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A Most Unusual Event

Posted by john h on 2/19/02 at 11:09 (074298)

Tomorrow at 20:02 (military time),as the clock ticks from 20:01 to 20:02 it will be 20:02 time, 20:02 date, 2002 year. This event happened only once before in eternity 10:01 time 10:01 date, 1001 year. Supposedly will never happen again in eternity.

Re: A Most Unusual Event

Suzanne D on 2/19/02 at 11:32 (074303)

Thanks, John! I think it might be interesting to talk about that in our calendar time tomorrow at school. We place the date on the calendar each day and also put up the digital date, the day of the week, the month and so forth.

On the 12th on Lincoln's birthday, it was our 112 day of school (We keep a tally of that, too.), and one of the children noted that. They enjoy seeing patterns.

Thanks for bringing that to our attention! :-)

Re: A Most Unusual Event

Stephanie S. on 2/19/02 at 11:38 (074305)

As always...'You Da Man'....;)

Re: A Most Unusual Event

nancy s. on 2/19/02 at 16:48 (074328)

well doesn't this call for some kind of celebration? john, you organize it.

Re: A Most Unusual Event - a Magic Year

Valerie S on 2/20/02 at 07:01 (074376)

Thanks John!

I wrote all my bills for February on the 2nd, just so I could write 02/02/02 on all my checks ! hee hee

Also 2002 is the same backwards and forwards, and UPSIDE-DOWN! Last time that happened was 1881, and next time won't be until 2112... so even though it's not the only time in eternity, it's a once in a lifetime year for most of us ... I think this is going to be a lucky year ... hopefully that means answers and relief for all the PF'ers here !

By the way, I knew I shouldn't have come on here boasting about how good I felt... I knew it, I knew it, I knew it... now have a light jump in pain again... aarrrgh... why can't it just GO AWAY like I keep telling it to ?? ha ha ha...

Have a good day everyone.

Val.

Re: A Most Unusual Event - a Magic Year

john h on 2/20/02 at 10:07 (074394)

Valerie: I must have made the same mistake 5 times or more boasting about how close I was to cure. I do not do that anymore. I now take the long view. 5 years ago my pain was probably between a 5-7 most of the time. Now my pain is between a 1-3 most of the time and has mostly been at a 1 so I know over the long haul I have made progress.

Re: A Most Unusual Event - a Magic Year

Julie on 2/20/02 at 11:28 (074402)

Yes, you should have come here boasting, Val - you gave us all a lift. Don't be cross with your feet now - look at these little 'relapses' as kindly reminders that they want to be loved and looked after. A couple of days cutting back a little will set you right.

It's very nice to have you back!

Re: Hey what about 2112 ?

Valerie S on 2/20/02 at 21:42 (074448)

Won't this happen again at 21:12 on 21:12 in 2112 ?

Just wondering...

Re: Hey what about 2112 ?

John h on 2/21/02 at 21:18 (074615)

On tv last night they said the time like this last occured about 1000 years ago and would not happen again for over 100 year or was it 700 years. I do not want to tax my brain at the moment. Remember we are talking military or zulu time or Greenwich Mean Time Valerie which is expressed in 0100 hours thru 2400hous

Re: Hey what about 2112 ?

Julie on 2/22/02 at 03:27 (074643)

Vals's quite right, John. It WILL happen again, in 110 years, at 21.12 (that's 12 minutes past 9 to you yanks) on 21.12 (December 21) 2112.

And I suppose the last time it happened was at 11.11 on 11.11. 1111. Or was it at 10.01 on 10.01 in 1001?

But I do think it's cheating for Americans to embrace the day/month/year order (which is so much more logical than the month/day/year order you generally use) only when there's a special date like Wednesday's to enjoy.

Re: Hey what about 2112 ?

Carole C in NOLA on 2/22/02 at 05:20 (074646)

Maybe the last time was not in 1111; How about 12:21 on 12.21.1221 ? :)

Carole C

Re: Cheating Americans... Julie !

Valerie S on 2/22/02 at 06:19 (074652)

Julie...

You know us too well. hee hee.

We refuse to be follow logic...

= :^)

Val.

Re: Cheating Americans... Val !

Julie on 2/22/02 at 08:26 (074672)

Hi. I'm one of you, remember? :o)

Re: Hey what about 2112 ?

john h on 2/22/02 at 12:31 (074691)

I am pretty much stuck with what a learned as a pilot and that all time is GMT time and month/day/year is the military way of expressing it. I still mess with my wifes head when I tell her i will be home at 2200 hours.

Re: Hey what about 2112 ?

john h on 2/22/02 at 12:34 (074693)

A good time website is http://tycho.usno.mil/what.html
it will give you atomic time in all zones,GMT,by voice,or many other way.

Re: Hey what about 2112 ?

john h on 2/22/02 at 12:37 (074695)

think i copied the URL wrong for time http://tycho.usno.navy.mil/what.html

Re: Cheating Americans... Julie !

Nancy N on 2/22/02 at 19:12 (074752)

Much as I adore the Brits, I must say that there are plenty of places where they don't follow the logic, either. I agree with Julie about the dates (I always write mine that way, and write out the month to avoid any confusion), but the Brits are still driving on the right-hand side of the road, and anyone who knows anything about music can tell you that some of their terms for musical notation make no sense at all... charming as they are :)

Re: Nancy

Julie on 2/23/02 at 01:37 (074781)

Well, sure, Nancy: I can't argue with you there. But I do hope you're practising driving on the wrong side of the road (metaphorically/mentally, I mean) because you're going to have to learn when you emigrate to these shores.

Actually, it's quite easy to shift: I never have any difficulty when I drive in Europe. But then I learned to drive in the States, so the 'left' side of the road still feels instinctively 'right' to me (if that makes sense).

I don't know much about British musical notation. Are you speaking of such little treasures as the hemidemisemiquavers?

Re: Nancy

Nancy N on 2/23/02 at 08:22 (074787)

Julie--

Don't forget, I lived in the UK for a while, so I would not have to learn to drive from scratch. The hardest part of the switch was remembering to stay on the correct side of the road--especially when making turns! But I got so used to it in 6 months that I nearly had a panic attack the first time someone drove me around when I got back here (I didn't have a car for a while), thinking we were going to get hit on the wrong side of the road!

As for musical terms, the hemidemisemiquavers are about the cream of the crop. I felt like I had to learn a whole new language when I started singing in the choirs over there. I had to ask someone to translate:
half note=minim
eighth note=quaver
whole note=semibreve, if I have it right... (because it is half the length of a 'breve,' which is a note nobody uses anymore anyway)
sixteenth note=semiquaver
thirty-second note=demisemiquaver
sixty-fourth note=the irrepressible hemidemisemiquaver (it takes about twenty times longer to say the word than it does to produce the note itself)

but the one that really makes no sense is that
quarter note=crotchet.

As my Belgian friend in Ireland pointed out, 'crotchet' comes from the French for 'hook,' which implies that it really should refer to the eighth note, which has a hook-like flag on its stem. But no, the Brits use it for the quarter note, which has no such markings. He said he had asked about the terms once and was told that it was because 'The British have to be different' and that was a good enough explanation for him.

Well, now that I've baffled you with musical terms, I think I should be quiet before you all decide I have no idea what the heck I'm talking about :)

Re: Nancy

Julie on 2/23/02 at 08:56 (074795)

But you do! It all comes back to me now. No wonder I never pursued the idea of singing in an English choir.

I think I like the crotchet the best.

The British don't think they have to be different, it's more that they think everybody else is different.

I'm sure you've heard the old saw headline: 'Fog in the Channel, Continent cut off'.

Yes, I remembered that you've lived over here and that you want to come back. You won't have any trouble with the illogical driving.You just have to remember to be awake to which side you're supposed to be driving on when you come out of a petrol station. Sorry - gas station.

Re: Julie

Nancy N on 2/23/02 at 17:42 (074857)

I think the crotchet is pretty amusing, myself, but nothing beats trying to say hemidemisemiquaver with a straight face!

Actually, I've always wondered about something else, too--why does a leading O seem to become a U in the UK? For instance, I was puzzled that 'Oil of Olay' is 'Oil of Ulay' in the UK. And I've heard Tony Blair talk about 'Usama bin Laden' as well. Any guess?

Re: O's and A's

wendyn on 2/23/02 at 18:40 (074864)

Maybe for the same reason that Americans say 'mam' instead of 'mom' and 'hat' instead of 'hot'?

Re: O's and A's

Nancy N on 2/23/02 at 19:19 (074869)

I think what you're describing is a more regional accent--I've met people from the midwest who pronounce 'pin' and 'pen' exactly the same way (I could never figure out why they would ask for a pin, when it turned out they wanted a pen). There are some seriously flat accents in the midwest--especially in the northern areas, like Minnesota and the Dakotas. But the situation I'm describing in the UK isn't just a pronunciation issue--it's a spelling difference as well. I was totally baffled when I was at the chemist in Ireland and saw bottles of Oil of Ulay. Kind of funny, actually. Didn't think much of it until I read something in a UK paper about Usama bin Laden, at which point it started to look like more than just a fluke.

Re: OH!

wendyn on 2/23/02 at 19:59 (074874)

I did not know that Nancy!

The accent I was referring to was the typical Chicago/midwest one that I am so familiar with.

Re: OH!

Nancy N on 2/23/02 at 20:03 (074876)

I had a feeling that was probably the accent you were used to hearing from our side of the border. There are a LOT of accents in the US--we'd keep Henry Higgins busy for a good long while. :)

Re: OH!

wendyn on 2/23/02 at 23:42 (074890)

I am familiar with most of the accents, but I really had no idea that the British had their own way of spelling - or that they have hemisemidemiquaver notes or whatever they were.

I like that word.

I must try to find ways to use it more often.

Re: Nancy re 'O' and 'U"

Julie on 2/24/02 at 03:30 (074896)

No idea. Except that in my (American) youth long long ago, when I used the lotion in question, it WAS spelled Oil of Ulay in the States.

I've heard our Tony pronounce Osama as Usama, but I've never seen it written that way.

So I think the O and U thing is a coincidence. Can you think of any other examples?

I am now going to find a mirror and try saying hemidemisemiquaver with a straight face.

Re: Nancy re Osama/Usama

Julie on 2/24/02 at 03:35 (074897)

Just another thought - remember that our spellings of Arabic words are transliterations of words from a different alphabet, based on the most accurate pronunciation we're able to manage. So 'Osama' nor 'Usama' are probably equally valid, though probably neither gets it absolutely right.

Re: Nancy re Osama/Usama

Julie on 2/24/02 at 03:38 (074898)

That was supposed to be Osama AND Usama, not NOR.

I started to say it a different way but didn't complete the editing.

I think I'll go and practise my crotchets now.

(Before you ask: in English - as opposed to American - 'practise' is the verb form, 'practice' is the noun. American has one word, practice, for both.)

Re: OH!

Nancy N on 2/24/02 at 06:14 (074899)

There are a lot of spelling discrepancies between the US and the UK. Things like color/colour, realize/realise, etc. I used to drive my high school teachers crazy using the British spellings--fortunately, one of them had spent a year teaching in Scotland and didn't try to force me to change, like his predecessor had. Which do you use in Canada?

Hemidemisemiquaver is a cool word, but it does seem ridiculous to use a word that long to describe a note that is so incredibly short. Let me know if you find ways to use it more often! :)

Re: Nancy re 'O' and 'U"

Nancy N on 2/24/02 at 06:16 (074900)

Hmmmm.... I did not know that it used to be Ulay here as well. That's interesting.

I can't think of any other examples, to be honest. I know I saw it written that way at least once, probably in an online UK paper, but I can't remember where now. It was several months ago.

I'm going to have to see if I can find anything even more amusing than hemidemisemiquaver for you guys, since you're enjoying it so much. I'll let you know what I find....

Re: Nancy re Osama/Usama

Nancy N on 2/24/02 at 06:18 (074901)

You're right about the transliteration from Arabic--that could be to blame. And I had never realized that the verb and noun of practice had different spellings there--I thought it was just 'practise.' Though I do recall seeing 'practice' a few times in places where it didn't seem to belong, and being confused. Thanks for clearing that up!

Re: Mom

Julie on 2/24/02 at 06:56 (074902)

Wendy, the English say 'Mum'. It's about half way between 'Mom' and 'Mam'.

Re: Nancy re practise/practice

Julie on 2/24/02 at 06:59 (074903)

No worries. It took me 30 years to figure that one out. For 20 of those years I had been practising yoga but thinking I was practicing. I was writing Office Yoga and had asked a friend to read it for me: she picked up on my indiscriminate use of the two forms and very concisely told me what they mean. So now I've passed that little gem on to you.

It's a useful distinction, actually.

Re: OH!

wendyn on 2/24/02 at 09:15 (074908)

On that hemidemisemiquaver (note), I will say that Canadians are always all mixed up.

Technically, we use British spelling, I practice - I don't practise - I colour, I have a good sense of humour not humor, I realize what I have done - I don't realise it.

However, because so much of what we read is American, we often don't know which spelling is right or why there is two ways to spell everything. For me, it wasn't until I started using a spell checker that I realized that there were American spellings and UK spellings... I couldn't figure out why the checker was trying to make me spell things wrong!

I also,

Can tell you I'm 116 pounds, but I don't really know how much an ounce is. I cannot tell you how many kilograms I am, but I do know how to figure it out. If you told me you were 87 kg, I would have no idea how big that is unless I converted it to pounds.

I do not understand Farenheit - if you say it's 50 F, I have to convert it to Celcius so that I know what that would feel like.

I say that I am 5 foot 2, but I don't know how big a yard is - or how many yards are in a mile, how many inches are in a yard. I cannot tell you how many centimetres tall I am.

I like to drive 100 km per hour, and I don't know how big a mile is.

I don't know how big a gallon is, but I buy 2 litre bottles of pop and 4 litre bottles of milk. I don't know how big a pint is or how many there are in a gallon.

So - most of us are stuck somewhere between metric and imperial measurements. I understand the metric system (it's simple) but I don't use it in my head for weight or for height. I use the imperial system for that, but I don't know how it works.

All mixed up!

Re: OH!

John h on 2/24/02 at 13:36 (074928)

Wendy I know an Imperial quart of gin is larger than a regular quart of gin.

Re: A Most Unusual Event

Suzanne D on 2/19/02 at 11:32 (074303)

Thanks, John! I think it might be interesting to talk about that in our calendar time tomorrow at school. We place the date on the calendar each day and also put up the digital date, the day of the week, the month and so forth.

On the 12th on Lincoln's birthday, it was our 112 day of school (We keep a tally of that, too.), and one of the children noted that. They enjoy seeing patterns.

Thanks for bringing that to our attention! :-)

Re: A Most Unusual Event

Stephanie S. on 2/19/02 at 11:38 (074305)

As always...'You Da Man'....;)

Re: A Most Unusual Event

nancy s. on 2/19/02 at 16:48 (074328)

well doesn't this call for some kind of celebration? john, you organize it.

Re: A Most Unusual Event - a Magic Year

Valerie S on 2/20/02 at 07:01 (074376)

Thanks John!

I wrote all my bills for February on the 2nd, just so I could write 02/02/02 on all my checks ! hee hee

Also 2002 is the same backwards and forwards, and UPSIDE-DOWN! Last time that happened was 1881, and next time won't be until 2112... so even though it's not the only time in eternity, it's a once in a lifetime year for most of us ... I think this is going to be a lucky year ... hopefully that means answers and relief for all the PF'ers here !

By the way, I knew I shouldn't have come on here boasting about how good I felt... I knew it, I knew it, I knew it... now have a light jump in pain again... aarrrgh... why can't it just GO AWAY like I keep telling it to ?? ha ha ha...

Have a good day everyone.

Val.

Re: A Most Unusual Event - a Magic Year

john h on 2/20/02 at 10:07 (074394)

Valerie: I must have made the same mistake 5 times or more boasting about how close I was to cure. I do not do that anymore. I now take the long view. 5 years ago my pain was probably between a 5-7 most of the time. Now my pain is between a 1-3 most of the time and has mostly been at a 1 so I know over the long haul I have made progress.

Re: A Most Unusual Event - a Magic Year

Julie on 2/20/02 at 11:28 (074402)

Yes, you should have come here boasting, Val - you gave us all a lift. Don't be cross with your feet now - look at these little 'relapses' as kindly reminders that they want to be loved and looked after. A couple of days cutting back a little will set you right.

It's very nice to have you back!

Re: Hey what about 2112 ?

Valerie S on 2/20/02 at 21:42 (074448)

Won't this happen again at 21:12 on 21:12 in 2112 ?

Just wondering...

Re: Hey what about 2112 ?

John h on 2/21/02 at 21:18 (074615)

On tv last night they said the time like this last occured about 1000 years ago and would not happen again for over 100 year or was it 700 years. I do not want to tax my brain at the moment. Remember we are talking military or zulu time or Greenwich Mean Time Valerie which is expressed in 0100 hours thru 2400hous

Re: Hey what about 2112 ?

Julie on 2/22/02 at 03:27 (074643)

Vals's quite right, John. It WILL happen again, in 110 years, at 21.12 (that's 12 minutes past 9 to you yanks) on 21.12 (December 21) 2112.

And I suppose the last time it happened was at 11.11 on 11.11. 1111. Or was it at 10.01 on 10.01 in 1001?

But I do think it's cheating for Americans to embrace the day/month/year order (which is so much more logical than the month/day/year order you generally use) only when there's a special date like Wednesday's to enjoy.

Re: Hey what about 2112 ?

Carole C in NOLA on 2/22/02 at 05:20 (074646)

Maybe the last time was not in 1111; How about 12:21 on 12.21.1221 ? :)

Carole C

Re: Cheating Americans... Julie !

Valerie S on 2/22/02 at 06:19 (074652)

Julie...

You know us too well. hee hee.

We refuse to be follow logic...

= :^)

Val.

Re: Cheating Americans... Val !

Julie on 2/22/02 at 08:26 (074672)

Hi. I'm one of you, remember? :o)

Re: Hey what about 2112 ?

john h on 2/22/02 at 12:31 (074691)

I am pretty much stuck with what a learned as a pilot and that all time is GMT time and month/day/year is the military way of expressing it. I still mess with my wifes head when I tell her i will be home at 2200 hours.

Re: Hey what about 2112 ?

john h on 2/22/02 at 12:34 (074693)

A good time website is http://tycho.usno.mil/what.html
it will give you atomic time in all zones,GMT,by voice,or many other way.

Re: Hey what about 2112 ?

john h on 2/22/02 at 12:37 (074695)

think i copied the URL wrong for time http://tycho.usno.navy.mil/what.html

Re: Cheating Americans... Julie !

Nancy N on 2/22/02 at 19:12 (074752)

Much as I adore the Brits, I must say that there are plenty of places where they don't follow the logic, either. I agree with Julie about the dates (I always write mine that way, and write out the month to avoid any confusion), but the Brits are still driving on the right-hand side of the road, and anyone who knows anything about music can tell you that some of their terms for musical notation make no sense at all... charming as they are :)

Re: Nancy

Julie on 2/23/02 at 01:37 (074781)

Well, sure, Nancy: I can't argue with you there. But I do hope you're practising driving on the wrong side of the road (metaphorically/mentally, I mean) because you're going to have to learn when you emigrate to these shores.

Actually, it's quite easy to shift: I never have any difficulty when I drive in Europe. But then I learned to drive in the States, so the 'left' side of the road still feels instinctively 'right' to me (if that makes sense).

I don't know much about British musical notation. Are you speaking of such little treasures as the hemidemisemiquavers?

Re: Nancy

Nancy N on 2/23/02 at 08:22 (074787)

Julie--

Don't forget, I lived in the UK for a while, so I would not have to learn to drive from scratch. The hardest part of the switch was remembering to stay on the correct side of the road--especially when making turns! But I got so used to it in 6 months that I nearly had a panic attack the first time someone drove me around when I got back here (I didn't have a car for a while), thinking we were going to get hit on the wrong side of the road!

As for musical terms, the hemidemisemiquavers are about the cream of the crop. I felt like I had to learn a whole new language when I started singing in the choirs over there. I had to ask someone to translate:
half note=minim
eighth note=quaver
whole note=semibreve, if I have it right... (because it is half the length of a 'breve,' which is a note nobody uses anymore anyway)
sixteenth note=semiquaver
thirty-second note=demisemiquaver
sixty-fourth note=the irrepressible hemidemisemiquaver (it takes about twenty times longer to say the word than it does to produce the note itself)

but the one that really makes no sense is that
quarter note=crotchet.

As my Belgian friend in Ireland pointed out, 'crotchet' comes from the French for 'hook,' which implies that it really should refer to the eighth note, which has a hook-like flag on its stem. But no, the Brits use it for the quarter note, which has no such markings. He said he had asked about the terms once and was told that it was because 'The British have to be different' and that was a good enough explanation for him.

Well, now that I've baffled you with musical terms, I think I should be quiet before you all decide I have no idea what the heck I'm talking about :)

Re: Nancy

Julie on 2/23/02 at 08:56 (074795)

But you do! It all comes back to me now. No wonder I never pursued the idea of singing in an English choir.

I think I like the crotchet the best.

The British don't think they have to be different, it's more that they think everybody else is different.

I'm sure you've heard the old saw headline: 'Fog in the Channel, Continent cut off'.

Yes, I remembered that you've lived over here and that you want to come back. You won't have any trouble with the illogical driving.You just have to remember to be awake to which side you're supposed to be driving on when you come out of a petrol station. Sorry - gas station.

Re: Julie

Nancy N on 2/23/02 at 17:42 (074857)

I think the crotchet is pretty amusing, myself, but nothing beats trying to say hemidemisemiquaver with a straight face!

Actually, I've always wondered about something else, too--why does a leading O seem to become a U in the UK? For instance, I was puzzled that 'Oil of Olay' is 'Oil of Ulay' in the UK. And I've heard Tony Blair talk about 'Usama bin Laden' as well. Any guess?

Re: O's and A's

wendyn on 2/23/02 at 18:40 (074864)

Maybe for the same reason that Americans say 'mam' instead of 'mom' and 'hat' instead of 'hot'?

Re: O's and A's

Nancy N on 2/23/02 at 19:19 (074869)

I think what you're describing is a more regional accent--I've met people from the midwest who pronounce 'pin' and 'pen' exactly the same way (I could never figure out why they would ask for a pin, when it turned out they wanted a pen). There are some seriously flat accents in the midwest--especially in the northern areas, like Minnesota and the Dakotas. But the situation I'm describing in the UK isn't just a pronunciation issue--it's a spelling difference as well. I was totally baffled when I was at the chemist in Ireland and saw bottles of Oil of Ulay. Kind of funny, actually. Didn't think much of it until I read something in a UK paper about Usama bin Laden, at which point it started to look like more than just a fluke.

Re: OH!

wendyn on 2/23/02 at 19:59 (074874)

I did not know that Nancy!

The accent I was referring to was the typical Chicago/midwest one that I am so familiar with.

Re: OH!

Nancy N on 2/23/02 at 20:03 (074876)

I had a feeling that was probably the accent you were used to hearing from our side of the border. There are a LOT of accents in the US--we'd keep Henry Higgins busy for a good long while. :)

Re: OH!

wendyn on 2/23/02 at 23:42 (074890)

I am familiar with most of the accents, but I really had no idea that the British had their own way of spelling - or that they have hemisemidemiquaver notes or whatever they were.

I like that word.

I must try to find ways to use it more often.

Re: Nancy re 'O' and 'U"

Julie on 2/24/02 at 03:30 (074896)

No idea. Except that in my (American) youth long long ago, when I used the lotion in question, it WAS spelled Oil of Ulay in the States.

I've heard our Tony pronounce Osama as Usama, but I've never seen it written that way.

So I think the O and U thing is a coincidence. Can you think of any other examples?

I am now going to find a mirror and try saying hemidemisemiquaver with a straight face.

Re: Nancy re Osama/Usama

Julie on 2/24/02 at 03:35 (074897)

Just another thought - remember that our spellings of Arabic words are transliterations of words from a different alphabet, based on the most accurate pronunciation we're able to manage. So 'Osama' nor 'Usama' are probably equally valid, though probably neither gets it absolutely right.

Re: Nancy re Osama/Usama

Julie on 2/24/02 at 03:38 (074898)

That was supposed to be Osama AND Usama, not NOR.

I started to say it a different way but didn't complete the editing.

I think I'll go and practise my crotchets now.

(Before you ask: in English - as opposed to American - 'practise' is the verb form, 'practice' is the noun. American has one word, practice, for both.)

Re: OH!

Nancy N on 2/24/02 at 06:14 (074899)

There are a lot of spelling discrepancies between the US and the UK. Things like color/colour, realize/realise, etc. I used to drive my high school teachers crazy using the British spellings--fortunately, one of them had spent a year teaching in Scotland and didn't try to force me to change, like his predecessor had. Which do you use in Canada?

Hemidemisemiquaver is a cool word, but it does seem ridiculous to use a word that long to describe a note that is so incredibly short. Let me know if you find ways to use it more often! :)

Re: Nancy re 'O' and 'U"

Nancy N on 2/24/02 at 06:16 (074900)

Hmmmm.... I did not know that it used to be Ulay here as well. That's interesting.

I can't think of any other examples, to be honest. I know I saw it written that way at least once, probably in an online UK paper, but I can't remember where now. It was several months ago.

I'm going to have to see if I can find anything even more amusing than hemidemisemiquaver for you guys, since you're enjoying it so much. I'll let you know what I find....

Re: Nancy re Osama/Usama

Nancy N on 2/24/02 at 06:18 (074901)

You're right about the transliteration from Arabic--that could be to blame. And I had never realized that the verb and noun of practice had different spellings there--I thought it was just 'practise.' Though I do recall seeing 'practice' a few times in places where it didn't seem to belong, and being confused. Thanks for clearing that up!

Re: Mom

Julie on 2/24/02 at 06:56 (074902)

Wendy, the English say 'Mum'. It's about half way between 'Mom' and 'Mam'.

Re: Nancy re practise/practice

Julie on 2/24/02 at 06:59 (074903)

No worries. It took me 30 years to figure that one out. For 20 of those years I had been practising yoga but thinking I was practicing. I was writing Office Yoga and had asked a friend to read it for me: she picked up on my indiscriminate use of the two forms and very concisely told me what they mean. So now I've passed that little gem on to you.

It's a useful distinction, actually.

Re: OH!

wendyn on 2/24/02 at 09:15 (074908)

On that hemidemisemiquaver (note), I will say that Canadians are always all mixed up.

Technically, we use British spelling, I practice - I don't practise - I colour, I have a good sense of humour not humor, I realize what I have done - I don't realise it.

However, because so much of what we read is American, we often don't know which spelling is right or why there is two ways to spell everything. For me, it wasn't until I started using a spell checker that I realized that there were American spellings and UK spellings... I couldn't figure out why the checker was trying to make me spell things wrong!

I also,

Can tell you I'm 116 pounds, but I don't really know how much an ounce is. I cannot tell you how many kilograms I am, but I do know how to figure it out. If you told me you were 87 kg, I would have no idea how big that is unless I converted it to pounds.

I do not understand Farenheit - if you say it's 50 F, I have to convert it to Celcius so that I know what that would feel like.

I say that I am 5 foot 2, but I don't know how big a yard is - or how many yards are in a mile, how many inches are in a yard. I cannot tell you how many centimetres tall I am.

I like to drive 100 km per hour, and I don't know how big a mile is.

I don't know how big a gallon is, but I buy 2 litre bottles of pop and 4 litre bottles of milk. I don't know how big a pint is or how many there are in a gallon.

So - most of us are stuck somewhere between metric and imperial measurements. I understand the metric system (it's simple) but I don't use it in my head for weight or for height. I use the imperial system for that, but I don't know how it works.

All mixed up!

Re: OH!

John h on 2/24/02 at 13:36 (074928)

Wendy I know an Imperial quart of gin is larger than a regular quart of gin.