one set of instructions to my doctor and he said he would adapt it in his practice.

Re: Bi-laterial PF

john h on 12/13/01 at 10:12 (066875)

Bi-laterial PF still defies logic to me! I have it and it still makes no sense that you would develop an inflamation/tear/whatever in both feet at the same time. Yes, we can present some possible explanations but with so many people having bi-laterial PF it would make sense that there is some other common denominator rather than a tear or inflamation that would cause this statistical anomality. I can see developing PF in the second foot after a few months,etc but both of my feet developed PF within a week of each other. Of course PF of any sort defies treatmnet and logic.

Re: Bi-laterial PF

Carole C on 12/13/01 at 16:27 (066902)

This is an interesting question to wonder about. Here are some of my speculations regarding the frequent occurrence of bilateral PF.

PF in the second foot could be due to the abnormalities in gait arising from pain in the first foot. This could cause tearing in the second foot later on.

A second possibility is that the initial injury could have occurred in both feet but might not become painful immediately in the second foot. Maybe it has only torn a relatively small amount, at first. As the less injured second foot tissues start to tear further, the pain would become noticeable in it too.

Carole C

Re: Bi-laterial PF

Glenn X on 12/14/01 at 14:39 (066966)

John: I think what nailed me with Bi was treating the good foot the same as the sore foot. Over-stretching and overly hard orthotics in particular . . . and also the lack of full activity that gradually worked to lessen my good foot's flexibility and resistence.

Re: Bi-laterial PF

Carole C on 12/14/01 at 16:04 (066976)

That is probably it. I didn't think about that, but the lack of full activity must play a tremendous role in this. Good point!

Carole C

Re: Someone Please define "REST"

Carole C on 12/07/01 at 21:08 (066490)

Rebecca, it's got to be so frustrating to try to rest with a toddler in the house. I am having trouble resting, and just live by myself! I'm not coping very well, and today washed my dishes and my clothing (so tomorrow will probably pay for that!)

Try to use paper plates and cups if you can, and plastic 'silverware', so you can dispose of these things instead of having to wash them. Your husband can really help a lot by taking out the extra trash that is accumulated this way.

Maybe your husband can also help taking clothes up and down the stair; that has got to be very rough on your PF too.

The more you can rest your feet, and stay off of them, the faster they will heal. I can definitely notice a difference between times when I am off my feet except to go to the bathroom and times like today when I simply must do dishes and laundry. And, I can notice a difference between days like today and days when I go to the grocery store. Even on days when I am resigned to stay off my feet completely except for bathroom visits, I can notice a difference if I stay close to the bathroom so that I don't have to walk so far.

You do have to do some things, but try to think of ways to reduce your time on your feet. If you have relatives nearby that could watch your child more frequently, now is the time to ask.

I wish I could say, 'don't bother trying', but I think it's just going to be a lot harder for you and it's important to try to stay optimistic and keep thinking about ways to reduce your time on your feet. Maybe your husband would take your toddler off your hands for a day on the weekend, to go and have some quality time on some sort of outing that both enjoy. If you get some 'time off', don't spend it doing laundry and washing dishes! Just let that slide, ask him to pick up paper plates and food on the way home, and rest your feet. Good luck to you! We understand, and we care!

Carole C

Re: Someone Please define "REST"

Julie on 12/08/01 at 02:15 (066498)

This is one of those how-long-is-a-piece-of-string questions. Resting has to mean different things to different people in different circumstances. People with young children surely must have a harder time resting their feet than most. But Rebecca, don't I recall your saying that you don't just have an active two-year-old and a working husband, you have four children of various ages up to 16? (Please correct me if I'm wrong).

Now is the perfect time to change their 'let mom do everything' mind-set: not just for your feet's sake for everyone's long term benefit.

Muster the troops. Call a family gathering and make it very clear to everyone, your husband and all the children, that you don't just have a niggling pain in the tootsies that can be ignored by everyone while you soldier on as normal, but a serious, potentially chronic, disabling condition that will get worse if you don't stay off your feet as much as possible. If you need extra ammunition, show them some posts from long-time sufferers on this message board.

Put them in charge of as many of the household chores as possible. They can wash the dishes. And dry them and put them away (a few breakages are of no consequence compared to your health). And carry laundry up and down the stairs. And turn on the washing machine. They can help with the cooking, at least with preparation, like chopping vegetables. They can set the table and clear it after meals.

I mean, of course, that they're perfectly capable of doing these things, but if they've grown up expecting you to do everything, never expecting anything of them, you will have to ask them to change, to help, and explain clearly why you need them to.

Barb recently told us that she plays a wonderful game with her little ones called 'Be my hands' and gets them to run around picking things up for her. So you can even enlist the two-year-old, who will probably be only too delighted to help mommy. And the older ones can be asked to help out with toddler-monitoring duties when they're around.

Having PF demands a good deal of rethinking of one's life. In the early stages, you don't think about changing your life, you just carry on hoping the pain will go away, not wanting to let it rule your life. But eventually there has to be a mental shift, because it has to be taken seriously if it isn't to become chronic. That means changing. Not just you, your family too. So make it a family project: getting mom's feet better.

On another tack: you'll have read in the heel pain book that Scott says taping is one of the best methods of resting the plantar fascxia. This is because it takes over the job of supporting the arch that the injured, weakened fascia can no longer do. Have you tried it yet? I think I've told you before that it was a great help to me for several months while I was dealing with my PF. I know that others feel that orthotics, if you have them, are sufficient, but I found the combination of the two both necessary and effective.

I take it you have a good podiatrist whom you trust and has got you started on a treatment regime, and who is monitoring your progress? This is important. Please be optimistic. Most cases of PF get better with conservative treatment. With help from your family and your pod, yours will be one of them.

Re: Someone Please define "REST"

rebecca h on 12/08/01 at 08:33 (066504)

Julie,

Very good advice. I've always believed it important for children to have chores and they have been required to do certain things around the house.
They are 15 (boy) 11 (girl) 9 (boy) 6 (boy) and 2 (boy). My oldest (15) has been in Europe since August. He will be coming home on Dec. 21. He can handle the biggest jobs (Laundry , Large Pots and Pans, Big Loads of Laundry, etc.) My 11-year-old is small for her age and can't handle the bigger stuff but is very helpful in other ways when she is here such as reading books to my 2 yr old, preparing meals and straightening up. My 9-yr-old is good at sweeping, cleaning up messes, clearing the counters, playing loud exciting boy games with the 2 year old. My six year old can clear the table and play with his younger brother. I think I will have that talk with them that you suggested. Maybe if I put it the right way they will feel the imortance of their part in the mission to get Mama well.

I have been taping my feet. I'm not sure if its helping or not. I think I am doing it correctly (scott's way) I will keep on doing it.

I do have a podiatrist that seems to be a good one. He made custom orthotics which I am trying to get used to. He said to break them in for three weeks before evaluating them. At this point I am not satisfied with them but maybe by then they will feel better. He did say he wanted the treat my pf conservatively so that makes me feel confident so far that he has my best interests in mind. Also he is a good listener and I don't feel rushed. The only unusual thing about my pf is that I also have alot of pain in my forefeet. I may need to have an MRI to see if there are fractures.

Well, thank you again for writing and I hope you are well!

rebecca

Re: Someone Please define "REST"

Julie on 12/08/01 at 08:50 (066505)

If your kids are already used to doing chores around the house, you've got a very good base to build on in an Involve the Family in the Healing Process Project. Best of luck with it. I'm sure you'll put it in the right way and that they'll be proud and glad to help you.

I can't remember how long you've had your foot problems, but have a feeling you started dealing with them fairly quickly, which is a good thing: the longer you wait to start treating PF, the longer it takes to heal. In any case, healing will take time and you must be patient. When I was going through it last year I decided that the 'lesson' of PF for me was - Patience. It was a lesson I needed to learn. I'm still not a particularly patient person, but I did learn to be patient with my foot and was quite proud of that at the time.

Taping should make an immediate difference in your pain level. If you're not sure, it's possible that you haven't got the tension quite right. This can be tricky, and needs a bit of experimentation: it should be tight enough to give support, not so tight that it hurts when you stand up. Which technique are you using?

Re: Someone Please define "REST"

John h on 12/08/01 at 09:21 (066508)

Any wife needing complete rest needs me for a spouse.

Re: Someone Please define "REST"

Carole C on 12/08/01 at 09:28 (066513)

John, your wife is a lucky woman!

As for me, I have been enjoying LOTS more rest since my divorce and since moving into an apartment instead of a house. Being a wife and mother (even without four kids!) and taking care of a whole household is more challenging than being an Olympic contender, in my opinion! :)

Carole C

Re: Julie-taping

rebecca h on 12/08/01 at 10:30 (066517)

I'm using Scott's basic four pieces of tape. Trying to follow picturs as best I can...

rebecca

Re: Someone Please define "REST"

Steve P on 12/08/01 at 10:42 (066519)

Rebecca --- Excellent comments above by all.

I would just add that outside chores are important too. Those kids can definitely rake leaves in the fall & cut grass in the summer. Teach your 15 year old & 11 year old how to trim schrubs, water the lawn, etc.

As Julie says, this is serious business & your kids need to fully appreciate the importance & do everything they can.

Re: good idea carole

rebecca h on 12/08/01 at 11:15 (066521)

I LIKE YOUR IDEA ABOUT DISPOSABLE DISHES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I will consider it a medical expense!

Re: Someone Please define "REST"

JudyS on 12/08/01 at 11:15 (066522)

Another idea, Rebecca, is to wear a removable cast, air cast, night splint, etc, as much as possible and use crutches as much as possible. There is an ulterior motive in this.....it gives your beautiful family visual reinforcement that there really is a serious problem with your foot and, for them, translates in to a desire to help.

Re: good idea carole

Carole C on 12/08/01 at 11:17 (066524)

Yes! You could even write it off on your taxes!!!!!

(smile) I'm so glad I thought of something helpful, especially for you! Your ideas have helped my a whole lot. Well, I'm off to meet my lunch date.

Carole C

Re: Julie-taping

Julie on 12/08/01 at 11:55 (066527)

Rebecca, I used, with good effect, an even simpler method (and cheaper, being less tape-intensive) the simplest Scott illustrates, of two strips of tape connecting the ball of the foot and the heel. I didn't cross them over, just overlapped them slightly.

It's the tension that's important. Experiment with applying tape at various tensions until you feel that it's supportive when you stand up and walk, but not painful.

It's important that you use a good quality tape. The cheaper ones can stretch and lose their tension quickly, which defeats the purpose. I think I mentioned Leuko tape to you. It's made by Beiersdorf, is widely available here in England but perhaps not so much in the States. John H posted a website link where you can buy it on line.

John? Have you still got it?

Re: Someone Please define "REST"

Beverly on 12/08/01 at 13:46 (066530)

Rebecca,

I would definitely try to eliminate those stairs as much as possible... really bad for PF. Do you have a two story house with the bedrooms upstairs or do you mean going down into the basement to do laundry? I'm glad your kids are old enough to help out.

I have a stool in the kitchen... two different heights. It helps me quite a bit when going through a bad spell.

Best wishes,
Beverly

Re: Beverly-I have both

rebecca h on 12/08/01 at 14:01 (066532)

Beverly,

I have both. We live in a two story house with a basement. The stairs that go from first floor to second are steep, curve and are carpeted. The ones leading to the basement (where the washer and dryer are) are straight and made of wood. There is a banister though which helps. Recently I have been going down those by sitting on one step,easing down to the next while holding on to the banister so as to not put too much weight on my feet.

I'll check in to the two-height stool. Sounds like it might help in the kitchen.

Thanks, and hope your feet are feeling better today!

rebecca

Re: Judy -night splints

rebecca h on 12/08/01 at 14:09 (066533)

Judy,

I've thought about getting night splints but would need them for both feet. I've already spent so much money on shoes, shoes, shoes, shoes, inserts, inserts, inserts, doctors, doctors, doctors and with Christmas coming our budget is stretched to the limit. Maybe after the Christmas financial crunch I can invest in some. They sound like they would really help. And maybe they would be the answer for me. Do you have PF in both feet? I do. Crutches sound like they would help for one but not two. I've thought of using a wheelchair to get around the house but we're a little cramped for space. Of course being in a wheelchair sends a message too! : )

Thanks and hope your feet are doing well today.
rebecca

Re: Julie-taping

John h on 12/08/01 at 14:20 (066535)

I am with Julie on the two strip method of taping. It is simple and easy which makes you more likely to stick with it. Our only difference is I use the more fashionalble flesh toned tape to go with my bronze like skin while Julie uses the white britsh (no sun) skin toned tape. The URL for purchasing the Leuko Tape which Julie recommeded and I highly recommend is: http://www.ptcatalog.com

order their catalog. it is great and free. the tape you are looking for is Leuko tape P Sports tape 1 1/2' x 15 yds @ $7.75. You can also call toll free to order at 1-800-523-0914

Re: Judy -night splints

JudyS on 12/08/01 at 18:13 (066545)

Yes, Rebecca, I have PF in both feet. When I used the crutches I either stayed off the worse of the two or alternated. Many, many folks here have been helped tremendously by night splints. I believe the blue Johnson & Johnson's here on Scott's site are the most popular but I could be off on that. Would your insurance cover their cost if they were prescribed by your doctor?

Re: Judy -night splints

Beverly on 12/09/01 at 12:00 (066571)

Rebecca,

Opps. What I meant is that I have two stools. They are different heights.

Wow. Girl. I feel for you. I can't imagine having to climb stairs such as you've described everyday.

Crutches were not a good thing for me. My first doctor put me on them over the phone during a flair up. I have PF bilaterally. I don't think I used them correctly, and I made myself worse. Plus, it reactivated an old neck/shoulder injury. In retrospect, I wish I had gotten proper instructions on how to use crutches by a physical therapist or by the doctor.

Good luck,
Beverly

Re: Judy -night splints

John h on 12/09/01 at 13:39 (066583)

Judy: no one ever explained crutch use to me either. When I went on the net I found an amazing number of sites devoted to explaining how to use crutches. You would think each doctor would have a handout for his patients who need crutches. I took one set of instructions to my doctor and he said he would adapt it in his practice.

Re: Bi-laterial PF

john h on 12/13/01 at 10:12 (066875)

Bi-laterial PF still defies logic to me! I have it and it still makes no sense that you would develop an inflamation/tear/whatever in both feet at the same time. Yes, we can present some possible explanations but with so many people having bi-laterial PF it would make sense that there is some other common denominator rather than a tear or inflamation that would cause this statistical anomality. I can see developing PF in the second foot after a few months,etc but both of my feet developed PF within a week of each other. Of course PF of any sort defies treatmnet and logic.

Re: Bi-laterial PF

Carole C on 12/13/01 at 16:27 (066902)

This is an interesting question to wonder about. Here are some of my speculations regarding the frequent occurrence of bilateral PF.

PF in the second foot could be due to the abnormalities in gait arising from pain in the first foot. This could cause tearing in the second foot later on.

A second possibility is that the initial injury could have occurred in both feet but might not become painful immediately in the second foot. Maybe it has only torn a relatively small amount, at first. As the less injured second foot tissues start to tear further, the pain would become noticeable in it too.

Carole C

Re: Bi-laterial PF

Glenn X on 12/14/01 at 14:39 (066966)

John: I think what nailed me with Bi was treating the good foot the same as the sore foot. Over-stretching and overly hard orthotics in particular . . . and also the lack of full activity that gradually worked to lessen my good foot's flexibility and resistence.

Re: Bi-laterial PF

Carole C on 12/14/01 at 16:04 (066976)

That is probably it. I didn't think about that, but the lack of full activity must play a tremendous role in this. Good point!

Carole C