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methylcobalamin for nerve pain/damage

Posted by alan k on 1/06/02 at 11:37 (068950)

Those with suspected nerve damage/impingement might try supplementing with methylcobalamin, which has at high doses been shown to repair nerve damage to some extent (contrary to the popular folk wisdom that neurons cannot be repaired). I would especially recommend it if you are a rat, since the study proves it works on rats.

For others, it may be an aid, like B-6, for conditions like TTS and CTS. (Of course B-6 is dangerous if supplemented too long or too much)

Methylcobalamin is a form of B-12, the only form of B-12 found in nerve tissue and brain cells. The liver converts ordinary B-12 into methylcobalamin, but only a very small portion of the various forms of '*'-cobalamin gets converted into brain and nerve B-12.

In the US methylcobalamin is a vitamin supplement, in some countries it is a prescription drug.

I can't recommend a brand as the one I bought online, a sublingual which is good, turned out to have partially hydrogenated vegetable oil as an ingredient, I guess to hold the tablet together. Such stuff, like MSG and Aspartame or nutrasweet, is a neurological toxin, although some say it does not pass the brain-blood barrier. You can imagine who says that. I suppose the amount in the sublingual is small, though.

cheers, alan

Re: methylcobalamin for nerve pain/damage

cindyp on 1/06/02 at 19:49 (068997)

I tried it and it did jack doodle.

Re: methylcobalamin for nerve pain/damage

wendyn on 1/06/02 at 22:24 (069014)

Alan - my own experience with B12 has been very good - despite the fact that I am not a rat.

I have also read very positive things about it and methylcobalamin specifically on the neuropathy website.

Re: methylcobalamin for nerve pain/damage

alan k on 1/07/02 at 07:08 (069031)

The doses they give to rats are huge, but that does not mean humans need the same dose per body weight, as the metabolism is different.

Like with B-6 and regular B-12, supplementing methylcobalamin may not help much if you have excellent intestinal health and liver health, and eat a varied diet: you might be getting enough already.

However, there still might be benefits to increasing the availability of methylcobalamin beyond maintenence levels to aid the nerve tissue in repairing damage in the long run. Few people maintain supplementation at therapeutic dose levels long enough to be sure about results. You should see my medicine cabinet-- somebody made a pile of money over the years!

alan k

Re: methylcobalamin for nerve pain/damage

Donna D on 1/07/02 at 13:57 (069077)

I also ordered the B-12 sublingual & it hasnt done squat.
THe injections help (BUT) god forbid medicare or my ins will pay for them

Re: B-12 is not methylcobalamin

alan k on 1/08/02 at 12:29 (069209)

I still think methylcobalamin is worth looking into. Ordinary B-12, sublingual or not, is not methylcobalamin, so experiences with B-12 are not relevant. See my first post for explanation of the difference.

Re: I thought it's an Air Force bomber :-)

elliott on 1/08/02 at 14:55 (069228)

Alan, you clearly know a lot and I appreciate the time you're taking to type out all these posts. Now I probably have a more technical bent than most here; I therefore doubt I'm the only one who finds your posts a bit too technical and myself too impatient to read through them carefully. But I'm probably the only one among this mostly female, emotional, loving and caring group that will tell you so. :-) Reading some of your posts, I just wish I could simply know which drugs are worth trying for which symptoms (I never heard of some of these drugs and really want to know!). Your med descriptions seem to come complete with chemical compounds and all and sound like they're out of a journal. I mean, to put things in perspective, if someone with nervy problems in the foot came on the board and asked where the tarsal tunnel is, there could give two types of answers:

1. 'The tarsal tunnel is a fibro-osseus tunnel. Its floor is formed by the talus and calcaneus bones and the tibialis posterior, flexor digitorum longus, and the flexor hallucis longus, and its roof is formed by the flexor retinaculum. At the distal end, the tunnel blends into the superficial and deep fascia of the abductor hallucis muscle. The tibial nerve travels inferior to the medial malleolus, anterior to the Achilles tendon, and...'

2. just behind and below the inner ankle

I cropped no. 1 from a journal article, but no. 2 might be a little more useful for most here. So, what I'm saying is, I don't want to take away your thunder, but it might help to dumb down the answers a bit ('You have tingling? Try this, or even this! Didn't work? You can still try that!') and save the technicals for those who ask. If you enjoy to continue posting as you have, no harm, fine. But this might save you a lot of time, as well as help some of us figure out if there are any meds that might help our situation. Thanks!!!

---

Re: thanks elliot: It was the smart drugs talking

alan k on 1/08/02 at 17:55 (069247)

I thought I was a bit brash with you before but glad to see you have no problem. I checked out your recent posts and discovered that you have a lively sense of humor, so you were not completely serious about the conspiracy theories. People here love people like you who use humor. I used to be funny, but now my smart drugs have taken over. I will try to lower the dose and see if they still help the pain at the lower doses.

About the technical posts, I am afraid I am suffering from a psychological problem called acute procrastination. Every morning I expend my best writing time on lengthy posts. Sorry. I hope at least that this will match up with other procrastinators who use lengthy reading as a crutch.

I believe I did suggest two medications that help me with nerve pain (due to compression of nerve clusters in the neck, I'm no longer plagued by tts or pf), but you have to do a web search or visit ceri.com if you want more info on them in particular, though I will answer all questions. Those were Hydergine (that is in fact the brand name) and Piracetam (the brand name is Nootropil).

On the other hand, I was not very specific about either 1) supplements for nerve and brain function, or 2) earlier posts about available substitutes for the Thai medicine I took last year (this latter is a completely separate issue, and did help with tts and pf). I will post on both soon, hopefully in a more concise manner.

Also I do not want to confuse these two treatments, since the nerve and brain medications and supplements may only help with the symptom of pain, while the Thai medicines were curative.

thanks for the suggestion,,, alan k

Re: LOL!

elliott on 1/08/02 at 18:06 (069249)

You said, 'People here love people like you who use humor.' Now THAT honestly made me laugh! Pretty funny! HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!!!!!!

----

Re: thanks elliot: It was the smart drugs talking

Donna D on 1/08/02 at 18:23 (069255)

Alan I keep getting all the mail you are sending to Elliott.dont have the first idea what you are discussing,thought you would like to know.
I have just found this site & am not familer with all
I am usually on the John Hopkins chat site

Re: LOL!

wendyn on 1/08/02 at 19:44 (069265)

A big (((HUG)))

Just for YOU Elliott.

Re: methylcobalamin for nerve pain/damage

cindyp on 1/06/02 at 19:49 (068997)

I tried it and it did jack doodle.

Re: methylcobalamin for nerve pain/damage

wendyn on 1/06/02 at 22:24 (069014)

Alan - my own experience with B12 has been very good - despite the fact that I am not a rat.

I have also read very positive things about it and methylcobalamin specifically on the neuropathy website.

Re: methylcobalamin for nerve pain/damage

alan k on 1/07/02 at 07:08 (069031)

The doses they give to rats are huge, but that does not mean humans need the same dose per body weight, as the metabolism is different.

Like with B-6 and regular B-12, supplementing methylcobalamin may not help much if you have excellent intestinal health and liver health, and eat a varied diet: you might be getting enough already.

However, there still might be benefits to increasing the availability of methylcobalamin beyond maintenence levels to aid the nerve tissue in repairing damage in the long run. Few people maintain supplementation at therapeutic dose levels long enough to be sure about results. You should see my medicine cabinet-- somebody made a pile of money over the years!

alan k

Re: methylcobalamin for nerve pain/damage

Donna D on 1/07/02 at 13:57 (069077)

I also ordered the B-12 sublingual & it hasnt done squat.
THe injections help (BUT) god forbid medicare or my ins will pay for them

Re: B-12 is not methylcobalamin

alan k on 1/08/02 at 12:29 (069209)

I still think methylcobalamin is worth looking into. Ordinary B-12, sublingual or not, is not methylcobalamin, so experiences with B-12 are not relevant. See my first post for explanation of the difference.

Re: I thought it's an Air Force bomber :-)

elliott on 1/08/02 at 14:55 (069228)

Alan, you clearly know a lot and I appreciate the time you're taking to type out all these posts. Now I probably have a more technical bent than most here; I therefore doubt I'm the only one who finds your posts a bit too technical and myself too impatient to read through them carefully. But I'm probably the only one among this mostly female, emotional, loving and caring group that will tell you so. :-) Reading some of your posts, I just wish I could simply know which drugs are worth trying for which symptoms (I never heard of some of these drugs and really want to know!). Your med descriptions seem to come complete with chemical compounds and all and sound like they're out of a journal. I mean, to put things in perspective, if someone with nervy problems in the foot came on the board and asked where the tarsal tunnel is, there could give two types of answers:

1. 'The tarsal tunnel is a fibro-osseus tunnel. Its floor is formed by the talus and calcaneus bones and the tibialis posterior, flexor digitorum longus, and the flexor hallucis longus, and its roof is formed by the flexor retinaculum. At the distal end, the tunnel blends into the superficial and deep fascia of the abductor hallucis muscle. The tibial nerve travels inferior to the medial malleolus, anterior to the Achilles tendon, and...'

2. just behind and below the inner ankle

I cropped no. 1 from a journal article, but no. 2 might be a little more useful for most here. So, what I'm saying is, I don't want to take away your thunder, but it might help to dumb down the answers a bit ('You have tingling? Try this, or even this! Didn't work? You can still try that!') and save the technicals for those who ask. If you enjoy to continue posting as you have, no harm, fine. But this might save you a lot of time, as well as help some of us figure out if there are any meds that might help our situation. Thanks!!!

---

Re: thanks elliot: It was the smart drugs talking

alan k on 1/08/02 at 17:55 (069247)

I thought I was a bit brash with you before but glad to see you have no problem. I checked out your recent posts and discovered that you have a lively sense of humor, so you were not completely serious about the conspiracy theories. People here love people like you who use humor. I used to be funny, but now my smart drugs have taken over. I will try to lower the dose and see if they still help the pain at the lower doses.

About the technical posts, I am afraid I am suffering from a psychological problem called acute procrastination. Every morning I expend my best writing time on lengthy posts. Sorry. I hope at least that this will match up with other procrastinators who use lengthy reading as a crutch.

I believe I did suggest two medications that help me with nerve pain (due to compression of nerve clusters in the neck, I'm no longer plagued by tts or pf), but you have to do a web search or visit ceri.com if you want more info on them in particular, though I will answer all questions. Those were Hydergine (that is in fact the brand name) and Piracetam (the brand name is Nootropil).

On the other hand, I was not very specific about either 1) supplements for nerve and brain function, or 2) earlier posts about available substitutes for the Thai medicine I took last year (this latter is a completely separate issue, and did help with tts and pf). I will post on both soon, hopefully in a more concise manner.

Also I do not want to confuse these two treatments, since the nerve and brain medications and supplements may only help with the symptom of pain, while the Thai medicines were curative.

thanks for the suggestion,,, alan k

Re: LOL!

elliott on 1/08/02 at 18:06 (069249)

You said, 'People here love people like you who use humor.' Now THAT honestly made me laugh! Pretty funny! HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!!!!!!

----

Re: thanks elliot: It was the smart drugs talking

Donna D on 1/08/02 at 18:23 (069255)

Alan I keep getting all the mail you are sending to Elliott.dont have the first idea what you are discussing,thought you would like to know.
I have just found this site & am not familer with all
I am usually on the John Hopkins chat site

Re: LOL!

wendyn on 1/08/02 at 19:44 (069265)

A big (((HUG)))

Just for YOU Elliott.