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What happens during PT?

Posted by Mahatmelissama on 4/02/02 at 17:27 (078278)

I am got an Rx for Physical Therapy and also I am getting custom orthodics done by a pod (I have some semi-rigid ones done by a foot store with a computer scanner but the pod I am going to says theirs may help me more)

Can anyone tell me what to expect or what goes on in PT? Does it hurt?

I am going 2x a week for 3 weeks.

Re: What happens during PT?

Dr. Zuckerman on 4/02/02 at 20:30 (078300)

You should receive an evaluation and treatment plan with all goals discussed with you. There will probaby be a stretching program, whirlpool, ultrasound , muscle stimuation. These are the basic treatments offered

Re: What happens during PT?

sandy h on 4/02/02 at 22:28 (078308)

If your PF is bad tell them that you want to avoid all weight bearing exercises in favor of ones using a theraband or at least something modified so that you aren't putting your whole weight on the injured part. My PT was treating me for ankle trouble and I'm sure all their exercises helped make my PF worse.

Re: What happens during PT?

Rich on 4/03/02 at 08:09 (078323)

PT can be very beneficial or not helpful, but it feels good regardless. For my left foot, my PT visits started with a parafin wrap, then iontophoresis followed by ultrasound and massage therapy. After a few visits we tried deep tissue massage to break up scar tissue. At the end of my PT sessions I felt better but not completely pain free so I did try the cortizone shot. I was hesitant, but we were leaving for vacation in Mexico and I didn't want to take a chance. It helped and my pain reduced to about a 1-2 where it still is today. This was last Sept/Oct.

My right foot starting hurting in Dec (probable from the vacation) and I started PT in Feb. but this time I opted for the shot first (lasted three days! and no relief). No parafin wraps this time! I had all the other stuff followed by ice massage...direct ice! Freezing cold! That's when I discovered that their method worked better than ice packs or frozen water bottles that I used at home. They used styro cups filled with water. Just peel down as you use. Gives an edge that can reach certain points better.

Sorry to add that the PT did not help my right foot. I am now in a cam walker and went in yesterday for an MRI. It's been four weeks in the boot and no change.

I don't regret the PT at all....they have wonderful stretching advice and the massage therapy did relieve my stress if not my foot pain! Ask lots of questions and if you are not comfortable with your PT, ask for another! They don't all do the same treatments.

Good Luck...I hope this answered your questions. Some of the procedures last at least twenty minutes or so, I always brought a book to enjoy! Once, they even turned out the lights and I took a quick nap!

Rich

Re: Thx for the advice

Mahatmelissama on 4/03/02 at 11:42 (078351)

I read your posts. Thanks. It is nice to know I should not brace myself for MORE PAIN (hopefully)!

Rich, I am sorry to hear it got worse. I will definitly pray for you. The shots SCARE ME...my pod brings them up but i give her such a look of FEAR that she does not push them...YET. I can't see going through that much pain for something temporary.

Re: Thx for the advice

Ed Davis, DPM on 4/03/02 at 22:05 (078437)

The shots can be given in a way that is only minimally uncomfortable -- depends on the technique of the doc.

Some of the effects of the shots can be temporary but some can be long lasting...breaking the cycle of pain and decreasing fibrosis in the area.
Ed

Re: What happens during PT?

Nancy N on 4/04/02 at 18:23 (078518)

I would take issue with your statement that 'it feels good regardless.' I went for PT for several months and it very definitely did NOT feel good. I put up with the pain, thinking that PT is not supposed to feel good and that maybe the pain was a sign that something was happening. I could not have been more wrong.

My PT had me doing calf raises (with weights, as time wore on), weight-bearing stretches, and did massage that absolutely hurt like hell. I liked him a lot, I don't think he was out to get me, but I also suspect that he gave me some of these things to do because I never complained. He would ask me, after I iced my feet at the end of the session, if I felt better, and the only reason I could say 'Yes' was because the effects of the ice had not worn off yet. I usually limped back to the locker room and for the rest of the day. I hadn't found this site yet, so I had no idea that this outcome was not the norm.

I'm not telling you this to scare you--but I am telling you this so that you know from the get-go that if something hurts, you need to TELL THEM!!! If it feels like you're doing something that's pulling on the injury, TELL THEM! (I did tell mine, and they didn't seem concerned, but I didn't know then what I know now, and if I had, I would have insisted that I not do the stretches they prescribed).

I think everyone else here has said that they've usually felt better after their PT sessions, so hopefully your experience will be more like theirs than mine was. But do be careful, and if something doesn't seem right to you, or seems like too much for you to do, speak up. They won't know if you don't say anything, so you are your own best advocate! Good luck!

Re: What happens during PT?

Rich on 4/04/02 at 22:05 (078543)

I was blessed to have a very good PT. He did do some very deep massage that was painful. He was trying to break up the scar tissue. He explained ahead of time what it might do...like bruising, but he never went too deep and never further than I was willing to try. The goal was to reinjure the area to prompt the body to heal itself in that area. I agree with voicing your concerns and taking an active part in your therapy. If you don't like something, you must speak up! Thanks for the reply...

Re: What happens during PT?

john h on 4/05/02 at 11:26 (078586)

Nancy: I had PT for achilles tendonitis and on a pain scale of 1-10 I put it at a 9. It really really hurt but did cure my tendonitis. Watching people in the PT clinic go through PT after knee surgery was not a pretty sight as they were yelling at the same time I was yelling about my achilles tendon. I think they must use the slogan 'no pain no gain'!

Re: Thx for the advice

Mahatmelissama on 4/05/02 at 16:55 (078603)

What can the doc do to make them bearable? I will only allow it if the doc numbs the area first.

Re: What happens during PT?

Nancy N on 4/05/02 at 20:12 (078626)

John--

My understanding at the time was that PT had to hurt in order to accomplish anything, which is why I never questioned it. But now that I know more about PF, I am quite certain that PT certainly didn't help me, and possibly made it worse. Especially the weight-bearing stretches (the massage might have been OK without those stretches, where I could feel the agony in my foot as I did them, but was told to continue). I'm not saying anyone should expect a completely comfy experience, but if something seems to be out of line pain-wise, I think it's wise to question it. I sure wish I had.

Re: What happens during PT?

John h on 4/06/02 at 13:13 (078686)

Nancy: Once I went to a reflexologist. At that time I was not doing bad and at a pain level of one. I thought this just might put me over the top and be cured. She had me hold up a finger accoring to my pain level as she massaged the foot very vigorously. The more pain the more she said it was helping. She had me in agony at a pain level of 9. This went on for 30 minutes. You bet it made my feet much worse. It took me 3 months to recovery from that ordeal. Pure torture! She must have hated men!!!!!!!

Re: What happens during PT?

Nancy N on 4/06/02 at 16:35 (078711)

Ouch, that does sound painful. But you know, John, she might have just been clueless, and not had anything against men (or you in particular)!

Re: Thx for the advice

Ed Davis, DPM on 4/08/02 at 20:30 (078868)

There are a lot of things that determine the amount of pain caused by an injection: Size of the needle used, speed at which the fluid in the syringe is being injected, site of the injection, viscosity of the injectable fluid. The doctor has control over the above factors. The area of the injection can be numbed first.
Ed

Re: Thx for the advice

john h on 4/09/02 at 09:26 (078909)

Dr. Ed: Having had 3 injections over the past 5 years how right you are. Two were just mildly painful and one was considerably more painful. I have found that taking a very very deep breath and exhaling slowly helped a lot. One of the girls on the board reminded me that was the way you give birth! I wonder if the area is more inflamed on a particular day if that would not increase the pain?

Re: Thx for the advice

Janew on 4/18/02 at 01:06 (080083)

Compared to the pain in my feet the shots hurt for just a few seconds. Don't let them give you mutliple shots all over your feet. A GP did that to my partner and it was horrible. A good DPM (pod) knows what to do and you shouldn't have a problem. I've had four shots in my left feet and three in the right. They've helped for awhile but I'm still working on the long term solution.

Re: What happens during PT?

Dr. Zuckerman on 4/02/02 at 20:30 (078300)

You should receive an evaluation and treatment plan with all goals discussed with you. There will probaby be a stretching program, whirlpool, ultrasound , muscle stimuation. These are the basic treatments offered

Re: What happens during PT?

sandy h on 4/02/02 at 22:28 (078308)

If your PF is bad tell them that you want to avoid all weight bearing exercises in favor of ones using a theraband or at least something modified so that you aren't putting your whole weight on the injured part. My PT was treating me for ankle trouble and I'm sure all their exercises helped make my PF worse.

Re: What happens during PT?

Rich on 4/03/02 at 08:09 (078323)

PT can be very beneficial or not helpful, but it feels good regardless. For my left foot, my PT visits started with a parafin wrap, then iontophoresis followed by ultrasound and massage therapy. After a few visits we tried deep tissue massage to break up scar tissue. At the end of my PT sessions I felt better but not completely pain free so I did try the cortizone shot. I was hesitant, but we were leaving for vacation in Mexico and I didn't want to take a chance. It helped and my pain reduced to about a 1-2 where it still is today. This was last Sept/Oct.

My right foot starting hurting in Dec (probable from the vacation) and I started PT in Feb. but this time I opted for the shot first (lasted three days! and no relief). No parafin wraps this time! I had all the other stuff followed by ice massage...direct ice! Freezing cold! That's when I discovered that their method worked better than ice packs or frozen water bottles that I used at home. They used styro cups filled with water. Just peel down as you use. Gives an edge that can reach certain points better.

Sorry to add that the PT did not help my right foot. I am now in a cam walker and went in yesterday for an MRI. It's been four weeks in the boot and no change.

I don't regret the PT at all....they have wonderful stretching advice and the massage therapy did relieve my stress if not my foot pain! Ask lots of questions and if you are not comfortable with your PT, ask for another! They don't all do the same treatments.

Good Luck...I hope this answered your questions. Some of the procedures last at least twenty minutes or so, I always brought a book to enjoy! Once, they even turned out the lights and I took a quick nap!

Rich

Re: Thx for the advice

Mahatmelissama on 4/03/02 at 11:42 (078351)

I read your posts. Thanks. It is nice to know I should not brace myself for MORE PAIN (hopefully)!

Rich, I am sorry to hear it got worse. I will definitly pray for you. The shots SCARE ME...my pod brings them up but i give her such a look of FEAR that she does not push them...YET. I can't see going through that much pain for something temporary.

Re: Thx for the advice

Ed Davis, DPM on 4/03/02 at 22:05 (078437)

The shots can be given in a way that is only minimally uncomfortable -- depends on the technique of the doc.

Some of the effects of the shots can be temporary but some can be long lasting...breaking the cycle of pain and decreasing fibrosis in the area.
Ed

Re: What happens during PT?

Nancy N on 4/04/02 at 18:23 (078518)

I would take issue with your statement that 'it feels good regardless.' I went for PT for several months and it very definitely did NOT feel good. I put up with the pain, thinking that PT is not supposed to feel good and that maybe the pain was a sign that something was happening. I could not have been more wrong.

My PT had me doing calf raises (with weights, as time wore on), weight-bearing stretches, and did massage that absolutely hurt like hell. I liked him a lot, I don't think he was out to get me, but I also suspect that he gave me some of these things to do because I never complained. He would ask me, after I iced my feet at the end of the session, if I felt better, and the only reason I could say 'Yes' was because the effects of the ice had not worn off yet. I usually limped back to the locker room and for the rest of the day. I hadn't found this site yet, so I had no idea that this outcome was not the norm.

I'm not telling you this to scare you--but I am telling you this so that you know from the get-go that if something hurts, you need to TELL THEM!!! If it feels like you're doing something that's pulling on the injury, TELL THEM! (I did tell mine, and they didn't seem concerned, but I didn't know then what I know now, and if I had, I would have insisted that I not do the stretches they prescribed).

I think everyone else here has said that they've usually felt better after their PT sessions, so hopefully your experience will be more like theirs than mine was. But do be careful, and if something doesn't seem right to you, or seems like too much for you to do, speak up. They won't know if you don't say anything, so you are your own best advocate! Good luck!

Re: What happens during PT?

Rich on 4/04/02 at 22:05 (078543)

I was blessed to have a very good PT. He did do some very deep massage that was painful. He was trying to break up the scar tissue. He explained ahead of time what it might do...like bruising, but he never went too deep and never further than I was willing to try. The goal was to reinjure the area to prompt the body to heal itself in that area. I agree with voicing your concerns and taking an active part in your therapy. If you don't like something, you must speak up! Thanks for the reply...

Re: What happens during PT?

john h on 4/05/02 at 11:26 (078586)

Nancy: I had PT for achilles tendonitis and on a pain scale of 1-10 I put it at a 9. It really really hurt but did cure my tendonitis. Watching people in the PT clinic go through PT after knee surgery was not a pretty sight as they were yelling at the same time I was yelling about my achilles tendon. I think they must use the slogan 'no pain no gain'!

Re: Thx for the advice

Mahatmelissama on 4/05/02 at 16:55 (078603)

What can the doc do to make them bearable? I will only allow it if the doc numbs the area first.

Re: What happens during PT?

Nancy N on 4/05/02 at 20:12 (078626)

John--

My understanding at the time was that PT had to hurt in order to accomplish anything, which is why I never questioned it. But now that I know more about PF, I am quite certain that PT certainly didn't help me, and possibly made it worse. Especially the weight-bearing stretches (the massage might have been OK without those stretches, where I could feel the agony in my foot as I did them, but was told to continue). I'm not saying anyone should expect a completely comfy experience, but if something seems to be out of line pain-wise, I think it's wise to question it. I sure wish I had.

Re: What happens during PT?

John h on 4/06/02 at 13:13 (078686)

Nancy: Once I went to a reflexologist. At that time I was not doing bad and at a pain level of one. I thought this just might put me over the top and be cured. She had me hold up a finger accoring to my pain level as she massaged the foot very vigorously. The more pain the more she said it was helping. She had me in agony at a pain level of 9. This went on for 30 minutes. You bet it made my feet much worse. It took me 3 months to recovery from that ordeal. Pure torture! She must have hated men!!!!!!!

Re: What happens during PT?

Nancy N on 4/06/02 at 16:35 (078711)

Ouch, that does sound painful. But you know, John, she might have just been clueless, and not had anything against men (or you in particular)!

Re: Thx for the advice

Ed Davis, DPM on 4/08/02 at 20:30 (078868)

There are a lot of things that determine the amount of pain caused by an injection: Size of the needle used, speed at which the fluid in the syringe is being injected, site of the injection, viscosity of the injectable fluid. The doctor has control over the above factors. The area of the injection can be numbed first.
Ed

Re: Thx for the advice

john h on 4/09/02 at 09:26 (078909)

Dr. Ed: Having had 3 injections over the past 5 years how right you are. Two were just mildly painful and one was considerably more painful. I have found that taking a very very deep breath and exhaling slowly helped a lot. One of the girls on the board reminded me that was the way you give birth! I wonder if the area is more inflamed on a particular day if that would not increase the pain?

Re: Thx for the advice

Janew on 4/18/02 at 01:06 (080083)

Compared to the pain in my feet the shots hurt for just a few seconds. Don't let them give you mutliple shots all over your feet. A GP did that to my partner and it was horrible. A good DPM (pod) knows what to do and you shouldn't have a problem. I've had four shots in my left feet and three in the right. They've helped for awhile but I'm still working on the long term solution.