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Necee's Birthday

Posted by Maureen S on 1/18/02 at 10:59 (070381)

I want to wish Necee a Happy Birthday today --early--before she leaves to the ranch.
Have a Happy Birthday on Sunday!!!!!!!
Hugs too!
Maureen

Re: Necee's Birthday

JudyS on 1/18/02 at 11:08 (070385)

Ditto that, Necee!

Re: Necee's Birthday

Suzanne D on 1/18/02 at 11:35 (070388)

HAPPY EARLY BIRTHDAY to you, Necee! You would like our tree today: it snowed last night - the pretty kind that didn't really stick to the roads (so we have school) - but covers every branch. We read STRANGER IN THE WOODS which you would love. It has gorgeous photos on each page of all kinds of creatures - cardinals, blue jays, owls, deer, etc. finding a snowman in the woods filled with treats for the animals. I have been saving it for such a day as today.

Have a special birthday!

Re: Necee's Birthday

Tammie on 1/18/02 at 11:41 (070389)

Necee, I hope that your Birthday is as wonderful and as special as you are!!!! Happy Birthday to u Happy birthday to u Happy birthday Dear Necee Happy birthday to u And many many moreeeeeeee! May all of your Birthday wishes come true! Hugs to you my dear friend!

Re: Necee's Birthday

Carmen on 1/18/02 at 14:48 (070417)

HAPPY HAPPY HAPPY birthday to you!!!!
I am also an aquarius. Feisty little buggers aren't we??
;-)
have a wonderful day!

Re: Necee's Birthday

Beverly on 1/18/02 at 15:21 (070422)

Happy Birthday. Have a great day!
Beverly

Re: Necee's Birthday

Carole C on 1/18/02 at 18:36 (070443)

Happy, happy birthday, Necee!!

Carole C

Re: Necee's Birthday

Janet C. on 1/18/02 at 18:56 (070449)

Dearest Necee,

I hope you have a WONDERFUL Birthday, my dear friend!!!

With Love Always ~ Janet

Re: Necee's Birthday

Necee on 1/18/02 at 21:49 (070459)

How sweet!!! Ya'll just made my day!!! I appreciate the birthday wishes more than you'll ever know!!
It's going to be a busy weekend for me.....I'm working 2 auctions on Saturday, so thats going to be a very long and hard day. But Sunday I will rest!! And just enjoy my day!!
Thank you all for making it extra special!!
Happy Trails.....
Necee

Re: Necee's Birthday

Laurie R on 1/19/02 at 11:16 (070504)

HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO YOU Necee..... I hope tomarrow you get to do something special for your special day ..... I hope you got the card I sent you .. Much love , Laurie R

Re: Necee's Birthday

Anthony P on 1/19/02 at 21:59 (070598)

HAVE A HAPPY BIRTHDAY NECEE :) Anthony P

Re: Necee's Birthday

john h on 1/22/02 at 10:58 (070872)

I have no idea nor will I ask how old you are Neecee but the famous old black baseball pitcher who no one ever knew how old he was had a question: 'How old would you be if you did not know how old your were?'

Re: Necee's Birthday

Julie on 1/23/02 at 05:05 (070947)

John, I know how old I'd be. 27, the age at which I got married, and which my husband insisted I was for at leat the next 20 years. (He's gone up to 37 now, bless him.)

How about you? How about everyone?

Re: Necee's Birthday

john h on 1/23/02 at 11:37 (070990)

I think I would be 30 Julie. At 25 I was still lost in the wilderness. I envy you and your biking through Europe when you were young. What fun that must have been. In all my travels when young I passed up seeing many things except the obvious. I hung around Paris when I wished I had gone into the countryside on a bike trip. I waa in England many times but did not venture out into the countryside. I would dearly like to go back to Vietnam and Laos and visit some of the villages and really see the people and land. I was there but did not see.

Re: Necee's Birthday

JudyS on 1/23/02 at 17:05 (071021)

It's never too late, John h.

Re: Necee's Birthday

Julie on 1/24/02 at 03:35 (071084)

It was fun, John - even in the rain.

I think it's lovely that you'd like to return to Vietnam and Laos - and I hope you will. Judy is right: it's never too late. I didn't start realizing my dream of travelling in India until I was 61 and now I've been four times in the last five years. So go for it.

Re: Necee's Birthday

john h on 1/24/02 at 10:53 (071120)

Judy & Julie: some author said 'you can never go back' or was it 'you can never go back home'?

Re: Necee's Birthday

John h on 1/24/02 at 18:37 (071168)

talking about your biking julie reminded me that for the two years i was in vietnam/laos i rode a bike the entire time. I really enjoyed that bike and brought it home with me only to find all the traffic and people who would see how close they could come to me without hitting me.

Re: Necee's Birthday

nancy s. on 1/24/02 at 19:38 (071173)

i think it's thomas wolfe, 'you can't go home again.'
i had the book for many years on my shelf but never read it. i guess i didn't want to read a whole book about not going home again.

Re: Necee's Birthday

Julie on 1/25/02 at 02:49 (071199)

Yes, it was Thomas Wolfe. Nancy, you're too old for that book now: it's definitely for adolescents. Did you ever read his poetry -'A Stone, A Leaf, A Door?' I was in love with it when I was 14, came across a copy 20 years later and cringed.

John, cut the excuses. You CAN go to Vietnam if you really want to. Remember, it's 25(?) years since you were there, and it's a different place now, so think of it as going forward, not back.

Re: Necee's Birthday

Julie on 1/25/02 at 02:53 (071201)

Snap, John. I rode my bike to work (9 miles through London traffic) for years, until the traffic - and even more, the unmended potholes - finally defeated me. I put the bike away about 15 years ago. It mouldered in the garage for 14 years, and last year I gave it to a carpenter who noticed and admired it while making a gate for us. He rehabilitated it and gave it to his son, who is presumably now challenging traffic. Good luck to him. I still miss it - though not the traffic.

Re: A Stone, A Leaf, A Door

nancy s. on 1/25/02 at 03:41 (071203)

hi julie, in reading your post i fell instantly in love with the title 'a stone, a leaf, a door' and thought 'i'll have to read that' -- till i saw you were in love with it at 14 and cringed later. guess i'll skip it! i think the only poet i loved that i don't cringe about now is rilke. and it's my own poetry at 14 that makes me cringe most of all; yuck.

john, phil is leaving sometime in february for a monthlong wandering. he can't decide whether it will be to vietnam, cambodia, tanzania, or ethiopia. usually he settles on someplace in asia, so if it's vietnam, maybe you should go with him. he could use the company, since i travel only vicariously -- through him. of course you'd have to stay in buggy old hotels or huts and eat strange things, because he will travel only in local circles as much as possible. but that shouldn't be hard for an old warhorse like yourself who has been through much worse, eh?
nancy

Re: A Stone, A Leaf, A Door

Julie on 1/25/02 at 06:50 (071208)

Nancy, I remember the first line: 'A stone, a leaf, an unfound door, of a stone, a leaf, a door'.

Make sense of that if you can.

I love Rilke too.

John and Nancy - I've just heard a snatch on the radio of Anthony Bourdain, the New York chef, reading from his new book 'In Search of the Perfect Meal' (or some such title). He has apparently been all over the world eating whatever there is to eat there. On this programme he was describing eating cobra hearts and other interesting tidbits in Saigon. Cobra hearts aside, he seems to love Saigon.

He says London is the most exciting place on the planet to eat these days.

Re: Necee's Birthday

john h on 1/25/02 at 09:56 (071233)

Actually Julie a couple of my military friends returned many years ago and sponsor an orphanage to which many of us donate money. Some of the places I would like to go can only be reached by helicopter. Before it was destroyed Saigon was known as the Paris of the Far East and in fact it would remind you of Paris. The people still like and welcome Americans and I think we have made peace with the North Vietnamese. Most of us who served there no longer have any ill will towards the North Vietnamese and I would have no problem having a glass of wine and visiting with my former adversaries. All of us were just trying to survive.

Re: A Stone, A Leaf, A Door

john h on 1/25/02 at 10:05 (071235)

Vietnam and Cambodia sure sound better than the others to me. Phil you lucky duck! A month of wondering in the far east! wow! Lots of my former military friends have returned to Vietnam and sent me pictures of my old haunts many of which of been returned to the jungle from which they sprung. Even after 30 years the people outside the cities live the same as they did for the past 100 years. Growing rice and tending their water buffalo. Never in a hurry, always friendly. Laos is one of the more remote regions of the world. Almost solid jungle with mountains of karst rising up out of the tripple canopy jungle cover. You can fly for hundreds of miles and see no one or anything.

Re: A Stone, A Leaf, A Door

john h on 1/25/02 at 10:13 (071236)

I do not want to hurt Julie's feelings but I never found London the most exciting place to eat. Maybe it was that warm beer. Maybe things have changed. The French did know how to serve and prepare food in style. I have eaten rattle snake but only because I was forced to. taste sort of like chicken. saw lots of cobra and want no part of them. After being in Vietnam for a year on my first tour the first thing I wanted to eat when I returned to the states was a 'cheeseburger'! I was thinking as I got off the plane near Los Angeles that I was headed to the nearest burger joint and that is just what I did. You would think I would want a filet or something exotic but did the cheeseburger taste good. Absolutely every meal in Vietnam included rice. I actually got to like the way they prepared rice and eggs in the morning. Have never been able to duplicate it.

Re: A Stone, A Leaf, A Door

nancy s. on 1/25/02 at 10:29 (071239)

i tried to make sense of that line and failed. i don't think it's because i'm tired, either!

four years ago phil went to hong kong, burma, thailand, and laos. he loved laos. he actually found some people there, in tiny villages. one village was known for the women's great weaving abilities.

since he and i are always fighting over the bed blankets, he asked the women in this laotian village to make him a big quilt -- really big, because he's 6'3' and we have a kingsize bed. when he told them how big he wanted it, they howled. they had never seen anyone who wanted such a big quilt and thought it was hysterical. they had to move their whole operation to someone's giant porch, and the whole village came to watch them work. they all howled too. phil took pictures of the workers' friendly laughing faces. at one point they let him help, someone took his picture with our camera, and he was laughing along with the rest of them.

big as it is, we still argue over who has the most of this quilt on which side of the bed! so i give up.

my guess is that he'll go either to vietnam or to cambodia. cambodia may win out on this trip, because last year my brother and his wife adopted a one-year-old from a cambodian orphanage. she's adorable.

john, i'd think it would be a terrific experience to go share a table with former adversaries.
nancy

Re: A Stone, A Leaf, A Door

paula on 1/25/02 at 10:51 (071243)

ohmygod someone is talking literature here? i think wolfe is a pretty good novelist. i liked 'look homeward angel'. to get him to write his next book maxwell perkins locked him in a barn and tossed bottles of liquor to him periodically. wolfe was a big influence on kerouac who's 'on the road' and 'dharma bums' played a major role in creating the hippies, the gay and women's liberation movements, the anti vietnam war movement. and the hippies helped popularize birkenstocks so who knows, maybe we have a lot to thank wolfe for. i would recommend 'angel' as wolf's best.

Re: London food

Julie on 1/25/02 at 11:06 (071245)

John, there's no way you could hurt my feelings whatever you said, but I've got to break it to you that you're awfully out of date. Yes, food did not used to be one of London's attractions, but EVERYTHING has changed in the last 10-15 years. Anthony Bourdain compared it to Australia with regard to the blossoming of excellent restaurants of all kinds at all levels.

And if cold beer is what you want, it's available. Lots of folk here think it kills the taste - but I wouldn't expect you to agree. (I know you all have ice-machines in your refrigerators.)

You can buy a larger range of wine in England than you can in France (and probably anywhere else in the world, for all I know). A couple of years ago I asked a French sales guy in my favourite wine store what a French wine seller was doing in London, and he replied that if you work in wine, England is a much better place to work than France: the range is much more varied and interesting.

You'll just have to update your experience one of these days.

Re: A Stone, A Leaf, A Door

nancy s. on 1/25/02 at 15:33 (071283)

for about a decade years ago everyone in my family would write up a book review of each book we read and circulate it via the u.s. mail.

kerouac's 'on the road' was the favorite book of both of my brothers at the time. my mother, wanting to see what the fuss was about, read 'on the road' and sent around her critique.

it began: 'this is the boring chronicle of two pathetic bums criss-crossing the country trying desperately to have fun.' she also mentioned their sexless sex lives.

my older brother put a grade on my mother's book report -- it was a D-minus -- with the command, 'mary jane, please see me after class.'

Re: Necee's Birthday

John h on 1/25/02 at 18:49 (071306)

Hey Julie: how do I go about this? just say Mary I am out of here and headed to the far east. see you in a couple of months. try the cell phone if you need me.

Re: A Stone, A Leaf, A Door

paula on 1/25/02 at 18:52 (071308)

its amazing how 'on the road' keeps grabbing young readers. a schoolteacher friend told me that two teenage students endlessly work on and try to revive an old car for that very criss crossing road trip that mystifies the old and invites the young.

Re: Looking East

Julie on 1/26/02 at 02:48 (071352)

Well, you could ask her to go with you. If she really doesn't want to travel that far, you could ask her how she'd feel if you went on your own for a couple of weeks. Either way she might surprise you. She might even like some time by herself. It's hard to say, everyone's relationship is different, but I travel a lot on my own and it doesn't seem to bother Klaus (who isn't as keen on going places as I am). In fact whenever I come home and ask him if he's missed me, he always tells me how well he slept while I was away.

Oh - I said 'a couple of weeks', but with my recent experience fresh in my mind I'd actually suggest at least three, to give you time to get over whatever bug you might possibly catch from the recycled air on the plane. (Unless, of course, you fly yourself over.)

Watch out for cobras.

Re: Necee's Birthday

JudyS on 1/18/02 at 11:08 (070385)

Ditto that, Necee!

Re: Necee's Birthday

Suzanne D on 1/18/02 at 11:35 (070388)

HAPPY EARLY BIRTHDAY to you, Necee! You would like our tree today: it snowed last night - the pretty kind that didn't really stick to the roads (so we have school) - but covers every branch. We read STRANGER IN THE WOODS which you would love. It has gorgeous photos on each page of all kinds of creatures - cardinals, blue jays, owls, deer, etc. finding a snowman in the woods filled with treats for the animals. I have been saving it for such a day as today.

Have a special birthday!

Re: Necee's Birthday

Tammie on 1/18/02 at 11:41 (070389)

Necee, I hope that your Birthday is as wonderful and as special as you are!!!! Happy Birthday to u Happy birthday to u Happy birthday Dear Necee Happy birthday to u And many many moreeeeeeee! May all of your Birthday wishes come true! Hugs to you my dear friend!

Re: Necee's Birthday

Carmen on 1/18/02 at 14:48 (070417)

HAPPY HAPPY HAPPY birthday to you!!!!
I am also an aquarius. Feisty little buggers aren't we??
;-)
have a wonderful day!

Re: Necee's Birthday

Beverly on 1/18/02 at 15:21 (070422)

Happy Birthday. Have a great day!
Beverly

Re: Necee's Birthday

Carole C on 1/18/02 at 18:36 (070443)

Happy, happy birthday, Necee!!

Carole C

Re: Necee's Birthday

Janet C. on 1/18/02 at 18:56 (070449)

Dearest Necee,

I hope you have a WONDERFUL Birthday, my dear friend!!!

With Love Always ~ Janet

Re: Necee's Birthday

Necee on 1/18/02 at 21:49 (070459)

How sweet!!! Ya'll just made my day!!! I appreciate the birthday wishes more than you'll ever know!!
It's going to be a busy weekend for me.....I'm working 2 auctions on Saturday, so thats going to be a very long and hard day. But Sunday I will rest!! And just enjoy my day!!
Thank you all for making it extra special!!
Happy Trails.....
Necee

Re: Necee's Birthday

Laurie R on 1/19/02 at 11:16 (070504)

HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO YOU Necee..... I hope tomarrow you get to do something special for your special day ..... I hope you got the card I sent you .. Much love , Laurie R

Re: Necee's Birthday

Anthony P on 1/19/02 at 21:59 (070598)

HAVE A HAPPY BIRTHDAY NECEE :) Anthony P

Re: Necee's Birthday

john h on 1/22/02 at 10:58 (070872)

I have no idea nor will I ask how old you are Neecee but the famous old black baseball pitcher who no one ever knew how old he was had a question: 'How old would you be if you did not know how old your were?'

Re: Necee's Birthday

Julie on 1/23/02 at 05:05 (070947)

John, I know how old I'd be. 27, the age at which I got married, and which my husband insisted I was for at leat the next 20 years. (He's gone up to 37 now, bless him.)

How about you? How about everyone?

Re: Necee's Birthday

john h on 1/23/02 at 11:37 (070990)

I think I would be 30 Julie. At 25 I was still lost in the wilderness. I envy you and your biking through Europe when you were young. What fun that must have been. In all my travels when young I passed up seeing many things except the obvious. I hung around Paris when I wished I had gone into the countryside on a bike trip. I waa in England many times but did not venture out into the countryside. I would dearly like to go back to Vietnam and Laos and visit some of the villages and really see the people and land. I was there but did not see.

Re: Necee's Birthday

JudyS on 1/23/02 at 17:05 (071021)

It's never too late, John h.

Re: Necee's Birthday

Julie on 1/24/02 at 03:35 (071084)

It was fun, John - even in the rain.

I think it's lovely that you'd like to return to Vietnam and Laos - and I hope you will. Judy is right: it's never too late. I didn't start realizing my dream of travelling in India until I was 61 and now I've been four times in the last five years. So go for it.

Re: Necee's Birthday

john h on 1/24/02 at 10:53 (071120)

Judy & Julie: some author said 'you can never go back' or was it 'you can never go back home'?

Re: Necee's Birthday

John h on 1/24/02 at 18:37 (071168)

talking about your biking julie reminded me that for the two years i was in vietnam/laos i rode a bike the entire time. I really enjoyed that bike and brought it home with me only to find all the traffic and people who would see how close they could come to me without hitting me.

Re: Necee's Birthday

nancy s. on 1/24/02 at 19:38 (071173)

i think it's thomas wolfe, 'you can't go home again.'
i had the book for many years on my shelf but never read it. i guess i didn't want to read a whole book about not going home again.

Re: Necee's Birthday

Julie on 1/25/02 at 02:49 (071199)

Yes, it was Thomas Wolfe. Nancy, you're too old for that book now: it's definitely for adolescents. Did you ever read his poetry -'A Stone, A Leaf, A Door?' I was in love with it when I was 14, came across a copy 20 years later and cringed.

John, cut the excuses. You CAN go to Vietnam if you really want to. Remember, it's 25(?) years since you were there, and it's a different place now, so think of it as going forward, not back.

Re: Necee's Birthday

Julie on 1/25/02 at 02:53 (071201)

Snap, John. I rode my bike to work (9 miles through London traffic) for years, until the traffic - and even more, the unmended potholes - finally defeated me. I put the bike away about 15 years ago. It mouldered in the garage for 14 years, and last year I gave it to a carpenter who noticed and admired it while making a gate for us. He rehabilitated it and gave it to his son, who is presumably now challenging traffic. Good luck to him. I still miss it - though not the traffic.

Re: A Stone, A Leaf, A Door

nancy s. on 1/25/02 at 03:41 (071203)

hi julie, in reading your post i fell instantly in love with the title 'a stone, a leaf, a door' and thought 'i'll have to read that' -- till i saw you were in love with it at 14 and cringed later. guess i'll skip it! i think the only poet i loved that i don't cringe about now is rilke. and it's my own poetry at 14 that makes me cringe most of all; yuck.

john, phil is leaving sometime in february for a monthlong wandering. he can't decide whether it will be to vietnam, cambodia, tanzania, or ethiopia. usually he settles on someplace in asia, so if it's vietnam, maybe you should go with him. he could use the company, since i travel only vicariously -- through him. of course you'd have to stay in buggy old hotels or huts and eat strange things, because he will travel only in local circles as much as possible. but that shouldn't be hard for an old warhorse like yourself who has been through much worse, eh?
nancy

Re: A Stone, A Leaf, A Door

Julie on 1/25/02 at 06:50 (071208)

Nancy, I remember the first line: 'A stone, a leaf, an unfound door, of a stone, a leaf, a door'.

Make sense of that if you can.

I love Rilke too.

John and Nancy - I've just heard a snatch on the radio of Anthony Bourdain, the New York chef, reading from his new book 'In Search of the Perfect Meal' (or some such title). He has apparently been all over the world eating whatever there is to eat there. On this programme he was describing eating cobra hearts and other interesting tidbits in Saigon. Cobra hearts aside, he seems to love Saigon.

He says London is the most exciting place on the planet to eat these days.

Re: Necee's Birthday

john h on 1/25/02 at 09:56 (071233)

Actually Julie a couple of my military friends returned many years ago and sponsor an orphanage to which many of us donate money. Some of the places I would like to go can only be reached by helicopter. Before it was destroyed Saigon was known as the Paris of the Far East and in fact it would remind you of Paris. The people still like and welcome Americans and I think we have made peace with the North Vietnamese. Most of us who served there no longer have any ill will towards the North Vietnamese and I would have no problem having a glass of wine and visiting with my former adversaries. All of us were just trying to survive.

Re: A Stone, A Leaf, A Door

john h on 1/25/02 at 10:05 (071235)

Vietnam and Cambodia sure sound better than the others to me. Phil you lucky duck! A month of wondering in the far east! wow! Lots of my former military friends have returned to Vietnam and sent me pictures of my old haunts many of which of been returned to the jungle from which they sprung. Even after 30 years the people outside the cities live the same as they did for the past 100 years. Growing rice and tending their water buffalo. Never in a hurry, always friendly. Laos is one of the more remote regions of the world. Almost solid jungle with mountains of karst rising up out of the tripple canopy jungle cover. You can fly for hundreds of miles and see no one or anything.

Re: A Stone, A Leaf, A Door

john h on 1/25/02 at 10:13 (071236)

I do not want to hurt Julie's feelings but I never found London the most exciting place to eat. Maybe it was that warm beer. Maybe things have changed. The French did know how to serve and prepare food in style. I have eaten rattle snake but only because I was forced to. taste sort of like chicken. saw lots of cobra and want no part of them. After being in Vietnam for a year on my first tour the first thing I wanted to eat when I returned to the states was a 'cheeseburger'! I was thinking as I got off the plane near Los Angeles that I was headed to the nearest burger joint and that is just what I did. You would think I would want a filet or something exotic but did the cheeseburger taste good. Absolutely every meal in Vietnam included rice. I actually got to like the way they prepared rice and eggs in the morning. Have never been able to duplicate it.

Re: A Stone, A Leaf, A Door

nancy s. on 1/25/02 at 10:29 (071239)

i tried to make sense of that line and failed. i don't think it's because i'm tired, either!

four years ago phil went to hong kong, burma, thailand, and laos. he loved laos. he actually found some people there, in tiny villages. one village was known for the women's great weaving abilities.

since he and i are always fighting over the bed blankets, he asked the women in this laotian village to make him a big quilt -- really big, because he's 6'3' and we have a kingsize bed. when he told them how big he wanted it, they howled. they had never seen anyone who wanted such a big quilt and thought it was hysterical. they had to move their whole operation to someone's giant porch, and the whole village came to watch them work. they all howled too. phil took pictures of the workers' friendly laughing faces. at one point they let him help, someone took his picture with our camera, and he was laughing along with the rest of them.

big as it is, we still argue over who has the most of this quilt on which side of the bed! so i give up.

my guess is that he'll go either to vietnam or to cambodia. cambodia may win out on this trip, because last year my brother and his wife adopted a one-year-old from a cambodian orphanage. she's adorable.

john, i'd think it would be a terrific experience to go share a table with former adversaries.
nancy

Re: A Stone, A Leaf, A Door

paula on 1/25/02 at 10:51 (071243)

ohmygod someone is talking literature here? i think wolfe is a pretty good novelist. i liked 'look homeward angel'. to get him to write his next book maxwell perkins locked him in a barn and tossed bottles of liquor to him periodically. wolfe was a big influence on kerouac who's 'on the road' and 'dharma bums' played a major role in creating the hippies, the gay and women's liberation movements, the anti vietnam war movement. and the hippies helped popularize birkenstocks so who knows, maybe we have a lot to thank wolfe for. i would recommend 'angel' as wolf's best.

Re: London food

Julie on 1/25/02 at 11:06 (071245)

John, there's no way you could hurt my feelings whatever you said, but I've got to break it to you that you're awfully out of date. Yes, food did not used to be one of London's attractions, but EVERYTHING has changed in the last 10-15 years. Anthony Bourdain compared it to Australia with regard to the blossoming of excellent restaurants of all kinds at all levels.

And if cold beer is what you want, it's available. Lots of folk here think it kills the taste - but I wouldn't expect you to agree. (I know you all have ice-machines in your refrigerators.)

You can buy a larger range of wine in England than you can in France (and probably anywhere else in the world, for all I know). A couple of years ago I asked a French sales guy in my favourite wine store what a French wine seller was doing in London, and he replied that if you work in wine, England is a much better place to work than France: the range is much more varied and interesting.

You'll just have to update your experience one of these days.

Re: A Stone, A Leaf, A Door

nancy s. on 1/25/02 at 15:33 (071283)

for about a decade years ago everyone in my family would write up a book review of each book we read and circulate it via the u.s. mail.

kerouac's 'on the road' was the favorite book of both of my brothers at the time. my mother, wanting to see what the fuss was about, read 'on the road' and sent around her critique.

it began: 'this is the boring chronicle of two pathetic bums criss-crossing the country trying desperately to have fun.' she also mentioned their sexless sex lives.

my older brother put a grade on my mother's book report -- it was a D-minus -- with the command, 'mary jane, please see me after class.'

Re: Necee's Birthday

John h on 1/25/02 at 18:49 (071306)

Hey Julie: how do I go about this? just say Mary I am out of here and headed to the far east. see you in a couple of months. try the cell phone if you need me.

Re: A Stone, A Leaf, A Door

paula on 1/25/02 at 18:52 (071308)

its amazing how 'on the road' keeps grabbing young readers. a schoolteacher friend told me that two teenage students endlessly work on and try to revive an old car for that very criss crossing road trip that mystifies the old and invites the young.

Re: Looking East

Julie on 1/26/02 at 02:48 (071352)

Well, you could ask her to go with you. If she really doesn't want to travel that far, you could ask her how she'd feel if you went on your own for a couple of weeks. Either way she might surprise you. She might even like some time by herself. It's hard to say, everyone's relationship is different, but I travel a lot on my own and it doesn't seem to bother Klaus (who isn't as keen on going places as I am). In fact whenever I come home and ask him if he's missed me, he always tells me how well he slept while I was away.

Oh - I said 'a couple of weeks', but with my recent experience fresh in my mind I'd actually suggest at least three, to give you time to get over whatever bug you might possibly catch from the recycled air on the plane. (Unless, of course, you fly yourself over.)

Watch out for cobras.