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reflexology invaluable part of healing process

Posted by eric k. on 1/28/02 at 17:04 (071666)

i have worked as a reflexologist for a 7 years and have found that working out the calcification and opening the entire heal area to blood and nerve acitivity is a key componant of healing as opposed to merely providing temporary relief from pain. along with active participation of the client(icing, stretching, and supporting the arch) reflexology is a critical to speeding up an often long and painful process. i will not even address the harmful effects of steroidal injections, let alone surgery. the most information regarding the benefits of reflexology for plantar fasciitis is a line or two stating self-massage by an amateur 'can be helpful.' i am on a crusade of sorts to educate the millions of people who suffer senselessly, spend loads of money and put tremendous effort into the wrong modalities. weekly reflexology for 4-8 weeks coupled with active effort by the patient can yield healthy, happy feet. i live and work in the northern Bay Area and would be happy to answer any questions. my e-mail is (email removed). best of luck in your pursuits of a pain-free life.

Re: reflexology invaluable part of healing process

SteveP on 1/28/02 at 17:14 (071672)

Hi Eric --- What type of stretching do you recommend? I hope it isn't weightbearing. My PT caused me a lot of harm by insisting on weightbearing stretches. I always speak out against them. IMO, they are the worst thing a therapist can recommend to person with PF, yet they seem to be widely recommended. Any thoughts?

Steve

Re: What's reflexology?

Carole C in NOLA on 1/28/02 at 17:29 (071679)

What is reflexology? Is it massage therapy? Please excuse my ignorance.

How is it done? Can we learn to do it ourselves?

Carole C

Re: What's reflexology?

Carmen H on 1/28/02 at 20:36 (071717)

Reflexology is the belief that your feet mirror your body...on Other words that if you have a stomach ache you can massage the part of the feet that relates to the stomch and it can help your stomach....
this is just an example. But there are a lot of great books on it. I am NO expert but have books on it....and have a read a little on it.
I have one book that's got great pictures and diagrams.

http://www.reflexology.org/

that may give you some sites to look at.
Good luck. and you're NOT ignorant Carole. :-)

Re: What's reflexology?

Carole C in NOLA on 1/28/02 at 20:48 (071719)

Thank you, Carmen! That's very interesting. It sounds like it could be related to acupuncture in some ways, maybe. I'll check out the website.

Carole C

Re: What's reflexology?

wendyn on 1/28/02 at 22:22 (071731)

I don't know what I think of reflexology.

When I was at yoga one night, one woman had a sore spot on her foot - and she and the instructor were discussing what it might be from - according to reflexology.

They decided it might be because of problems with her bladder or kidneys.

I thought to myself - what if she just has a sore foot from new shoes?

Or from walking funny?

What does reflexology say about those of us who have pain all over our feet?

That our whole bodies are a mess?

Then again.......!!!! :)

Re: What's reflexology?

eric k. on 1/29/02 at 13:57 (071815)

i want to spend some time addressing all of your questions and i must say i am surprised at how quickly the responses came back to me. shows how much pain can force you to focus on changing patterns and habits. a powerful realization. first off i wanted to say there is nothing wrong with being ignorant, sometimes it is even helpful. one of the biggest hurdles in my work is simlpy educating people on what i am doing. once they are receiving a treatment their bodies remember and do some of the educating for me. in the same way i don't heal people i simply remind their bodies of what the healthy flow of energy (blood and nerve activity) to a damaged or overworked area feels like. then the body with all of it's unbelievable intricacies heals itself.
what is reflexology is a common question. it is an over-simplification to say that every nereve response in your foot 'means' something in another part of your body. if you stub your big toe it will not automatically reflex and make your corresponding area of your body(head and interior of skull) along the same meridian hurt. it can simply mean that your big toe freakin' hurts. a meridian is a channel through which energy flows. if the body is healthy the energy will flow through the circuit unimpeded bringing blood and nerve activity to replenish and invigorate the entire meridian. the end points or turning points in the channel end in your ears, hands and feet. this is where reflexologists interface with the body to stimulate the flow. if a part of your body is hurting, say you have a bad back, then the corresponding part of your foot will have calcification or build up of residue in the feet and hands because the energy in that meridian is blocked further up the channel. because of this blockage up the channel the blood and nerve activity will not run its course and flush out the ends of the channel. that is what is meant when we say the end of the channel 'mirrors' the body. if however you have injury in the end of the channel as with plantar fasciitis then the calcification or build up will happen in the immediate area (i.e. bone spurs and excessive tightness due to lack of the bodie's natural flushing). this is why reflexology can be so helpful for this condition because it is the constriction and lack of energy flow that creates a condition that gets worse and worse. you need to create space for the body to heal itself. all of the calcification needs to be flushed out to prevent further blockage. reflexology directly breaks up the blockage and draws the energy to that area. stretching is also one of the best ways to create space for it allows the body access to the area so it can heal itself. icing prevents inflamation which once again creates space. comfortable shoes that support the arch prevent the muscles and tendons from tightening up and blocking the flow. proper footwear and arch support physically create space and facilitate the energy flow.
any of these done alone can yield benefits but the client orchestrating all of them with loving intention towards healing oneself will give relief that often astonishes.
as far as stretching being wieght bearing or non-weight bearing this depends on the severity of your condition. i don't think we can say that someone with a mild case could not benefit from a wall stretch without doing damage. whereas a severe case may agonize over the lightest of stretching. your body will tell you what is too much. it is always best to start conservative with mild stretching lying on your back with a towel or strap across the ball of your foot. lie comfortably and with a bent knee stretch the toes back towards you. find the edge where you are doing work and feeling progress without pain. consistency and kindness to yourself will always yield the best results. i am in the process of going through a yoga instructor certification course and should be more knowledgable in a few months in regards to stretching.
reflexology is based on alot of the same principles as accupressure and accupuncture. they all manipulate the flow of energy at various points along the body. it is more useful in situations where the person is not comfortable being touched in certain areas or discomfort with needles. as far as plantar fasciitis is concerned it is the ideal modality because it works directly on the source of the problem and helps the body heal itself as opposed to merely masking symptoms. i don't want to misrepresent the process, working out the build up in your heel will be painful but you are probably used to pain by now. the results my sister(who has worked as a reflexoligist for about the same time frame) and i have been wonderful. she lives and works in Kansas City and has 33-50%of her clients see because of this condition. i am in the north Bay area if anyone is in this region. if not seek out a local reflexologist on the web and through a referral network. it can make such a difference.
incidentally you can work on yourself. there are numerous books available. check your library and bookstore to find which one works for you. the more pictures the better. don't focus so much on learning everything right away, trust your intuition and be consistent, gentle and kind to yourself. working with a trained professional at the start is the best and they should be able to teach you how to work on yourself far more effectively than any book.

as an aside i don't know how to use a chat room so excuse my ignorance. that is why i included my e-mail. (email removed) please write back to here and explain how to use chat room. i look forward to hearing from you.

Re: What's reflexology?

Carole C in NOLA on 1/29/02 at 17:20 (071836)

Very informative. Thank you, Eric!

Carole C

Re: What's reflexology?

wendyn on 1/29/02 at 18:47 (071852)

Has anyone written to Eric = this is not a chat room, but he seems to be a wealth of knowledge on this subject...a handy person to have around!

Re: If only it were this easy !

BrianG on 1/29/02 at 22:31 (071879)

Hi Eric,

A chat room is where 2 or more people are all logged on, and chatting, in real time. This is a message board. People will come, read, and maybe post if something interests them. You may want to break your posts up into paragraphs. Many people can't read a long string of sentences, like what you wrote. Others won't even bother to try.

Also, I don't know how well you type, but try to start each sentence with a capital letter. I hope you don't think I'm the internet police, it's just that there is a sort of courtesy, and grammer, that has evolved over time. I don't have spell check, but it's a good thing too. Good luck

BCG

Re: What's reflexology?

Julie on 1/30/02 at 07:58 (071902)

Hello Eric, and welcome to heelspurs.com.

I know a little about reflexology, and have done a couple of day courses in it, but your explanation of it is the best and most thorough I've read or heard. Thank you very much for it. Please stick around, because I think you're going to be a real help to people here. That's what these message boards are about.

I have a question for you. A year or so, when my PF was still active (it's resolved now) I was giving a yoga workshop and took the opportunity, as I always do, to explain about PF. Afterwards a practitioner of hand reflexology who was attending approached me and advised me to work not on my heel, but on the corresponding point on my hand (in the pad below the thumb), and I did so. I can't say whether or not it helped, because I was using several modalities at the time, and my PF was gradually improving. But I'd be interested to know what you think of this.

Thanks very much again for your input, and please come again.

Re: What's reflexology?

paula on 1/30/02 at 09:15 (071912)

eric , thank you for sharing. as you can see i think not capitalizing is a good idea. it is the mark of genuis in my opinion. make your posts as long or as short as you wish. i like information. the more the better on this subject i feel. it took some time and thought to share your info with us and i appreciate it. i am a terrible speller and so is dr z, the great and good podiatrist who helps us here. when we type fast to communicate here, in my opinion, it is content that counts , not grammar, not spelling. you are a sharing person and that is what is lovely to me. my job requires endless typo ing so it is fun and a relief to just type it out and post it here and let the content stand by itself. i think it makes it more human communication. and less of a hassle all around. but i am one of the broken down old hippies here and this is just my way of being casual. hey it could be worse, i could endlessly quote e e cummings.:)

Re: hand vs. foot reflexology

eric k. on 1/30/02 at 12:20 (071940)

thanks again for your feedback on my unedited, first draft of a grammatically close-enough draft to get my point across some misspellings piece of message not chatroom in an occasional run-on sentence that my 7th grade English teacher might cringe at style. But seriously, it is wonderful to share. on the question of hand vs. foot reflexology. working directly on the foot for PF would be most effective unless the pain was so severe that you had to go to Plan B, the hands. reflexology is most effective when the practitioner is accurate with the point of contact in stimulating the reflexes. the hands generally are not as sensitive to the touch as the feet because of the use and abuse they receive on a daily basis. feet receive a comparable if not greater amount of abuse, but of a different nature. more gross pressure of body weight and cramming into shoes. this is why feet are so responsive to specific and gentle touch from tickling to reflexology. hand are probably our most acute sense after visual and audio. they are so used to touching and pulling off incredible feats of manual dexterity. while this is fabulous for our daily function it does not leave them as receptive to reflexology. hands are easy to access for a quick relief when taking off your shoes and getting comfortable would be inappropriate or inconvenient, but as far as overall effectiveness nothing works as well as the feet. particularly for a foot issue like PF.

everyone out there step away from your screens, go outside, breath some fresh air, and love yourself.

Re: hand vs. foot reflexology

Julie on 1/30/02 at 15:04 (071963)

That's interesting, Eric. Thank you for taking time to explain this.

Re: hand vs. foot reflexology

Julie on 1/30/02 at 15:10 (071965)

That's interesting, Eric. Thank you for taking time to explain this.

Re: hand vs. foot reflexology

John h on 1/30/02 at 16:29 (071973)

Julie
Julie
I think you caught the double post from me
I think you caught the double post form me
I got cured
I got cured
I do not know how
I do not know how

Re: Eric --- You are wrong about weightbearing stretches

SteveP on 1/30/02 at 20:40 (072003)

Eric -- I must disagree with you about weightbearing stretches. They are ALWAYS harmful to people with PF.

Wall stretches have aggravated many a PF patient's condition.

Respectfully...........Steve

Re: Eric --- You are wrong about weightbearing stretches

paula on 1/30/02 at 21:14 (072010)

steve maybe there are some stretches that work for some of us and others that don't as opposed to eric just being wrong ? i think i read somewhere to tilt foot to outside to avoid stretching post tib. for the wall stretch. then i seem to remember someone turns their foot to the inside. when i turn my foot, in the pool, hardly any weight, it doesnt seem to stretch what i need to be stretched. the eccentric exercise i found recently sorta is a weight bearing stretch and it hasnt hurt me so far. but i put almost no weight in as i carefully try it out. wall stretches and even bed stretches seem to damage me if i put weight on.

Re: What is your observed success rate for PF? (nm)

elliott on 1/30/02 at 22:01 (072019)

.

Re: Eric --- You are wrong about weightbearing stretches

paula on 1/30/02 at 22:22 (072024)

p.s. i consider a weighted stretch to be even a pull on a theraband or towel and maybe this is not the common way to think of it. but it is a little weight. i was reading about loaded stretches and i assume that also means weight of some sort. i have been strethcing with no load at all till recently and getting just nowhere, so no i put a little on, with a theraband and sitting with a tilt board and in the pool with very little weight. mabe we could get real specific on thte streches that work for us. everytime we do i find it useful.

Re: hand vs. foot reflexology

Julie on 1/31/02 at 03:36 (072041)

John
John

I am hoping for a cure
I am hoping for a pure (I mean cure)

Now Paula has caught the doublebug too
Now Paula has caught the doublebug too

All the best
All the best

Re: Eric --- You are wrong about weightbearing stretches

nancy s. on 1/31/02 at 05:24 (072047)

paula, actually, using a theraband or towel or anything to stretch while not standing on your foot is nonweightbearing.

weightbearing means you are allowing your foot to bear the full or partial weight of your body.

weightbearing stretches while in the throes of pf and various tendonitises always made me worse, and the vast experience on these boards has almost always shown this to be the case.
even now, 90% better, the only weightbearing exercise i do is walking. i believe it was the gentle, very gradually increased nonweightbearing stretching and strengthening that finally got me on my feet -- along with about ten other factors, but weightbearing stretching wasn't among them.
nancy

Re: hand vs. foot reflexology

john h on 1/31/02 at 09:27 (072060)

good luck julie and paula.
good luck julie and paula

Re: Eric --- You are wrong about weightbearing stretches

JudyS on 1/31/02 at 09:34 (072061)

I ditto NancyS on this.......weightbearing stretches always did me more harm......and I kept them up thinking more is better..
In fact, I think that perhaps overstretching is the truest culprit of all. I'm convinced that, with my 'more is better' attitude, even with non-weightbearing stretches, made things worse.

Re: Eric --- You are wrong about weightbearing stretches

john h on 1/31/02 at 12:50 (072082)

I am with you 100% on overstretching Judy and in particular on the runners stretch and hanging on the stairs. I read somewhere that many people tear the fascia when trying to push a car. This is basically the runners stretch where you put a tremendous load on the supposed non stretchable tendon the fascia.

Re: Eric --- You are wrong about weightbearing stretches

Carole C in NOLA on 1/31/02 at 13:37 (072091)

That makes sense to me, Judy. I haven't ever done any weightbearing stretches since my pedorthist told me not to. And, although I do my non-weightbearing stretches, I don't do very many of them simply because I haven't got my act together. I always do them in the morning, and maybe once in the evening, but that's about it. I'm healing pretty fast, so maybe that is fortunate.

Carole C

Re: reflexology invaluable part of healing process

SteveP on 1/28/02 at 17:14 (071672)

Hi Eric --- What type of stretching do you recommend? I hope it isn't weightbearing. My PT caused me a lot of harm by insisting on weightbearing stretches. I always speak out against them. IMO, they are the worst thing a therapist can recommend to person with PF, yet they seem to be widely recommended. Any thoughts?

Steve

Re: What's reflexology?

Carole C in NOLA on 1/28/02 at 17:29 (071679)

What is reflexology? Is it massage therapy? Please excuse my ignorance.

How is it done? Can we learn to do it ourselves?

Carole C

Re: What's reflexology?

Carmen H on 1/28/02 at 20:36 (071717)

Reflexology is the belief that your feet mirror your body...on Other words that if you have a stomach ache you can massage the part of the feet that relates to the stomch and it can help your stomach....
this is just an example. But there are a lot of great books on it. I am NO expert but have books on it....and have a read a little on it.
I have one book that's got great pictures and diagrams.

http://www.reflexology.org/

that may give you some sites to look at.
Good luck. and you're NOT ignorant Carole. :-)

Re: What's reflexology?

Carole C in NOLA on 1/28/02 at 20:48 (071719)

Thank you, Carmen! That's very interesting. It sounds like it could be related to acupuncture in some ways, maybe. I'll check out the website.

Carole C

Re: What's reflexology?

wendyn on 1/28/02 at 22:22 (071731)

I don't know what I think of reflexology.

When I was at yoga one night, one woman had a sore spot on her foot - and she and the instructor were discussing what it might be from - according to reflexology.

They decided it might be because of problems with her bladder or kidneys.

I thought to myself - what if she just has a sore foot from new shoes?

Or from walking funny?

What does reflexology say about those of us who have pain all over our feet?

That our whole bodies are a mess?

Then again.......!!!! :)

Re: What's reflexology?

eric k. on 1/29/02 at 13:57 (071815)

i want to spend some time addressing all of your questions and i must say i am surprised at how quickly the responses came back to me. shows how much pain can force you to focus on changing patterns and habits. a powerful realization. first off i wanted to say there is nothing wrong with being ignorant, sometimes it is even helpful. one of the biggest hurdles in my work is simlpy educating people on what i am doing. once they are receiving a treatment their bodies remember and do some of the educating for me. in the same way i don't heal people i simply remind their bodies of what the healthy flow of energy (blood and nerve activity) to a damaged or overworked area feels like. then the body with all of it's unbelievable intricacies heals itself.
what is reflexology is a common question. it is an over-simplification to say that every nereve response in your foot 'means' something in another part of your body. if you stub your big toe it will not automatically reflex and make your corresponding area of your body(head and interior of skull) along the same meridian hurt. it can simply mean that your big toe freakin' hurts. a meridian is a channel through which energy flows. if the body is healthy the energy will flow through the circuit unimpeded bringing blood and nerve activity to replenish and invigorate the entire meridian. the end points or turning points in the channel end in your ears, hands and feet. this is where reflexologists interface with the body to stimulate the flow. if a part of your body is hurting, say you have a bad back, then the corresponding part of your foot will have calcification or build up of residue in the feet and hands because the energy in that meridian is blocked further up the channel. because of this blockage up the channel the blood and nerve activity will not run its course and flush out the ends of the channel. that is what is meant when we say the end of the channel 'mirrors' the body. if however you have injury in the end of the channel as with plantar fasciitis then the calcification or build up will happen in the immediate area (i.e. bone spurs and excessive tightness due to lack of the bodie's natural flushing). this is why reflexology can be so helpful for this condition because it is the constriction and lack of energy flow that creates a condition that gets worse and worse. you need to create space for the body to heal itself. all of the calcification needs to be flushed out to prevent further blockage. reflexology directly breaks up the blockage and draws the energy to that area. stretching is also one of the best ways to create space for it allows the body access to the area so it can heal itself. icing prevents inflamation which once again creates space. comfortable shoes that support the arch prevent the muscles and tendons from tightening up and blocking the flow. proper footwear and arch support physically create space and facilitate the energy flow.
any of these done alone can yield benefits but the client orchestrating all of them with loving intention towards healing oneself will give relief that often astonishes.
as far as stretching being wieght bearing or non-weight bearing this depends on the severity of your condition. i don't think we can say that someone with a mild case could not benefit from a wall stretch without doing damage. whereas a severe case may agonize over the lightest of stretching. your body will tell you what is too much. it is always best to start conservative with mild stretching lying on your back with a towel or strap across the ball of your foot. lie comfortably and with a bent knee stretch the toes back towards you. find the edge where you are doing work and feeling progress without pain. consistency and kindness to yourself will always yield the best results. i am in the process of going through a yoga instructor certification course and should be more knowledgable in a few months in regards to stretching.
reflexology is based on alot of the same principles as accupressure and accupuncture. they all manipulate the flow of energy at various points along the body. it is more useful in situations where the person is not comfortable being touched in certain areas or discomfort with needles. as far as plantar fasciitis is concerned it is the ideal modality because it works directly on the source of the problem and helps the body heal itself as opposed to merely masking symptoms. i don't want to misrepresent the process, working out the build up in your heel will be painful but you are probably used to pain by now. the results my sister(who has worked as a reflexoligist for about the same time frame) and i have been wonderful. she lives and works in Kansas City and has 33-50%of her clients see because of this condition. i am in the north Bay area if anyone is in this region. if not seek out a local reflexologist on the web and through a referral network. it can make such a difference.
incidentally you can work on yourself. there are numerous books available. check your library and bookstore to find which one works for you. the more pictures the better. don't focus so much on learning everything right away, trust your intuition and be consistent, gentle and kind to yourself. working with a trained professional at the start is the best and they should be able to teach you how to work on yourself far more effectively than any book.

as an aside i don't know how to use a chat room so excuse my ignorance. that is why i included my e-mail. (email removed) please write back to here and explain how to use chat room. i look forward to hearing from you.

Re: What's reflexology?

Carole C in NOLA on 1/29/02 at 17:20 (071836)

Very informative. Thank you, Eric!

Carole C

Re: What's reflexology?

wendyn on 1/29/02 at 18:47 (071852)

Has anyone written to Eric = this is not a chat room, but he seems to be a wealth of knowledge on this subject...a handy person to have around!

Re: If only it were this easy !

BrianG on 1/29/02 at 22:31 (071879)

Hi Eric,

A chat room is where 2 or more people are all logged on, and chatting, in real time. This is a message board. People will come, read, and maybe post if something interests them. You may want to break your posts up into paragraphs. Many people can't read a long string of sentences, like what you wrote. Others won't even bother to try.

Also, I don't know how well you type, but try to start each sentence with a capital letter. I hope you don't think I'm the internet police, it's just that there is a sort of courtesy, and grammer, that has evolved over time. I don't have spell check, but it's a good thing too. Good luck

BCG

Re: What's reflexology?

Julie on 1/30/02 at 07:58 (071902)

Hello Eric, and welcome to heelspurs.com.

I know a little about reflexology, and have done a couple of day courses in it, but your explanation of it is the best and most thorough I've read or heard. Thank you very much for it. Please stick around, because I think you're going to be a real help to people here. That's what these message boards are about.

I have a question for you. A year or so, when my PF was still active (it's resolved now) I was giving a yoga workshop and took the opportunity, as I always do, to explain about PF. Afterwards a practitioner of hand reflexology who was attending approached me and advised me to work not on my heel, but on the corresponding point on my hand (in the pad below the thumb), and I did so. I can't say whether or not it helped, because I was using several modalities at the time, and my PF was gradually improving. But I'd be interested to know what you think of this.

Thanks very much again for your input, and please come again.

Re: What's reflexology?

paula on 1/30/02 at 09:15 (071912)

eric , thank you for sharing. as you can see i think not capitalizing is a good idea. it is the mark of genuis in my opinion. make your posts as long or as short as you wish. i like information. the more the better on this subject i feel. it took some time and thought to share your info with us and i appreciate it. i am a terrible speller and so is dr z, the great and good podiatrist who helps us here. when we type fast to communicate here, in my opinion, it is content that counts , not grammar, not spelling. you are a sharing person and that is what is lovely to me. my job requires endless typo ing so it is fun and a relief to just type it out and post it here and let the content stand by itself. i think it makes it more human communication. and less of a hassle all around. but i am one of the broken down old hippies here and this is just my way of being casual. hey it could be worse, i could endlessly quote e e cummings.:)

Re: hand vs. foot reflexology

eric k. on 1/30/02 at 12:20 (071940)

thanks again for your feedback on my unedited, first draft of a grammatically close-enough draft to get my point across some misspellings piece of message not chatroom in an occasional run-on sentence that my 7th grade English teacher might cringe at style. But seriously, it is wonderful to share. on the question of hand vs. foot reflexology. working directly on the foot for PF would be most effective unless the pain was so severe that you had to go to Plan B, the hands. reflexology is most effective when the practitioner is accurate with the point of contact in stimulating the reflexes. the hands generally are not as sensitive to the touch as the feet because of the use and abuse they receive on a daily basis. feet receive a comparable if not greater amount of abuse, but of a different nature. more gross pressure of body weight and cramming into shoes. this is why feet are so responsive to specific and gentle touch from tickling to reflexology. hand are probably our most acute sense after visual and audio. they are so used to touching and pulling off incredible feats of manual dexterity. while this is fabulous for our daily function it does not leave them as receptive to reflexology. hands are easy to access for a quick relief when taking off your shoes and getting comfortable would be inappropriate or inconvenient, but as far as overall effectiveness nothing works as well as the feet. particularly for a foot issue like PF.

everyone out there step away from your screens, go outside, breath some fresh air, and love yourself.

Re: hand vs. foot reflexology

Julie on 1/30/02 at 15:04 (071963)

That's interesting, Eric. Thank you for taking time to explain this.

Re: hand vs. foot reflexology

Julie on 1/30/02 at 15:10 (071965)

That's interesting, Eric. Thank you for taking time to explain this.

Re: hand vs. foot reflexology

John h on 1/30/02 at 16:29 (071973)

Julie
Julie
I think you caught the double post from me
I think you caught the double post form me
I got cured
I got cured
I do not know how
I do not know how

Re: Eric --- You are wrong about weightbearing stretches

SteveP on 1/30/02 at 20:40 (072003)

Eric -- I must disagree with you about weightbearing stretches. They are ALWAYS harmful to people with PF.

Wall stretches have aggravated many a PF patient's condition.

Respectfully...........Steve

Re: Eric --- You are wrong about weightbearing stretches

paula on 1/30/02 at 21:14 (072010)

steve maybe there are some stretches that work for some of us and others that don't as opposed to eric just being wrong ? i think i read somewhere to tilt foot to outside to avoid stretching post tib. for the wall stretch. then i seem to remember someone turns their foot to the inside. when i turn my foot, in the pool, hardly any weight, it doesnt seem to stretch what i need to be stretched. the eccentric exercise i found recently sorta is a weight bearing stretch and it hasnt hurt me so far. but i put almost no weight in as i carefully try it out. wall stretches and even bed stretches seem to damage me if i put weight on.

Re: What is your observed success rate for PF? (nm)

elliott on 1/30/02 at 22:01 (072019)

.

Re: Eric --- You are wrong about weightbearing stretches

paula on 1/30/02 at 22:22 (072024)

p.s. i consider a weighted stretch to be even a pull on a theraband or towel and maybe this is not the common way to think of it. but it is a little weight. i was reading about loaded stretches and i assume that also means weight of some sort. i have been strethcing with no load at all till recently and getting just nowhere, so no i put a little on, with a theraband and sitting with a tilt board and in the pool with very little weight. mabe we could get real specific on thte streches that work for us. everytime we do i find it useful.

Re: hand vs. foot reflexology

Julie on 1/31/02 at 03:36 (072041)

John
John

I am hoping for a cure
I am hoping for a pure (I mean cure)

Now Paula has caught the doublebug too
Now Paula has caught the doublebug too

All the best
All the best

Re: Eric --- You are wrong about weightbearing stretches

nancy s. on 1/31/02 at 05:24 (072047)

paula, actually, using a theraband or towel or anything to stretch while not standing on your foot is nonweightbearing.

weightbearing means you are allowing your foot to bear the full or partial weight of your body.

weightbearing stretches while in the throes of pf and various tendonitises always made me worse, and the vast experience on these boards has almost always shown this to be the case.
even now, 90% better, the only weightbearing exercise i do is walking. i believe it was the gentle, very gradually increased nonweightbearing stretching and strengthening that finally got me on my feet -- along with about ten other factors, but weightbearing stretching wasn't among them.
nancy

Re: hand vs. foot reflexology

john h on 1/31/02 at 09:27 (072060)

good luck julie and paula.
good luck julie and paula

Re: Eric --- You are wrong about weightbearing stretches

JudyS on 1/31/02 at 09:34 (072061)

I ditto NancyS on this.......weightbearing stretches always did me more harm......and I kept them up thinking more is better..
In fact, I think that perhaps overstretching is the truest culprit of all. I'm convinced that, with my 'more is better' attitude, even with non-weightbearing stretches, made things worse.

Re: Eric --- You are wrong about weightbearing stretches

john h on 1/31/02 at 12:50 (072082)

I am with you 100% on overstretching Judy and in particular on the runners stretch and hanging on the stairs. I read somewhere that many people tear the fascia when trying to push a car. This is basically the runners stretch where you put a tremendous load on the supposed non stretchable tendon the fascia.

Re: Eric --- You are wrong about weightbearing stretches

Carole C in NOLA on 1/31/02 at 13:37 (072091)

That makes sense to me, Judy. I haven't ever done any weightbearing stretches since my pedorthist told me not to. And, although I do my non-weightbearing stretches, I don't do very many of them simply because I haven't got my act together. I always do them in the morning, and maybe once in the evening, but that's about it. I'm healing pretty fast, so maybe that is fortunate.

Carole C