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What a Day!

Posted by rich on 2/21/02 at 16:49 (074560)

Just had to share the joys of relapse with someone!

As if PF in one foot is not enough, I have developed it in the other and worse than before. Been self treating and no luck. Finally went to Pod again and we opted for cortizone shot right away. Hated to do it, but the pain was really intense. Lasted exactly three days and back to square one. Those were the first three days in eight months that I was practically pain free!

I was so cautious not to over do it, hoping the injection would be the ticket. Not so! Back in therapy, second visit was just today. I enjoyed nice warm parrafin wraps with the first foot, but now we are doing ice therapy. I've been using a frozen water bottle and ice packs at home, but this was a surprise. Imagine your heel being slowly rubbed and consequently frozen for twenty minutes. The defrost stage feels like pin pricks! Does help the pain for awhile longer than just an ice pack though. They use styro cups and peel off the top section once frozen so you have a 'handle' that doesn't freeze your fingers. Thinking of trying at home too.

To make things worse, my three year old had to go to the doctor yesterday (the flue!) and today, my sister-in-law went into labor! Not a chance that I could stay off my feet. Sooooo, just sitting here finally, enjoying all your posts and taking a well deserved break!

Hope the rest of you are having a good day! The sun will shine again tomorrow! LOL

Rich

Re: Sorry

Tammie on 2/21/02 at 18:17 (074579)

I am sorry to hear your painful news! Keep the chin up tho as you said the sun will shine again tomorrow! Hope your little one soon feels better! My pt used ice like that also, only It for some reason never felt good it always made it hurt worse and like start a chain of pain. For some odd reason I seem to like heat my feet feel so veryyyyyyyyyy cold.Then other times I have hot flash in them and I want to cool them , but then they hurt more. Feet they sure have there own minds sometimes! Have a better day tomorrow and hope all is back on the mend!

Re: What a Day!

Suzanne D on 2/21/02 at 18:39 (074587)

Sorry for your relapse and for the pain in both feet. My PF started in just my left foot, but in about 2 months it was in both. I understand how that makes you feel.

I also remember when my children were small and had the flu and many other illnesses. That was always so disturbing. The only good thing about children being ill is that they usually 'bounce back' fairly quickly! I hope this is the case with your child.

Here's hoping the sun will shine brightly for you tomorrow!

:-)Suzanne

Re: Sorry

Pam B on 2/21/02 at 18:39 (074589)

Sorry you are hurting.....I know how this goes.....it is bad enough to have it in one foot but both is the pits.....I had a anelgesic injected into my other foot the other nite when they removed the stitches from my surgery, and it is done working already.......oh well, better days ahead is what I keep telling me :)

Re: What a Day!

john h on 2/22/02 at 12:01 (074685)

Rich: one thing the shot did for you was help you narrow your focus of where your problem might be. You can now rule out the back. probably TTS and some other foot problems. Your doctor must have found the spot which is sometimes one of the factors in having a succesful ESWT treatment.

Re: PF in both feet

john h on 2/22/02 at 12:07 (074686)

To this day and after 7 years I still do not have a good explanation of why many people including me develop PF in both feet. Statistics would seem to be against developing a repetative motion injury in the other foot a few months after developing it in one foot. After the first foot develops PF you obviouly are slowed down if not totally stopped. I read that one injury makes us walk different on the other foot but that answer just does not get it for me. There is some common denominator here and if one knew what it was there might be a breakthrouhg in the treatment of PF>

Re: Sorry

Tammie on 2/21/02 at 18:17 (074579)

I am sorry to hear your painful news! Keep the chin up tho as you said the sun will shine again tomorrow! Hope your little one soon feels better! My pt used ice like that also, only It for some reason never felt good it always made it hurt worse and like start a chain of pain. For some odd reason I seem to like heat my feet feel so veryyyyyyyyyy cold.Then other times I have hot flash in them and I want to cool them , but then they hurt more. Feet they sure have there own minds sometimes! Have a better day tomorrow and hope all is back on the mend!

Re: What a Day!

Suzanne D on 2/21/02 at 18:39 (074587)

Sorry for your relapse and for the pain in both feet. My PF started in just my left foot, but in about 2 months it was in both. I understand how that makes you feel.

I also remember when my children were small and had the flu and many other illnesses. That was always so disturbing. The only good thing about children being ill is that they usually 'bounce back' fairly quickly! I hope this is the case with your child.

Here's hoping the sun will shine brightly for you tomorrow!

:-)Suzanne

Re: Sorry

Pam B on 2/21/02 at 18:39 (074589)

Sorry you are hurting.....I know how this goes.....it is bad enough to have it in one foot but both is the pits.....I had a anelgesic injected into my other foot the other nite when they removed the stitches from my surgery, and it is done working already.......oh well, better days ahead is what I keep telling me :)

Re: What a Day!

john h on 2/22/02 at 12:01 (074685)

Rich: one thing the shot did for you was help you narrow your focus of where your problem might be. You can now rule out the back. probably TTS and some other foot problems. Your doctor must have found the spot which is sometimes one of the factors in having a succesful ESWT treatment.

Re: PF in both feet

john h on 2/22/02 at 12:07 (074686)

To this day and after 7 years I still do not have a good explanation of why many people including me develop PF in both feet. Statistics would seem to be against developing a repetative motion injury in the other foot a few months after developing it in one foot. After the first foot develops PF you obviouly are slowed down if not totally stopped. I read that one injury makes us walk different on the other foot but that answer just does not get it for me. There is some common denominator here and if one knew what it was there might be a breakthrouhg in the treatment of PF>