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Yoga & Plantar Fasciitis

Posted by Janelle E on 12/31/01 at 12:44 (068227)

Custom orthotics since 1986 due to plantar fasciitis w/heel spurs. Use the orthotics religiously or wear Birkenstocks & Mephistos--- no real problems that a little foot rest doesn't cure --- not currently under care of podistrist.

Yoga (barefoot) since August (5 hours a week currently) ----- have recurring acute pain in arches and heel (spurs). Tried yoga with shoes ---no good --- arches actually hurt about the same as without shoes & the poses are off-balance with shoes.

Using 'FABS' for about a month but they stretch out and maybe help 20% of the time. Saw Apex Anti-shox Met/Arch Supports -- appear to be a bit more substantial than the 'FABS' but not yet tried.

Am thinking that ' taping' is a better option. The taping demo for the sole of foot does not appear to be sufficient since I will be barefooted and 'using' my feet continually.

Would greatly appreciate your advise -- and if possible more options for ' taping'.

Thanks in advance. Janelle E

Re: Yoga

alan k on 12/31/01 at 17:24 (068264)

Hi Janelle,

I was going to say hello to everyone as I am back in the US, but don't have time yet wanted to respond to your post.

I did not find fabs or similar products to help with yoga. I did find that elastic ankle wraps (like Futuro, in many drugstores) did help a little at first. I always found myself taking them off half way through the routine and feeling better after. I think they are good while warming up. What helped alot was alot of extra cushioning. A 1/8 inch thick sticky mat doesn't do it for pf-- you may need one of the more cushy, almost mattress like pads. Samadhicushions.com is where I bought mine, but there are probably much cheaper sources.

Also most important is to ABSOLUTELY avoid all strict balance poses (where balance is the main feature), and hold other standing poses for only a breath or two. You have to cut back, or you might get worse.

The trickiest thing is downward dog. There is a lot of potential in it to help greatly with pf, but at the same time it is a bit dangerous for it. And of course in many yoga classes one returns to it again and again. The trickiest part for me was moving back and up into it from another pose: the movement back strained the pf many times and slowed my healing. It has to be done carefully and by compensating with more weight on the arms while moving back-- if you are fit enough for that. The stomach and perenium (lower bandas) are extremely important when moving into downward dog if you are to avoid straining the pf.

Taping could help-- but I never did it much so don't know much about that.

take care, alan k

Re: oops

alan k on 12/31/01 at 17:25 (068266)

after I posted I noticed this was in the ask the doctors section, and I am not a doctor... sorry.

Re: Alan K!!!

wendyn on 12/31/01 at 22:46 (068294)

Are you back!?

I have missed you my favourite Buddhist!

Did I spell that right?

Wow - it's like a big family reunion today!

Re: Yoga

alan k on 12/31/01 at 17:24 (068264)

Hi Janelle,

I was going to say hello to everyone as I am back in the US, but don't have time yet wanted to respond to your post.

I did not find fabs or similar products to help with yoga. I did find that elastic ankle wraps (like Futuro, in many drugstores) did help a little at first. I always found myself taking them off half way through the routine and feeling better after. I think they are good while warming up. What helped alot was alot of extra cushioning. A 1/8 inch thick sticky mat doesn't do it for pf-- you may need one of the more cushy, almost mattress like pads. Samadhicushions.com is where I bought mine, but there are probably much cheaper sources.

Also most important is to ABSOLUTELY avoid all strict balance poses (where balance is the main feature), and hold other standing poses for only a breath or two. You have to cut back, or you might get worse.

The trickiest thing is downward dog. There is a lot of potential in it to help greatly with pf, but at the same time it is a bit dangerous for it. And of course in many yoga classes one returns to it again and again. The trickiest part for me was moving back and up into it from another pose: the movement back strained the pf many times and slowed my healing. It has to be done carefully and by compensating with more weight on the arms while moving back-- if you are fit enough for that. The stomach and perenium (lower bandas) are extremely important when moving into downward dog if you are to avoid straining the pf.

Taping could help-- but I never did it much so don't know much about that.

take care, alan k

Re: oops

alan k on 12/31/01 at 17:25 (068266)

after I posted I noticed this was in the ask the doctors section, and I am not a doctor... sorry.

Re: Alan K!!!

wendyn on 12/31/01 at 22:46 (068294)

Are you back!?

I have missed you my favourite Buddhist!

Did I spell that right?

Wow - it's like a big family reunion today!