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POSTS

Posted by RACHAEL T. on 4/21/02 at 20:26 (080603)

To drs. or peds., or others in the know, I ask........can you explain 'posts' to me in orthotics....location, use, reaction, or whatever??? Is there a site I could surf to find this info?

Re: POSTS

Dr. Zuckerman on 4/21/02 at 21:05 (080604)

Hi

I will try this in simple terms. Posts or wedge of plastic, rubber are use to balance the back of the foot with the front of the foot. The goal of any orthosis is to place the foot into a neutral position during two phases of the walking cyle. First when the foot comes into contact with the ground and second when the foot pushes off the ground. So these posts are placed on the orthosis to position the foot to be neutral at these two very important part of the of the walkingin cycle.

Ok another way to explaine four legs on a table . You place wooden splints under any uneven leg to balance the any of the uneven legs so the table can support anything on top of it. how's that

Re: POSTS

RACHAEL T. on 4/21/02 at 22:17 (080614)

That was great! I 'got' the explanation. This was good - as I always thought that it 'changed or corrected' your 'breakover' - I guess I thought this - due to horse's shoeing changes & modifications with wedges, pads, & such......I got it! (-:

Re: POSTS

Dr. Zuckerman on 4/21/02 at 21:05 (080604)

Hi

I will try this in simple terms. Posts or wedge of plastic, rubber are use to balance the back of the foot with the front of the foot. The goal of any orthosis is to place the foot into a neutral position during two phases of the walking cyle. First when the foot comes into contact with the ground and second when the foot pushes off the ground. So these posts are placed on the orthosis to position the foot to be neutral at these two very important part of the of the walkingin cycle.

Ok another way to explaine four legs on a table . You place wooden splints under any uneven leg to balance the any of the uneven legs so the table can support anything on top of it. how's that

Re: POSTS

RACHAEL T. on 4/21/02 at 22:17 (080614)

That was great! I 'got' the explanation. This was good - as I always thought that it 'changed or corrected' your 'breakover' - I guess I thought this - due to horse's shoeing changes & modifications with wedges, pads, & such......I got it! (-: