Home The Book Dr Articles Products Message Boards Journal Articles Search Our Surveys Surgery ESWT Dr Messages Find Good Drs video

Can I still do yoga?

Posted by Kim C. on 3/20/02 at 10:59 (076976)

I've had pf for a few months now & am doing stretches regularly, have changed my cardio to the stationary bike to take pressure off my heels, & paid a whack of money for new shoes.

I know that I'm supposed to wear shoes at all times. I've also read that yoga can be helpful for pf - but yoga classes require you to remove your shoes. When I do yoga at home, I wear my running shoes, which isn't ideal; but I also feel strain in my arches while doing standing poses & am not sure if it's good strain - i.e. a good stretch - or bad strain. Any advice?

Thanks!

Re: Can I still do yoga?

Julie on 3/20/02 at 15:50 (077007)

Kim, I hope I can help you. I have been teaching yoga for 15 years (barefoot, of course). When I got PF two years ago I began wearing Birkenstocks to teach, and explained to my students why I had to. The first time I told them about PF, a student piped up 'That's what I'VE got too!' I instructed her to bring her trainers and always to wear them when we did standing poses. Since then I've had other students with PF, and have instructed them likewise. My PF is better now, but I still wear my Birks when teaching standing poses.

I think you've got the point? Of course it's better to practise yoga without shoes. But there is no law that says you are required to. Explain to your teacher what your problem is, and if she or he isn't sympathetic to your wearing shoes in class, find another teacher.

Not all yoga can be helpful to PF. I'd say that styles of yoga that focus primarily on standing poses are definitely NOT helpful, and I'd advise you to limit your practice of standing poses as much as possible until you're better. If you're studying one of these styles of yoga (e.g. Iyengar, Ashtanga) it might be better to switch to a gentler class for now.

The bottom line is: anything that feels like a strain, is a strain, not a 'good stretch'. Anything that hurts is re-injuring the fascia. So do wear supportive shoes all the time.

You may also find taping helpful: it 'rests' the fascia by supplying the support to the arch the fascia can no longer give, so it contributes to healing as well as relieving pain. See the instructions in the heel pain book - which I hope you've read and digested by now.

Please let me know if I can be of any more help.

Re: Can I still do yoga?

Sandy H. on 3/21/02 at 07:44 (077081)

I just hurt mine doing a standing twisting yoga stretch. I always wear shoes and the teacher doesn't mind. I may just attend the lying half of the class next time. Such a limited life....

Re: Can I still do yoga?

Julie on 3/21/02 at 08:14 (077083)

Sandy, there's no reason why you should have to make an exit when the standing poses start.

Ask the teacher for suitable modifications of the postures. Better still, do them, but follow the dictates of your own body, and modify them so that you don't hurt yourself.

It wouldn't be fair to the other students, or the teacher, to leave the room (or come into it, depending on which half of the lesson is the 'lying' half) in the middle of the lesson.

Re: Can I still do yoga?

Julie on 3/20/02 at 15:50 (077007)

Kim, I hope I can help you. I have been teaching yoga for 15 years (barefoot, of course). When I got PF two years ago I began wearing Birkenstocks to teach, and explained to my students why I had to. The first time I told them about PF, a student piped up 'That's what I'VE got too!' I instructed her to bring her trainers and always to wear them when we did standing poses. Since then I've had other students with PF, and have instructed them likewise. My PF is better now, but I still wear my Birks when teaching standing poses.

I think you've got the point? Of course it's better to practise yoga without shoes. But there is no law that says you are required to. Explain to your teacher what your problem is, and if she or he isn't sympathetic to your wearing shoes in class, find another teacher.

Not all yoga can be helpful to PF. I'd say that styles of yoga that focus primarily on standing poses are definitely NOT helpful, and I'd advise you to limit your practice of standing poses as much as possible until you're better. If you're studying one of these styles of yoga (e.g. Iyengar, Ashtanga) it might be better to switch to a gentler class for now.

The bottom line is: anything that feels like a strain, is a strain, not a 'good stretch'. Anything that hurts is re-injuring the fascia. So do wear supportive shoes all the time.

You may also find taping helpful: it 'rests' the fascia by supplying the support to the arch the fascia can no longer give, so it contributes to healing as well as relieving pain. See the instructions in the heel pain book - which I hope you've read and digested by now.

Please let me know if I can be of any more help.

Re: Can I still do yoga?

Sandy H. on 3/21/02 at 07:44 (077081)

I just hurt mine doing a standing twisting yoga stretch. I always wear shoes and the teacher doesn't mind. I may just attend the lying half of the class next time. Such a limited life....

Re: Can I still do yoga?

Julie on 3/21/02 at 08:14 (077083)

Sandy, there's no reason why you should have to make an exit when the standing poses start.

Ask the teacher for suitable modifications of the postures. Better still, do them, but follow the dictates of your own body, and modify them so that you don't hurt yourself.

It wouldn't be fair to the other students, or the teacher, to leave the room (or come into it, depending on which half of the lesson is the 'lying' half) in the middle of the lesson.