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MORNING SHOW ON ESWT

Posted by Carmen on 4/05/02 at 07:43 (078556)

Dr. Z did you see the Early show on CBS???? It had a doc on there from Mass. hospital talking about ESWT!!!! It should have been you on there. ;-)

Re: MORNING SHOW ON ESWT

john a on 4/05/02 at 09:41 (078566)

I saw this too. More at http://www.cbsnews.com/earlyshow/healthwatch/healthnews/20020405hw_footherapy.shtml

The TV segment didn't mention which machine was used, though from the info below, it looks like it was Dornier. The patient interviewed claimed almost miraculous immediate recovery after three years of pain. Would that I were so lucky...

As is typical for short TV segments, details were sparse.

For people who hate following links, the text content of the link follows:.

'New Therapy For Heel Spurs Friday, April 5, 2002 - 12:00 AM ET

BOSTON -- An estimated two
and a half million people
suffer from the agonizing
foot pain caused by heel
spurs. Now a new therapy
using shock waves is
providing relief.

Dr. George Theodore is an orthopedist
at Mass General Hospital And Harvard
Medical School and Deborah Johnson is
one of his heel spur patients. They both
visit The Early Show to talk about this new therapy.

The plantar fascia is the thick, three-part bundle of fibrous connective
tissue that forms the foot arch running from the heel bone to the toes.
This tissue supplies support for the bottom of the foot, but it can become
inflexible, stiff, and swollen if a person suffers from plantar fasciitis.

Plantar fasciitis is commonly referred to as heel spurs, and is a painful
and sometimes debilitating condition. The condition often goes untreated
and afflicts approximately 2.5 million people in the United States every
year. In its chronic state, plantar fasciitis causes severe pain and can
prevent a sufferer from living a normal life. In some extreme cases,
patients are not able to get out of bed.

The condition is caused by an inflammation of the foot's tissue and is
caused when the plantar fascia pulls away from the heel and the bone
reacts by filling the space with new bone - a heel spur. Many people
think that the heel spur is the cause of the pain, but the pain is actually
caused by the inflammation or irritation of the plantar fascia.

There is a misconception that only athletes develop plantar fasciitis, but
anyone can develop the condition. There are several factors that
increase an individual's vulnerability for the condition, including: jobs
that require a person to be on their feet for many hours a day, wearing
high heels or shoes that don't fit correctly, flat feet, increased age,
obesity, high-arched rigid feet, inflexible Achilles tendon and extensive
athletic training.

The problem usually begins with repeated stress to the area, and people
will experience a dull pain, which comes and goes on the underside of
the foot. The pain usually starts in the morning or at the beginning of a
physical activity. Over time, it may progress to a sharper pain that is
aggravated by bearing the body's weight throughout the day. The tissue
will then become inflamed and rapidly get worse. Like most conditions, it
is ideal to treat plantar fasciitis at the beginning when it is not at an
advanced stage. Many people suffer in silence without seeking
professional help.

Sufferers typically cope with their condition by simply 'toughing it out,'
taking analgesics or trying to ease the pain with stretching and ice. Other
options people try include taping, heel-cushions, anti-inflammatory
medications and cortisone steroid shots. While these options work for
some people, many others still suffer after several months. In extreme
cases, when traditional treatment options have been exhausted, invasive
surgery is available. This option is costly, can lead to other health
problems and only has moderate success.

For more information, visit the Dornier MedTech. '

Re: MORNING SHOW ON ESWT

DavidP on 4/05/02 at 10:43 (078577)

Thanks for the recap for those of us who missed the expose.

Re: MORNING SHOW ON ESWT

Dr. Zuckerman on 4/06/02 at 06:49 (078649)

Hey Carmen,

If I ever go on the Early Show how about being the patient We can write our own lines

Re: MORNING SHOW ON ESWT

john a on 4/05/02 at 09:41 (078566)

I saw this too. More at http://www.cbsnews.com/earlyshow/healthwatch/healthnews/20020405hw_footherapy.shtml

The TV segment didn't mention which machine was used, though from the info below, it looks like it was Dornier. The patient interviewed claimed almost miraculous immediate recovery after three years of pain. Would that I were so lucky...

As is typical for short TV segments, details were sparse.

For people who hate following links, the text content of the link follows:.

'New Therapy For Heel Spurs Friday, April 5, 2002 - 12:00 AM ET

BOSTON -- An estimated two
and a half million people
suffer from the agonizing
foot pain caused by heel
spurs. Now a new therapy
using shock waves is
providing relief.

Dr. George Theodore is an orthopedist
at Mass General Hospital And Harvard
Medical School and Deborah Johnson is
one of his heel spur patients. They both
visit The Early Show to talk about this new therapy.

The plantar fascia is the thick, three-part bundle of fibrous connective
tissue that forms the foot arch running from the heel bone to the toes.
This tissue supplies support for the bottom of the foot, but it can become
inflexible, stiff, and swollen if a person suffers from plantar fasciitis.

Plantar fasciitis is commonly referred to as heel spurs, and is a painful
and sometimes debilitating condition. The condition often goes untreated
and afflicts approximately 2.5 million people in the United States every
year. In its chronic state, plantar fasciitis causes severe pain and can
prevent a sufferer from living a normal life. In some extreme cases,
patients are not able to get out of bed.

The condition is caused by an inflammation of the foot's tissue and is
caused when the plantar fascia pulls away from the heel and the bone
reacts by filling the space with new bone - a heel spur. Many people
think that the heel spur is the cause of the pain, but the pain is actually
caused by the inflammation or irritation of the plantar fascia.

There is a misconception that only athletes develop plantar fasciitis, but
anyone can develop the condition. There are several factors that
increase an individual's vulnerability for the condition, including: jobs
that require a person to be on their feet for many hours a day, wearing
high heels or shoes that don't fit correctly, flat feet, increased age,
obesity, high-arched rigid feet, inflexible Achilles tendon and extensive
athletic training.

The problem usually begins with repeated stress to the area, and people
will experience a dull pain, which comes and goes on the underside of
the foot. The pain usually starts in the morning or at the beginning of a
physical activity. Over time, it may progress to a sharper pain that is
aggravated by bearing the body's weight throughout the day. The tissue
will then become inflamed and rapidly get worse. Like most conditions, it
is ideal to treat plantar fasciitis at the beginning when it is not at an
advanced stage. Many people suffer in silence without seeking
professional help.

Sufferers typically cope with their condition by simply 'toughing it out,'
taking analgesics or trying to ease the pain with stretching and ice. Other
options people try include taping, heel-cushions, anti-inflammatory
medications and cortisone steroid shots. While these options work for
some people, many others still suffer after several months. In extreme
cases, when traditional treatment options have been exhausted, invasive
surgery is available. This option is costly, can lead to other health
problems and only has moderate success.

For more information, visit the Dornier MedTech. '

Re: MORNING SHOW ON ESWT

DavidP on 4/05/02 at 10:43 (078577)

Thanks for the recap for those of us who missed the expose.

Re: MORNING SHOW ON ESWT

Dr. Zuckerman on 4/06/02 at 06:49 (078649)

Hey Carmen,

If I ever go on the Early Show how about being the patient We can write our own lines