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Me the snowboard instructor...again

Posted by Jane on 2/01/02 at 15:31 (072200)

Hi!

I was posted here about a month ago. I have had 'numb' toes since the begining of January. I went to the Dr and he said that he has seen this before and that he expected it to go away on it's own. Well, it is a month later and I still have numb toes.They actually pain at times...and the inside of my ankle as well. I'm guessing that this is not normal and I should probably go back to the Dr. Just wondering if anyone has any comments on this. I really hate going to the Dr and I really don't want to take a day off of work unless I have to.

Jane

Re: Me the snowboard instructor...again

BrianG on 2/01/02 at 15:59 (072206)

Hi Jane,

I think you have given it enough time to get better on it's own, I'd see a doc now. Do you have to go back to your GP, or can you go to a Sports Med doctor? I think that's the direction I'd go. Good luck

BCG

PS I really doubt any of us wanted to take time off to see a doctor that first time. Bite the bullet and do it!
If you can get the 1st appointment of the day, there will be less waiting and you can still get to work for most of the day.

Re: Me the snowboard instructor...again

Jane on 2/01/02 at 16:11 (072208)

Thanks for the quick response I think that I will pay a visit to my GP first thing on Monday morning. I was wondering if you or anyone else in here would have any ideas of how my Dr may treat this. I am just wondering what to expect. I am thinking that he may send me to another Dr, such as a OS. Just my thoughts though...

Re: Me the snowboard instructor...again

Ed Davis, DPM on 2/02/02 at 17:13 (072314)

If numbness exists in the toes and the pain in the ankle is at the tarsal tunnel then TTS may need to be looked at. The doc should percuss (tap) on the tarsal tunnel and look for a Tinel's sign (tingling that radiates toward the bottom of the feet or toes). If some of those things are found, a nerve conduction velocity test would be appropriate.
Ed

Re: why am I not surprised to see you here again? :-)

elliott on 2/02/02 at 23:00 (072372)

Sorry you have to be back, though. As Dr. Ed suggests, a logical next step is to get a nerve conduction test. You can do this either before or after you go to an OS, but chances are, if you go to the OS first, you'll still need it, so if you can, consider getting the nerve conduction test first. Not remembering all your details from the last time, discomfort at inner ankle and numb toes sounds like classic TTS. Hate missing a day of work? Hah! Your life could be ruined if this thing doesn't clear. So you may need to keep things in perspective. Take a little time and read past pages on this board for a sampler. Don't expect your primary to have much hands-on with this; they generally just don't know enough about it. Which docs you see for treatment is important. There are some non-surgical things (e.g. rest, orthotics, PT, change of ski boots and footwear, cortisone shots) which might work if the problem is dealt with early on. Can I ask where you live? Maybe someone here can recommend a doc near you.

----

Re: Newfoundland

Jane on 2/03/02 at 05:09 (072384)

Thanks for giving me some idea of what to expect. This message board is a wonderful thing! You asked where I live. I live in Newfoundland, Canada. I really don't expect anyone else to be from Newfoundland to be in here, but it's worth a shot. Once again, thanks. I will keep you posted.

Re: I had to ask :-)

elliott on 2/03/02 at 08:44 (072395)

Well, at least you can get ESWT on the cheap. :-) There's a few here from Canada; maybe they can help.

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Re: try this

elliott on 2/04/02 at 13:14 (072539)

I beleive some big TTS names in Canada are JT Lau and TR Daniels, at U of Toronto (and possibly also Wellesley Hospital), Ontario. Might be worth a visit, or at least a call to them to ask who they recommend in your area.

---

Re: Me the snowboard instructor...again

BrianG on 2/01/02 at 15:59 (072206)

Hi Jane,

I think you have given it enough time to get better on it's own, I'd see a doc now. Do you have to go back to your GP, or can you go to a Sports Med doctor? I think that's the direction I'd go. Good luck

BCG

PS I really doubt any of us wanted to take time off to see a doctor that first time. Bite the bullet and do it!
If you can get the 1st appointment of the day, there will be less waiting and you can still get to work for most of the day.

Re: Me the snowboard instructor...again

Jane on 2/01/02 at 16:11 (072208)

Thanks for the quick response I think that I will pay a visit to my GP first thing on Monday morning. I was wondering if you or anyone else in here would have any ideas of how my Dr may treat this. I am just wondering what to expect. I am thinking that he may send me to another Dr, such as a OS. Just my thoughts though...

Re: Me the snowboard instructor...again

Ed Davis, DPM on 2/02/02 at 17:13 (072314)

If numbness exists in the toes and the pain in the ankle is at the tarsal tunnel then TTS may need to be looked at. The doc should percuss (tap) on the tarsal tunnel and look for a Tinel's sign (tingling that radiates toward the bottom of the feet or toes). If some of those things are found, a nerve conduction velocity test would be appropriate.
Ed

Re: why am I not surprised to see you here again? :-)

elliott on 2/02/02 at 23:00 (072372)

Sorry you have to be back, though. As Dr. Ed suggests, a logical next step is to get a nerve conduction test. You can do this either before or after you go to an OS, but chances are, if you go to the OS first, you'll still need it, so if you can, consider getting the nerve conduction test first. Not remembering all your details from the last time, discomfort at inner ankle and numb toes sounds like classic TTS. Hate missing a day of work? Hah! Your life could be ruined if this thing doesn't clear. So you may need to keep things in perspective. Take a little time and read past pages on this board for a sampler. Don't expect your primary to have much hands-on with this; they generally just don't know enough about it. Which docs you see for treatment is important. There are some non-surgical things (e.g. rest, orthotics, PT, change of ski boots and footwear, cortisone shots) which might work if the problem is dealt with early on. Can I ask where you live? Maybe someone here can recommend a doc near you.

----

Re: Newfoundland

Jane on 2/03/02 at 05:09 (072384)

Thanks for giving me some idea of what to expect. This message board is a wonderful thing! You asked where I live. I live in Newfoundland, Canada. I really don't expect anyone else to be from Newfoundland to be in here, but it's worth a shot. Once again, thanks. I will keep you posted.

Re: I had to ask :-)

elliott on 2/03/02 at 08:44 (072395)

Well, at least you can get ESWT on the cheap. :-) There's a few here from Canada; maybe they can help.

---

Re: try this

elliott on 2/04/02 at 13:14 (072539)

I beleive some big TTS names in Canada are JT Lau and TR Daniels, at U of Toronto (and possibly also Wellesley Hospital), Ontario. Might be worth a visit, or at least a call to them to ask who they recommend in your area.

---