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You know you've had foot troubles for too long when...

Posted by Nancy N on 1/22/02 at 05:35 (070837)

...you go to see Lord of the Rings/Fellowship of the Ring and are distracted by FEET the whole time! First it was the odd shape of the hobbits' feet--I couldn't help but think that they looked rather uncomfortable to me, even though they're not dramatically different than human feet. Then the fact that they were barefoot all the time. In the middle of the movie when they are walking through snow those hobbits are STILL in bare feet--my feet were cold just looking at them (please excuse the voice of my grandmother, who would say exactly that at such a sight)!

And at the end of the three-hour movie, which depicts far more than a three-hour story, they're STILL barefoot, and now they've gone over snow, grass, stone, all sorts of nasty stuff... either those critters have some industrial-strength toes (in which case, I want some!), or they're just gluttons for punishment (or maybe they can't get decent shoes for those strange feet--the other characters all wear some sort of boots, but not these guys)!

Like I said, you know you've had foot problems for too long when you go to a movie and are distracted by the feet!!!

Re: You know you've had foot troubles for too long when...

alan k on 1/22/02 at 07:16 (070841)

Hobbits had thick epidermal layers in their soles, and the top of their feet were covered in furry hair. They grew up and lived barefoot, therefore their feet were strong and their musculature was well toned and balanced. They walked soft and almost silently.
Plantar Fasciitis is mentioned nowhere in the Trilogy or the Simarillion, which is an accompanying history.
Feel free to ask me if you need further explanation, I am a professor of anthropology.

alan k

Re: okay....

Carmen H on 1/22/02 at 08:50 (070850)

Okay Nancy....that's exactly what I was thinking. I told my husband during the movie 'Those darn hobbits don't have PF!!!!'

Re: Also, you know you've had foot troubles for too long when...

Carole C on 1/22/02 at 16:39 (070897)

... you go to a lecture at work, on the topic of how electronic communications are going to eliminate paperwork and streamline your job, and while you are listening you find yourself looking at SHOES!

I noticed for the first time today that several of the women are wearing Birkenstock open-backed clogs (some with no socks or stockings!), and that many more of the men than previously seem to be wearing shoes of the sturdy, practical type rather than the type that take a good shine. Hmmm!

Nancy, I haven't seen the movie or read the book, but I am guessing that the reason the hobbits can go barefoot in the snow, grass, and stone like that is because they are hobbits! lol

I love this topic! It's true that feet and shoes have become much more interesting to me since I started having foot problems.

Carole C

Re: Also, you know you've had foot troubles for too long when...

Carole C on 1/22/02 at 16:41 (070898)

Oh, obviously I hadn't read Alan's post before I posted this! Sorry, I just couldn't wait because the topic was such fun. :)

Carole C

Re: You know you've had foot troubles for too long when...

Carol C on 1/22/02 at 20:00 (070916)

If that is the answer to all foot ills, I suggest from this point forward, we never put shoes on children and let them develop strong and muscular,
toned and blanced feet---and maybe they won't have to endure the days of
agony that most of us have....

Re: You know you've had foot troubles for too long when...

Nancy N on 1/22/02 at 20:05 (070917)

You know, I would think there would be some wisdom to this idea. Obviously, the human race did not always have the kinds of sophisticated footwear that we do now. So what happened? Seems to me that either the feet were designed to take a lot of punishment once upon a time, or there were a lot of miserable folks out there just suffering.

I suppose both are possibilities, but would think that the former idea would be the more likely, given the way that nature seems to know best. I could be wrong, of course, but I would like to think that these things were designed to work properly and last for a good long while, and that it is our interference with what nature intended that leads us into these messes!

Re: You know you've had foot troubles for too long when...

Julie on 1/23/02 at 05:16 (070948)

Lots of things happened. For one thing, cities grew up, with pavements and cars and lots and lots of rubbish strewn all over the place - broken glass, tin cans, needles, dog shit, you name it, it's all over our streets. Would you really want children to tackle that stuff barefoot?

(And people started living longer: when the normal lifespan was 27 years, or 41 years, tissues didn't have so much time to wear out.)

I agree that our interference with nature has given rise to all kinds of terrible problems. But it's a fact. We aren't forest dwellers 5,000 years ago, and shoes have developed because they were needed. That may or may not have contributed to our foot problems - but there really is no going back. We live in the culture and in the society we live in, and have to take the rough with the smooth.

Re: You know you've had foot troubles for too long when...

john h on 1/23/02 at 11:29 (070987)

An interesting study, if possible would be to know the incidence of PF among the general popluation against an area such as Applachia where probably many of the kids still go barefoot in the summer and develop very tough feet. Actually it might be interesting to know the incidence of PF between states per 100,000 persons. Would we find more PF in rural or the city. In affluent or depressed areas. Obviously we know that athletes,dancers are more prone to this disease but what other life styles might contribute to this disease. Is there more PF today than 50 or 100 years ago? Certaily fewer people go barefoot, we wear very different shoes. What would be the incidence of PF in 3rd world nations such as the Congo or Rhodesia where most people go barefoot?

Re: Also, you know you've had foot troubles for too long when...

Suzanne D on 1/23/02 at 13:49 (071000)

...you look at wedding gowns and bridesmaid dresses with your daughter, and you cannot get these thoughts out of your head: 'What in the world will I wear on MY feet??! Will I limp when they escort me down the aisle? What is the chance of Birkenstock coming out with a Mother of the Bride shoe??' :-)

Re: ROFL!!!! (nm)

Carole C on 1/23/02 at 16:05 (071007)

.

Re: You know you've had foot troubles for too long when...

Nancy N on 1/23/02 at 16:53 (071017)

I agree, it would be an interesting study--why don't you go for it, John? You could make medical history with the results! Though I also agree with Julie, it's sad to consider that we may inadvertently have set ourselves up for a condition like PF by building cities, etc--but I think it's too late to go back now.

It would still be interesting to know about these other places and their PF incidence, though!

Re: Bridesmaid shoes...

Valerie S on 1/23/02 at 16:54 (071018)

Suzanne...

I am going to be a bridesmaid in my sister's wedding in April, and boy have I been thinking about shoes too! Luckily, the dresses she chose are long, so even if I have to suffer through the ceremony and the pictures, I am already shopping for some Birkenstocks in the color Plum... to change into after the pictures and through the silly reception.

The whole weddding thing is kind of a crazy subject anyways... I am doing the invitations, programs, and the shower... She's getting married because she got pregnant, and we're all trying to act like we are happy about it.

But anyways... I am with you on the shoes... we aren't walking down the aisle, but down a winding staircase ... should be interesting to say the least. Good luck to you.

Val.

Re: Growing up barefoot... some memories

Carole C on 1/23/02 at 18:29 (071032)

When I grew up in Hawaii, going barefoot was not that unusual. Wearing shoes was, in our little beach community, even in restaurants or grocery stores in those days. The only foot problem that I recall ever having was blisters when I tried to wear sandals to high school (so I gave up and just carried them with me on top of my books... that way they didn't get too wet in rain showers, either).

At 18 I routinely climbed several 2000-3000 ft tall cliff-like mountains made of lava rock barefoot, often carrying my shoes with me because my toes were more surefooted and could cling to the rocks. Every morning before school or work I walked 2 miles down the beach and swam back, all barefoot, just to wake up. My feet were tough and calloused, but always felt wonderful and healthy. I do not remember ever seeing anybody with foot problems, but then most of the people that I knew were young, healthy, and got lots of exercise out in the sun.

I would guess that PF could possibly be less likely in regions where most people are barefoot.

Carole C

Re: Bridesmaid shoes...

Suzanne D on 1/23/02 at 20:42 (071055)

Your idea of changing into the Birkenstocks sounds good! With your long dress, they will hardly be noticable anyway, and with the plum color, that will make them look especially nice.

I have until March 2003 (my daughter's wedding) to try to find something appropriate and HOPEFULLY have my feet be in a little better shape. But it's not going to be easy!

Good luck to you, too! :-)

Re: You know you've had foot troubles for too long when...

Julie on 1/24/02 at 03:32 (071083)

In places like the Congo people are too busy dying of Aids (and at the moment coping with volcanoes) to notice something like a sore heel. I'm afraid your research would be skewed, John.

Re: Bridesmaid shoes...

Carmen H on 1/26/02 at 10:52 (071387)

Be CAreful...my bridesmaid had PF and heelspurs and didn't tell me how bad it was and by the end of the night she was barefoot for about 4 hours...poor thing!
I would have told her to wear Birks!

Re: You know you've had foot troubles for too long when...

alan k on 1/22/02 at 07:16 (070841)

Hobbits had thick epidermal layers in their soles, and the top of their feet were covered in furry hair. They grew up and lived barefoot, therefore their feet were strong and their musculature was well toned and balanced. They walked soft and almost silently.
Plantar Fasciitis is mentioned nowhere in the Trilogy or the Simarillion, which is an accompanying history.
Feel free to ask me if you need further explanation, I am a professor of anthropology.

alan k

Re: okay....

Carmen H on 1/22/02 at 08:50 (070850)

Okay Nancy....that's exactly what I was thinking. I told my husband during the movie 'Those darn hobbits don't have PF!!!!'

Re: Also, you know you've had foot troubles for too long when...

Carole C on 1/22/02 at 16:39 (070897)

... you go to a lecture at work, on the topic of how electronic communications are going to eliminate paperwork and streamline your job, and while you are listening you find yourself looking at SHOES!

I noticed for the first time today that several of the women are wearing Birkenstock open-backed clogs (some with no socks or stockings!), and that many more of the men than previously seem to be wearing shoes of the sturdy, practical type rather than the type that take a good shine. Hmmm!

Nancy, I haven't seen the movie or read the book, but I am guessing that the reason the hobbits can go barefoot in the snow, grass, and stone like that is because they are hobbits! lol

I love this topic! It's true that feet and shoes have become much more interesting to me since I started having foot problems.

Carole C

Re: Also, you know you've had foot troubles for too long when...

Carole C on 1/22/02 at 16:41 (070898)

Oh, obviously I hadn't read Alan's post before I posted this! Sorry, I just couldn't wait because the topic was such fun. :)

Carole C

Re: You know you've had foot troubles for too long when...

Carol C on 1/22/02 at 20:00 (070916)

If that is the answer to all foot ills, I suggest from this point forward, we never put shoes on children and let them develop strong and muscular,
toned and blanced feet---and maybe they won't have to endure the days of
agony that most of us have....

Re: You know you've had foot troubles for too long when...

Nancy N on 1/22/02 at 20:05 (070917)

You know, I would think there would be some wisdom to this idea. Obviously, the human race did not always have the kinds of sophisticated footwear that we do now. So what happened? Seems to me that either the feet were designed to take a lot of punishment once upon a time, or there were a lot of miserable folks out there just suffering.

I suppose both are possibilities, but would think that the former idea would be the more likely, given the way that nature seems to know best. I could be wrong, of course, but I would like to think that these things were designed to work properly and last for a good long while, and that it is our interference with what nature intended that leads us into these messes!

Re: You know you've had foot troubles for too long when...

Julie on 1/23/02 at 05:16 (070948)

Lots of things happened. For one thing, cities grew up, with pavements and cars and lots and lots of rubbish strewn all over the place - broken glass, tin cans, needles, dog shit, you name it, it's all over our streets. Would you really want children to tackle that stuff barefoot?

(And people started living longer: when the normal lifespan was 27 years, or 41 years, tissues didn't have so much time to wear out.)

I agree that our interference with nature has given rise to all kinds of terrible problems. But it's a fact. We aren't forest dwellers 5,000 years ago, and shoes have developed because they were needed. That may or may not have contributed to our foot problems - but there really is no going back. We live in the culture and in the society we live in, and have to take the rough with the smooth.

Re: You know you've had foot troubles for too long when...

john h on 1/23/02 at 11:29 (070987)

An interesting study, if possible would be to know the incidence of PF among the general popluation against an area such as Applachia where probably many of the kids still go barefoot in the summer and develop very tough feet. Actually it might be interesting to know the incidence of PF between states per 100,000 persons. Would we find more PF in rural or the city. In affluent or depressed areas. Obviously we know that athletes,dancers are more prone to this disease but what other life styles might contribute to this disease. Is there more PF today than 50 or 100 years ago? Certaily fewer people go barefoot, we wear very different shoes. What would be the incidence of PF in 3rd world nations such as the Congo or Rhodesia where most people go barefoot?

Re: Also, you know you've had foot troubles for too long when...

Suzanne D on 1/23/02 at 13:49 (071000)

...you look at wedding gowns and bridesmaid dresses with your daughter, and you cannot get these thoughts out of your head: 'What in the world will I wear on MY feet??! Will I limp when they escort me down the aisle? What is the chance of Birkenstock coming out with a Mother of the Bride shoe??' :-)

Re: ROFL!!!! (nm)

Carole C on 1/23/02 at 16:05 (071007)

.

Re: You know you've had foot troubles for too long when...

Nancy N on 1/23/02 at 16:53 (071017)

I agree, it would be an interesting study--why don't you go for it, John? You could make medical history with the results! Though I also agree with Julie, it's sad to consider that we may inadvertently have set ourselves up for a condition like PF by building cities, etc--but I think it's too late to go back now.

It would still be interesting to know about these other places and their PF incidence, though!

Re: Bridesmaid shoes...

Valerie S on 1/23/02 at 16:54 (071018)

Suzanne...

I am going to be a bridesmaid in my sister's wedding in April, and boy have I been thinking about shoes too! Luckily, the dresses she chose are long, so even if I have to suffer through the ceremony and the pictures, I am already shopping for some Birkenstocks in the color Plum... to change into after the pictures and through the silly reception.

The whole weddding thing is kind of a crazy subject anyways... I am doing the invitations, programs, and the shower... She's getting married because she got pregnant, and we're all trying to act like we are happy about it.

But anyways... I am with you on the shoes... we aren't walking down the aisle, but down a winding staircase ... should be interesting to say the least. Good luck to you.

Val.

Re: Growing up barefoot... some memories

Carole C on 1/23/02 at 18:29 (071032)

When I grew up in Hawaii, going barefoot was not that unusual. Wearing shoes was, in our little beach community, even in restaurants or grocery stores in those days. The only foot problem that I recall ever having was blisters when I tried to wear sandals to high school (so I gave up and just carried them with me on top of my books... that way they didn't get too wet in rain showers, either).

At 18 I routinely climbed several 2000-3000 ft tall cliff-like mountains made of lava rock barefoot, often carrying my shoes with me because my toes were more surefooted and could cling to the rocks. Every morning before school or work I walked 2 miles down the beach and swam back, all barefoot, just to wake up. My feet were tough and calloused, but always felt wonderful and healthy. I do not remember ever seeing anybody with foot problems, but then most of the people that I knew were young, healthy, and got lots of exercise out in the sun.

I would guess that PF could possibly be less likely in regions where most people are barefoot.

Carole C

Re: Bridesmaid shoes...

Suzanne D on 1/23/02 at 20:42 (071055)

Your idea of changing into the Birkenstocks sounds good! With your long dress, they will hardly be noticable anyway, and with the plum color, that will make them look especially nice.

I have until March 2003 (my daughter's wedding) to try to find something appropriate and HOPEFULLY have my feet be in a little better shape. But it's not going to be easy!

Good luck to you, too! :-)

Re: You know you've had foot troubles for too long when...

Julie on 1/24/02 at 03:32 (071083)

In places like the Congo people are too busy dying of Aids (and at the moment coping with volcanoes) to notice something like a sore heel. I'm afraid your research would be skewed, John.

Re: Bridesmaid shoes...

Carmen H on 1/26/02 at 10:52 (071387)

Be CAreful...my bridesmaid had PF and heelspurs and didn't tell me how bad it was and by the end of the night she was barefoot for about 4 hours...poor thing!
I would have told her to wear Birks!