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TTS returning

Posted by Pat B on 1/11/02 at 16:57 (069670)

I have had TTS surgery in July. I thought I was about 60% better after the surgery. I still had some pain but it was tolerable. Now it is 6 months later and my pain that has gone is coming back. I am getting cramps in my feet and now legs, my toe pain is back, the middle of my feet are hurting, it hurts to drive again and I get awaken at night by cramps. My doctor told me he has never had an unsuccessful TTS surgery yet. The sad part of all this is that my other foot is continually getting worse as well which has never been treated yet. This one is much more slow progressing but is about 50% of the way compared to the other. I am thinking of many options here. I thought of asking for another nerve testing to be done to do a comparison of the presurgical and present condition to see truly how successful the surgery really was. I am also thinking of going for a second opinion but I question on who should I really see for this condition. Who has the most success as far as specialists--podiatrists, neurologists, sports medicine, any other thoughts.

I am wondering if anyone out there has there legs and knees bother them from TTS. My knees are getting weird too and making noises and my legs are sore especially below my knees but sometimes above (I am only 39 years old but am feeling 100!!!).

Are there any common mistakes as far as diagnosis for TTS. Could I possibly have something other than TTS? Any thoughts.

Thanks all for your input.

Re: please look at her post

alan k on 1/12/02 at 08:30 (069729)

I think we should put our noggins together here. And do ask this question on the doctors board, with a heading like 'tts surgery not working.,' or something. Perhaps someone here has had similar experiences and can lend a hand?

Also, you should see another doctor for a second opinion, perhaps a neurologist. I am not sure if the nerve conduction tests can tell you anything definitive about whether you are getting worse or better.

You can gain relaxation of muscles and reduce nightcramps by supplementing with magnesium, malic acid, and Vitamin E (get a 'mixed-tocopherols' formula).

alan k

Re: To Pat

wendyn on 1/12/02 at 10:59 (069737)

Pat, I am very sorry about your pain - it sounds awful.

My wrists are sore - so I will try to be brief, please don't interpret it as being 'curt'.

If you're doctor claims a past 100% sucess rate with TTS surgery, he either hasn't done very many, hasn't followed them up, or he's fibbing. Or he's a miracle worker. The success rates for TTS seem to be in the range of 40 to 75% - success being more likely when there is an identifiable mass in the tunnel.

There are MANY different diagnosis that could be confused/combined with symptoms like TTS - and not to scare you but to show you that you need to investigate I'll list a few......(this based on experience here, and what I've read).

low thyroid
low b12
diabetes
fibromyalgia
ankalosing spondylitis (sp?)
rheumatoid arthritis
MS
RSD
other forms of neuropathy

Anyway - you get the point. A second opinion should always be pursued BEFORE surgey (in my opinion) - and definately if there is a surgical outcome that isn't what you expected.

You may want to start by going back to your primary doctor or GP and taking ALL of your records with you. Explain all your symptoms and hopefully you'll receive a referral to an orthepedic surgeon and or neurologist. Since you don't say who your current doctor is - I'm guessing that it's a podiatrist. I'd be less likely to consult podiatrist in this case because you are having pain in other parts of your body rather than just your feet.

Other than the nerve conduction test - what type of tests were done before your surgery?

How long had you had problems - what types of treatments were tried?

What did your doctor find during the surgery?

Re: please look at her post

alan k on 1/12/02 at 08:30 (069729)

I think we should put our noggins together here. And do ask this question on the doctors board, with a heading like 'tts surgery not working.,' or something. Perhaps someone here has had similar experiences and can lend a hand?

Also, you should see another doctor for a second opinion, perhaps a neurologist. I am not sure if the nerve conduction tests can tell you anything definitive about whether you are getting worse or better.

You can gain relaxation of muscles and reduce nightcramps by supplementing with magnesium, malic acid, and Vitamin E (get a 'mixed-tocopherols' formula).

alan k

Re: To Pat

wendyn on 1/12/02 at 10:59 (069737)

Pat, I am very sorry about your pain - it sounds awful.

My wrists are sore - so I will try to be brief, please don't interpret it as being 'curt'.

If you're doctor claims a past 100% sucess rate with TTS surgery, he either hasn't done very many, hasn't followed them up, or he's fibbing. Or he's a miracle worker. The success rates for TTS seem to be in the range of 40 to 75% - success being more likely when there is an identifiable mass in the tunnel.

There are MANY different diagnosis that could be confused/combined with symptoms like TTS - and not to scare you but to show you that you need to investigate I'll list a few......(this based on experience here, and what I've read).

low thyroid
low b12
diabetes
fibromyalgia
ankalosing spondylitis (sp?)
rheumatoid arthritis
MS
RSD
other forms of neuropathy

Anyway - you get the point. A second opinion should always be pursued BEFORE surgey (in my opinion) - and definately if there is a surgical outcome that isn't what you expected.

You may want to start by going back to your primary doctor or GP and taking ALL of your records with you. Explain all your symptoms and hopefully you'll receive a referral to an orthepedic surgeon and or neurologist. Since you don't say who your current doctor is - I'm guessing that it's a podiatrist. I'd be less likely to consult podiatrist in this case because you are having pain in other parts of your body rather than just your feet.

Other than the nerve conduction test - what type of tests were done before your surgery?

How long had you had problems - what types of treatments were tried?

What did your doctor find during the surgery?