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Pains in leg ?

Posted by JoAnn Fl on 2/19/02 at 10:02 (074285)

Do you have pains running up or down your bad foot leg? It seems to be in the back of the thigh area. My PF is returning again, I had a short time of no pain, is this what I can expect?

Re: Pains in leg ?

Pam B on 2/19/02 at 10:10 (074290)

I am not a doc JoAnn but I do suffer from PF........I can tell you that all these body parts are attached and can and do cause problems all the way up to the lower lumbar region......I talked to my pod about this and he did confirm for me......when you walk wrong everything is affected.......I suggest you see a pod asap and ice and rest as much as possible......I think alot of people make a terrible mistake by not going to the pod right away.......good luck to you

Re: Pains in leg ?

BrianJ on 2/19/02 at 13:26 (074312)

JoAnn --

If you regularly have leg pain in addition to your foot pain, you may want to determine whether your problem stems from sciatica or lumbar stenosis. These conditions are probably less common than PF, but may be worth a look.

Re: Pains in leg ?

Carmen H on 2/19/02 at 17:09 (074334)

Your hamstring is attached to the gastrocnemius (calf) muscles which are attached to the achilles and to the Plantar Fascia etc etc....
If your hamstrings are tight (along the back of your thigh) this could affect your feet....thisis from expereince only I have the same problem.....well I did have it and I stretched my way to health.
I hope this helps!

Re: Pains in leg ?

Julie on 2/20/02 at 02:13 (074372)

JoAnn, the whole of the lower extremity, from the foot to the lower back, is one continuum, and an injury along any part of the continuum can have a knock-on effect on any other part or parts. The pain you're having along the back of your leg could originate from your lower back (compression of the sciatic nerve due to a prolapsed disc, for example). Or it could originate with your PF (possibly due to your having altered your gait to compensate for your heel pain).

You should certainly consult your doctor, or a chiropractor or osteopath, to determine the origin of the pain, so that whatever the cause, it can be tackled.

Re: Pains in leg ?

Pam B on 2/19/02 at 10:10 (074290)

I am not a doc JoAnn but I do suffer from PF........I can tell you that all these body parts are attached and can and do cause problems all the way up to the lower lumbar region......I talked to my pod about this and he did confirm for me......when you walk wrong everything is affected.......I suggest you see a pod asap and ice and rest as much as possible......I think alot of people make a terrible mistake by not going to the pod right away.......good luck to you

Re: Pains in leg ?

BrianJ on 2/19/02 at 13:26 (074312)

JoAnn --

If you regularly have leg pain in addition to your foot pain, you may want to determine whether your problem stems from sciatica or lumbar stenosis. These conditions are probably less common than PF, but may be worth a look.

Re: Pains in leg ?

Carmen H on 2/19/02 at 17:09 (074334)

Your hamstring is attached to the gastrocnemius (calf) muscles which are attached to the achilles and to the Plantar Fascia etc etc....
If your hamstrings are tight (along the back of your thigh) this could affect your feet....thisis from expereince only I have the same problem.....well I did have it and I stretched my way to health.
I hope this helps!

Re: Pains in leg ?

Julie on 2/20/02 at 02:13 (074372)

JoAnn, the whole of the lower extremity, from the foot to the lower back, is one continuum, and an injury along any part of the continuum can have a knock-on effect on any other part or parts. The pain you're having along the back of your leg could originate from your lower back (compression of the sciatic nerve due to a prolapsed disc, for example). Or it could originate with your PF (possibly due to your having altered your gait to compensate for your heel pain).

You should certainly consult your doctor, or a chiropractor or osteopath, to determine the origin of the pain, so that whatever the cause, it can be tackled.