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CHANGE OF SHOES/ORTHOTIC STYLES FOR COMFORT REASONS?

Posted by RACHAEL T. on 12/15/01 at 14:04 (067054)

Has anyone found that a change of shoes thru the day or every so many days has helped them to find 'less pain' & more comfort? I have realized that I did this 'before' pf & didn't understand that it WAS the onset of pf. At this point in my healing process, I have found once again - that 'change' was good from time to time. Is this common with any of you? It seems as though I go from my 'house Birks' to New Balances or Asics or back & forth..... is this just me or you too??? (Some days what seemed most comfy for me is the worst the next week!)

Re: Yes, this can feel good :)

Carole C on 12/15/01 at 14:29 (067057)

Sure, I read somewhere that one of the best things we can do for PF is to get new shoes, or start wearing different shoes. Each time that I have, I've felt more comfortable for a few days. My 'Florida' Birks were like a miracle until Day 5 of break-in. Last Monday I got new custom orthotics and new SAS shoes to put them in, and they are still doing really well today (Day 6).

I presently switch to my Birks for a few hours in the evenings. I think this change each day helps me to rest my feet a little. When/if I need to, I plan to get some different Birks. Maybe some of the high arch variety, in the Tatami line. Also, I want to try Arizonas sometime just because they work so well for everyone.

We have to keep trying different things and doing our best to heal our PF. My thoughts are that we should make sure that anything we put on our feet is good for them and not going to make things worse.

In my case, I don't plan to put anything on my feet that doesn't have major arch support. I don't think I can wear my Floridas all day any more, because they don't really seem to have enough arch support for me right now(although they are better than conventional shoes). Or, maybe I need new Birks that are more expertly fitted at a Birkenstock store (instead of a department store) now that I can get around well enough to get to one.

Carole C

Re: Yes, this can feel good :)

RACHAEL T. on 12/15/01 at 16:32 (067068)

Yes, thanks for your reply! My Birks are Boston clogs & I didn't think clogs would be supportive enough but they are. And, they are my rest from my tennis shoes, I guess. I hear good things on SAS - clue me in please.....Stay in touch! I had ESWT (Dornier) 3 wks. ago & my pain level has dropped ALOT! I know pf is still lurking though - but it doesn't hit me as strongly when I do feel its presence.

Re: Yes, this can feel good :)

Carole C on 12/15/01 at 17:02 (067073)

When my pedorthist made my custom orthotics last Monday, she put them in some SAS shoes that she sells, without asking me, and told me this is what I'd wear. Well, she gave me a choice of white, tan, or black, but that was it! That was probably a good thing because they are working very well for me. These particular shoes have a lot more room for the orthotic than any other shoe I've ever had, and the orthotic that she made needs a whole lot of room. I feel the shoes are huge and clunky but they are ok for my job. They are very soft, but they are also thick and I feel they provide a lot of support around my heel and the sides of the shoes (and the orthotic provides plenty for my arches). Here's a photo of me and my new SAS shoes:

http://members.home.net/louisel19/shoes.html

It's hard to get a sense of how BIG they are from the photo, though.

My previous shoes were some old worn-out SAS shoes too, which I bought years and years ago when I lived in Texas. I didn't know where to buy new ones here, or I would have. You can't buy them online, and I can't even find any photos of them online. The only way I know of to buy SAS shoes in New Orleans is to either accidently find them at a store, or to go to my pedorthist! LOL

I hope that your tennis shoes give you a lot of arch support and are a good shape, or else that you are using an orthotic in them.

I am so glad to hear about your ESWT working so well! It's encouraging to hear about it. I have not had it or any surgery, because I'm fairly new at this and trying my first orthotics at the moment, and ice, rest, stretching, and so on.

Carole C

Re: Yes, this can feel good :)

RACHAEL T. on 12/15/01 at 22:29 (067090)

Hi again Carol, Saw your 'pretty is as pretty feels' picture & actually they look like a tennis shoe in black! They aren'tclunkier looking than a Birk! Anyway, yes, I've an orthotic in my sneakers & usually wear Asics or New Balance & when at work, I wear an Ariat Boot , again with an insert......Thanks for the insight on the SAS! How long have you been in the PF world....I have been there since April, 2001! & that is quite long enough! smiling as I type that!

Re: CHANGE OF SHOES/ORTHOTIC STYLES FOR COMFORT REASONS?

nancy s. on 12/15/01 at 22:33 (067091)

rachael, after two and a half years of pf and other foot problems, and finally becoming much better, i still find what you write to be true. as an example, i had a busy day yesterday and i needed to wear three different pairs of shoes for different aspects of it:
(1) started out wearing my new balance 608s for a mile-plus walk on the beach.
(2) had to switch to my regular-footbed boston birks immediately after, because for some reason i can only walk at a good clip in athletic shoes -- can't walk really slowly or stand around in them. wore those bostons for an inaugural-train festivity and then to do some shopping.
(3) came home and my heels were sore. switched to my soft-footbed boston birks to attend a stand-around party, and they felt great and got me through the evening just fine.
i'll probably have to switch like this for the rest of my life. when pf first struck, i thought sticking inserts into my shoes first thing in the morning was a big pain in the *#%. What a spoiled brat, eh? now i have to do so much more, but am just grateful it all usually works and i no longer find any of it a pain -- as long as i can walk and don't HAVE much pain! good luck to you....
nancy

Re: Yes, this can feel good :)

Carole C on 12/15/01 at 23:00 (067093)

Hi Rachael. I am very new to PF. I never had a foot problem in my whole life of 53 years, until this fall, other than blisters and stepping on things and so on. I grew up in Hawaii and often would walk many miles barefoot with never the slightest problem, when I was young. I had healthy, strong feet then. Lots of me was healthier then than it is now! LOL Such is life.

On September 22, 2001 I got PF. It was diagnosed on November 21st along with great big ol' heelspurs on the x-ray. So for me it's not yet been even three months, and I'm already sick of it and depressed a lot. I did get to this site pretty quickly, and I got my orthotics last Monday so that was less than three months after my first symptoms. Back in September and early October my feet didn't seem that bad, but that didn't last.

Thanks for the nice words about my SAS shoes, but one of these days I'll have to photograph them with my previous SAS shoes or my Birks in the photo, so people can truly get a sense of how HUGE these are compared to what I normally wear. But they do seem to fit me very well, and to protect my foot and provide it with the support it needs. Wearing them sort of feels like wearing two army tanks. It would be really hard for me to hurt my feet any further in them! They are soft, too.

I'm glad you have good sneakers with an orthotic in them. I wasn't sure. That sounds like a good set-up. :)

Carole C

Re: Yes, this can feel good :)

Gloria U on 12/17/01 at 07:28 (067176)

I also wear orthodics in my sneakers at all times but was very interested in the SAS shoes. I have never heard of these and would probably like a pair instead of wearing sneakers all the time. Does SAS stand for andthing in particular? Do you know what kind of shoe store carries them?
I have had PF for years after I broke my ankle. Now, I have a fallen arch in my right foot and they do want to do surgery and I do not want that at all. The thought of being in a cast for 10 weeks makes me crazy. It must be the magic age of early 50's that make our feet go out of wack!!!

Gloria U

Re: SAS shoes; Early 50's and PF

Carole C on 12/17/01 at 07:56 (067179)

SAS stands for San Antonio Shoes. They are made in San Antonio, Texas. Here in New Orleans it seems very hard to find SAS shoes. I have not seen any in the stores, but that doesn't mean they aren't here. I just haven't been able to find any. I got my new pair of SAS shoes from my pedorthist, who sells this brand and a few others.

Before that, I got my previous pair of SAS shoes from a shoe store in College Station, Texas that sells a wide variety very high quality shoes as well as orthopedic shoes. If you live near there I can give you the name of the store. But maybe SAS aren't right for your foot; do you have a pedorthist/orthotist who might know what you need?

By the way, I think you have an EXCELLENT point about the early 50's. My feet were very strong for the first half century of my life, and never had any problems whatsoever. I strongly suspect that our hormonal state in the early 50's might contribute greatly to our susceptibility to PF.

All my other tissues (skin, etc) are getting less flexible as my hormonal balances change, and this is natural. I'm not on hormone replacement therapy, though maybe I should see a doctor and ask for it; however it just seemed natural to me to let nature take its course as far as my hormone levels so I had been avoiding that.

Anyway, it would seem natural that my plantar fascia might be somewhat less flexible just like my skin, and perhaps that made me more likely to get PF because it's easier to strain things that aren't flexible.

Re: Racheal

Carmen H on 12/17/01 at 08:37 (067182)

Yes I too have found to change shoes has made a HUGE difference in the way my feet feel.

Re: Yes, this can feel good :)

John h on 12/17/01 at 16:39 (067231)

SAS stands for 'San Antonio Shoe Company'.

Re: What about us thirtysomethings? ;-)

Carmen H on 12/18/01 at 08:46 (067311)

What's our excuse if we're 30??
;-)

Re: What about us thirtysomethings? - Carmen

Julie on 12/18/01 at 09:03 (067313)

Overuse? :)

Seriously, ageing is a factor as the tissues change.

Re: Yes, this can feel good :)

Carole C on 12/15/01 at 14:29 (067057)

Sure, I read somewhere that one of the best things we can do for PF is to get new shoes, or start wearing different shoes. Each time that I have, I've felt more comfortable for a few days. My 'Florida' Birks were like a miracle until Day 5 of break-in. Last Monday I got new custom orthotics and new SAS shoes to put them in, and they are still doing really well today (Day 6).

I presently switch to my Birks for a few hours in the evenings. I think this change each day helps me to rest my feet a little. When/if I need to, I plan to get some different Birks. Maybe some of the high arch variety, in the Tatami line. Also, I want to try Arizonas sometime just because they work so well for everyone.

We have to keep trying different things and doing our best to heal our PF. My thoughts are that we should make sure that anything we put on our feet is good for them and not going to make things worse.

In my case, I don't plan to put anything on my feet that doesn't have major arch support. I don't think I can wear my Floridas all day any more, because they don't really seem to have enough arch support for me right now(although they are better than conventional shoes). Or, maybe I need new Birks that are more expertly fitted at a Birkenstock store (instead of a department store) now that I can get around well enough to get to one.

Carole C

Re: Yes, this can feel good :)

RACHAEL T. on 12/15/01 at 16:32 (067068)

Yes, thanks for your reply! My Birks are Boston clogs & I didn't think clogs would be supportive enough but they are. And, they are my rest from my tennis shoes, I guess. I hear good things on SAS - clue me in please.....Stay in touch! I had ESWT (Dornier) 3 wks. ago & my pain level has dropped ALOT! I know pf is still lurking though - but it doesn't hit me as strongly when I do feel its presence.

Re: Yes, this can feel good :)

Carole C on 12/15/01 at 17:02 (067073)

When my pedorthist made my custom orthotics last Monday, she put them in some SAS shoes that she sells, without asking me, and told me this is what I'd wear. Well, she gave me a choice of white, tan, or black, but that was it! That was probably a good thing because they are working very well for me. These particular shoes have a lot more room for the orthotic than any other shoe I've ever had, and the orthotic that she made needs a whole lot of room. I feel the shoes are huge and clunky but they are ok for my job. They are very soft, but they are also thick and I feel they provide a lot of support around my heel and the sides of the shoes (and the orthotic provides plenty for my arches). Here's a photo of me and my new SAS shoes:

http://members.home.net/louisel19/shoes.html

It's hard to get a sense of how BIG they are from the photo, though.

My previous shoes were some old worn-out SAS shoes too, which I bought years and years ago when I lived in Texas. I didn't know where to buy new ones here, or I would have. You can't buy them online, and I can't even find any photos of them online. The only way I know of to buy SAS shoes in New Orleans is to either accidently find them at a store, or to go to my pedorthist! LOL

I hope that your tennis shoes give you a lot of arch support and are a good shape, or else that you are using an orthotic in them.

I am so glad to hear about your ESWT working so well! It's encouraging to hear about it. I have not had it or any surgery, because I'm fairly new at this and trying my first orthotics at the moment, and ice, rest, stretching, and so on.

Carole C

Re: Yes, this can feel good :)

RACHAEL T. on 12/15/01 at 22:29 (067090)

Hi again Carol, Saw your 'pretty is as pretty feels' picture & actually they look like a tennis shoe in black! They aren'tclunkier looking than a Birk! Anyway, yes, I've an orthotic in my sneakers & usually wear Asics or New Balance & when at work, I wear an Ariat Boot , again with an insert......Thanks for the insight on the SAS! How long have you been in the PF world....I have been there since April, 2001! & that is quite long enough! smiling as I type that!

Re: CHANGE OF SHOES/ORTHOTIC STYLES FOR COMFORT REASONS?

nancy s. on 12/15/01 at 22:33 (067091)

rachael, after two and a half years of pf and other foot problems, and finally becoming much better, i still find what you write to be true. as an example, i had a busy day yesterday and i needed to wear three different pairs of shoes for different aspects of it:
(1) started out wearing my new balance 608s for a mile-plus walk on the beach.
(2) had to switch to my regular-footbed boston birks immediately after, because for some reason i can only walk at a good clip in athletic shoes -- can't walk really slowly or stand around in them. wore those bostons for an inaugural-train festivity and then to do some shopping.
(3) came home and my heels were sore. switched to my soft-footbed boston birks to attend a stand-around party, and they felt great and got me through the evening just fine.
i'll probably have to switch like this for the rest of my life. when pf first struck, i thought sticking inserts into my shoes first thing in the morning was a big pain in the *#%. What a spoiled brat, eh? now i have to do so much more, but am just grateful it all usually works and i no longer find any of it a pain -- as long as i can walk and don't HAVE much pain! good luck to you....
nancy

Re: Yes, this can feel good :)

Carole C on 12/15/01 at 23:00 (067093)

Hi Rachael. I am very new to PF. I never had a foot problem in my whole life of 53 years, until this fall, other than blisters and stepping on things and so on. I grew up in Hawaii and often would walk many miles barefoot with never the slightest problem, when I was young. I had healthy, strong feet then. Lots of me was healthier then than it is now! LOL Such is life.

On September 22, 2001 I got PF. It was diagnosed on November 21st along with great big ol' heelspurs on the x-ray. So for me it's not yet been even three months, and I'm already sick of it and depressed a lot. I did get to this site pretty quickly, and I got my orthotics last Monday so that was less than three months after my first symptoms. Back in September and early October my feet didn't seem that bad, but that didn't last.

Thanks for the nice words about my SAS shoes, but one of these days I'll have to photograph them with my previous SAS shoes or my Birks in the photo, so people can truly get a sense of how HUGE these are compared to what I normally wear. But they do seem to fit me very well, and to protect my foot and provide it with the support it needs. Wearing them sort of feels like wearing two army tanks. It would be really hard for me to hurt my feet any further in them! They are soft, too.

I'm glad you have good sneakers with an orthotic in them. I wasn't sure. That sounds like a good set-up. :)

Carole C

Re: Yes, this can feel good :)

Gloria U on 12/17/01 at 07:28 (067176)

I also wear orthodics in my sneakers at all times but was very interested in the SAS shoes. I have never heard of these and would probably like a pair instead of wearing sneakers all the time. Does SAS stand for andthing in particular? Do you know what kind of shoe store carries them?
I have had PF for years after I broke my ankle. Now, I have a fallen arch in my right foot and they do want to do surgery and I do not want that at all. The thought of being in a cast for 10 weeks makes me crazy. It must be the magic age of early 50's that make our feet go out of wack!!!

Gloria U

Re: SAS shoes; Early 50's and PF

Carole C on 12/17/01 at 07:56 (067179)

SAS stands for San Antonio Shoes. They are made in San Antonio, Texas. Here in New Orleans it seems very hard to find SAS shoes. I have not seen any in the stores, but that doesn't mean they aren't here. I just haven't been able to find any. I got my new pair of SAS shoes from my pedorthist, who sells this brand and a few others.

Before that, I got my previous pair of SAS shoes from a shoe store in College Station, Texas that sells a wide variety very high quality shoes as well as orthopedic shoes. If you live near there I can give you the name of the store. But maybe SAS aren't right for your foot; do you have a pedorthist/orthotist who might know what you need?

By the way, I think you have an EXCELLENT point about the early 50's. My feet were very strong for the first half century of my life, and never had any problems whatsoever. I strongly suspect that our hormonal state in the early 50's might contribute greatly to our susceptibility to PF.

All my other tissues (skin, etc) are getting less flexible as my hormonal balances change, and this is natural. I'm not on hormone replacement therapy, though maybe I should see a doctor and ask for it; however it just seemed natural to me to let nature take its course as far as my hormone levels so I had been avoiding that.

Anyway, it would seem natural that my plantar fascia might be somewhat less flexible just like my skin, and perhaps that made me more likely to get PF because it's easier to strain things that aren't flexible.

Re: Racheal

Carmen H on 12/17/01 at 08:37 (067182)

Yes I too have found to change shoes has made a HUGE difference in the way my feet feel.

Re: Yes, this can feel good :)

John h on 12/17/01 at 16:39 (067231)

SAS stands for 'San Antonio Shoe Company'.

Re: What about us thirtysomethings? ;-)

Carmen H on 12/18/01 at 08:46 (067311)

What's our excuse if we're 30??
;-)

Re: What about us thirtysomethings? - Carmen

Julie on 12/18/01 at 09:03 (067313)

Overuse? :)

Seriously, ageing is a factor as the tissues change.