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orthotics

Posted by Rachel W. on 4/22/02 at 07:13 (080628)

I'm from the U.K. Someone suggested to me that I could by Orthotics from Boots for about 20 pounds and they are good.
Would they be as good as orthotics especially made for me which would cost about 65 pounds from the Scholl shop?

Re: orthotics

Dr. John Cozzarelli on 4/22/02 at 09:51 (080638)

It sounds like an off the shelf device. Sometimes they feel ok and sometimes they don't. I think that custom made will work for you. If you buy off the shelf orthotics I would still do a break in period of wearing the device one hour the first day and then increase by one hour each day until wearing all day. It's worth a try.

Dr. John Cozzarelli

Re: orthotics

Rachel W. on 4/22/02 at 12:19 (080656)

Thankyou Dr. John

Re: orthotics

Pete R on 4/22/02 at 16:32 (080700)

The Boots ones are a good start, I had these initially and they helped, although unfortunately I didn't have this site to learn from and the problem over time got worse.

Later I had some 'custom' ones from Feet First and they were a rip off. I never wore them for more than a couple of hours since they were far too painful. You may find they will be ok for you but be careful, many companies in the Uk are making orthotics and the vast majority don't have a clue.

Try the Boots ones for a couple of weeks and see how you go.

I've just paid £300 for some customn ones which included gait analysis, with any changes made to them included for 6 months. I need to wear them in but they're the best so far.

Re: orthotics

Rachel W. on 4/23/02 at 10:43 (080811)

I have just bought a pair of Scholl pain relief inserts from Boots. They
didn't have anything else apart from Orthoheels which were ones for high heels (I don't know how anyone could wear high heels with this problem). Anyway, I also bought myself a pair of Nike Air trainers, put the inserts into them and felt instant relief. I don't know how they will affect me long term but I'll let you know. Thanks.

Re: orthotics

Pete R on 4/23/02 at 15:22 (080848)

Just make sure you are careful and take note of the precautions in the heel book, icing, stretching etc. Don't make the same mistake as me and initially do nothing !!

Re: orthotics

Rachel W. on 4/24/02 at 04:29 (080907)

O.K. Pete, thanks for the advice. I'm in a lot of pain, so the more information people give me the better. I thought when I bought the trainers and supports, because they felt better straight away, I would start getting better but it just seems to be getting worse. All these things everybody is telling me to do, I get confused whether they are helping cure the problem or they are just for temporary relief.

Re: orthotics

Pete R on 4/24/02 at 13:21 (080954)

I sympathise. I think its worth trying everything and then you may arrive at something that helps. Being in the UK does NOT help since the knowledge of PF is a joke with medical practitioners and I've had both NHS and private treatment. I think you get what you pay for, my expensive orthotics are far better than the cheaper versions but you maybe ok.

I'm likely to have ESWT at a clinic in Chelsea within the next month or so I'll let you know how I go.

How long you had PF ?

Are you having any form of physio which can help if you catch it early

Where do you live ?

Re: orthotics

Julie on 4/24/02 at 13:36 (080958)

Rachel, I've been away and am just catching up with the board and don't know your history, so forgive me if you've answered this question: have you seen a podiatrist? It's really essential to get a proper evaluation and diagnosis so that the right treatment programme for YOU can be put in place. Off the shelf orthotics can help in some cases, but you may need orthotics specially made to correct any biomechanical faults, and this can only be determined with specialist help. Don't delay in seeing someone: the earlier treatment starts, the better the chance of a smooth recovery.

I'm in London, and can recommend my podiatrist if that would help.

Re: orthotics

Rachel W. on 4/25/02 at 04:17 (081041)

I haven't had this problem for very long. I started a job as an assistant cook at the beginning of January. I had never had any problem with my feet at all before then and I'm not overweight. After about 6 weeks working there, my feet were feeling tired at the end of the day then after a while the heel of my right foot started to get painful. I just ignored it as I didn't have a clue what it was. I phoned my doctor and first he told me to take Nurofen. I phoned him a week later, said it was getting worse so he prescribed me diclofenac and warned me to take them after meals otherwise it would burn a hole in my stomach (that frightened me a bit).
Anyway, I didn't want to take time off work as I'd only just started there and the doctor didn't advise me to have a break either so I just thought I would carry on until I had two weeks off over the Easter Holidays (work in a school so get all the holidays).
Over the holidays my foot was getting worse so when I was due back to work I went to see my doctor saying there was no way I could work because of the pain, and it was then that he diagnosed me with PF.
He has referred me to a foot clinic but I have heard nothing. The only thing I can rely on at the moment is this website, otherwise I'm on my own.

Re: orthotics

Julie on 4/25/02 at 11:08 (081087)

OK. First: it's important that you get seen soon. I have no idea how long you might have to wait for an appointment at the foot clinic (presumably at your local hospital) but the chances are it's a lengthy waiting list, like most other waiting lists. Can you afford to see a podiatrist privately? If you can, you should: PF won't go away by itself, and the sooner you are diagnosed and treated the better.

This is not what you want to hear, but it's very likely that your new on-your-feet-all-day job triggered your PF, and it is going to be very difficult to heal while you are still doing that job. Is there anything else you can do at the restaurant, or any other type of work you're qualified to do that would allow you to get off your feet? Standing jobs are the worst, particularly on hard floors.

If you can't change your work situation, do start paying attention to your footgear. There are so many types of shoes for different types of feet and different conditions that it's impossible to make specific recommendations. A pod will be able to once s/he has examined and diagnosed you, but meanwhile I think you should be looking for a stable, supportive trainer with plenty of sole thickness and cushioning. And make sure they are the right size! So many people go on buying the same size shoe they wore when they were 18. Get measured and fitted in a good store. I don't know how old you are, but feet spread - I now wear a size and a half bigger than I did 20 years ago.

You might find taping a help. There is a section on taping in Part 2 of the Heel Pain Book (which I hope you've read, if not, do). Taping supplies the support the arch needs and can no longer get from the injured fascia. It not only relieves pain, but in providing support, actually 'rests' the fascia and gives it a chance to heal. If taping helps, it is an indication that custom orthotics will help.

As you know, I've been away, so please excuse me if I'm repeating counsel you've already been given. And do let me know where you are in England just in case I have some ideas about where to go.

Re: orthotics

Rachel W. on 4/25/02 at 12:23 (081097)

Hi Julie,

First of all I don't think I'll be going back to my job as it gave me the damn problem in the first place. My five children are enough work at the moment without doing anything else. I'm 35 years old and I live in Watford, Herts.
I don't think I could afford a Pod. Well I'm not sure how much they charge but I can imagine they are quite expensive. I'm just finding out different things to do on this website. It seems very helpful.
Could you tell me what sort of tape to use. Is it any old tape?

Re: orthotics

Julie on 4/25/02 at 16:01 (081110)

Hi Rachel

I'm glad you've left your standing job.

My podiatrist in London charged ?60 for the initial consultation (an hour). I think subsequent appointments were ?30 or ?35. I only needed two - not an enormous outlay, I felt, for the help I got from him. The initial consultation included a complete biomechanical evaluation of my walking, with a treadmill and a video camera. If you needed custom orthotics, that would run you another ?225 (may be slightly out of date - that's what mine cost 18 months ago).

He has a website, so if you're interested go to http://www.londonpodiatry.com

I used 1 1/2 inch Leuko tape. It's made by Beiersdorf, and I got it first from my pod and then from Bell and Croydon in Wigmore Street, but I'm sure you'd find it at a well-stocked chemists. It costs ?5 or ?6 a roll, but lasts a long time if you stick to the simple two-strip method as illustrated and explained in Scott's heel pain book. If you decide to try it and need any help, please let me know.

You've probably been told all this already, but here are a few more tips:

Never go barefoot.

Icing (use a gel pack or a bag of frozen peas) reduces inflammation and therefore pain.

Stay off your feet as much as possible. Not easy, I guess, with five children, but then again if you have that many, at least one or two or them are probably old enough to take over some of the chores!

When you have to walk, walk as normally as possible (this is where taping will help). Altering your gait to favour the painful foot is bound to cause knock-on problems further up: knees, hips, lower back.

But do see a podiatrist if you possibly can. You don't just have a sore foot, you have a debilitating condition that can become chronic and disabling if not properly treated.

Re: PS

Julie on 4/25/02 at 16:02 (081111)

All those question marks were supposed to be pound signs. My computer does this funny thing sometimes.

Re: PS

Rachel W. on 4/25/02 at 16:21 (081114)

Thanks Julie. I guessed about the question marks. I realise that PF could stay with me for a long time. I'll take note of your suggestions and advice. I don't know what I'd do it wasn't for this website.

Re: orthotics

Dr. John Cozzarelli on 4/22/02 at 09:51 (080638)

It sounds like an off the shelf device. Sometimes they feel ok and sometimes they don't. I think that custom made will work for you. If you buy off the shelf orthotics I would still do a break in period of wearing the device one hour the first day and then increase by one hour each day until wearing all day. It's worth a try.

Dr. John Cozzarelli

Re: orthotics

Rachel W. on 4/22/02 at 12:19 (080656)

Thankyou Dr. John

Re: orthotics

Pete R on 4/22/02 at 16:32 (080700)

The Boots ones are a good start, I had these initially and they helped, although unfortunately I didn't have this site to learn from and the problem over time got worse.

Later I had some 'custom' ones from Feet First and they were a rip off. I never wore them for more than a couple of hours since they were far too painful. You may find they will be ok for you but be careful, many companies in the Uk are making orthotics and the vast majority don't have a clue.

Try the Boots ones for a couple of weeks and see how you go.

I've just paid £300 for some customn ones which included gait analysis, with any changes made to them included for 6 months. I need to wear them in but they're the best so far.

Re: orthotics

Rachel W. on 4/23/02 at 10:43 (080811)

I have just bought a pair of Scholl pain relief inserts from Boots. They
didn't have anything else apart from Orthoheels which were ones for high heels (I don't know how anyone could wear high heels with this problem). Anyway, I also bought myself a pair of Nike Air trainers, put the inserts into them and felt instant relief. I don't know how they will affect me long term but I'll let you know. Thanks.

Re: orthotics

Pete R on 4/23/02 at 15:22 (080848)

Just make sure you are careful and take note of the precautions in the heel book, icing, stretching etc. Don't make the same mistake as me and initially do nothing !!

Re: orthotics

Rachel W. on 4/24/02 at 04:29 (080907)

O.K. Pete, thanks for the advice. I'm in a lot of pain, so the more information people give me the better. I thought when I bought the trainers and supports, because they felt better straight away, I would start getting better but it just seems to be getting worse. All these things everybody is telling me to do, I get confused whether they are helping cure the problem or they are just for temporary relief.

Re: orthotics

Pete R on 4/24/02 at 13:21 (080954)

I sympathise. I think its worth trying everything and then you may arrive at something that helps. Being in the UK does NOT help since the knowledge of PF is a joke with medical practitioners and I've had both NHS and private treatment. I think you get what you pay for, my expensive orthotics are far better than the cheaper versions but you maybe ok.

I'm likely to have ESWT at a clinic in Chelsea within the next month or so I'll let you know how I go.

How long you had PF ?

Are you having any form of physio which can help if you catch it early

Where do you live ?

Re: orthotics

Julie on 4/24/02 at 13:36 (080958)

Rachel, I've been away and am just catching up with the board and don't know your history, so forgive me if you've answered this question: have you seen a podiatrist? It's really essential to get a proper evaluation and diagnosis so that the right treatment programme for YOU can be put in place. Off the shelf orthotics can help in some cases, but you may need orthotics specially made to correct any biomechanical faults, and this can only be determined with specialist help. Don't delay in seeing someone: the earlier treatment starts, the better the chance of a smooth recovery.

I'm in London, and can recommend my podiatrist if that would help.

Re: orthotics

Rachel W. on 4/25/02 at 04:17 (081041)

I haven't had this problem for very long. I started a job as an assistant cook at the beginning of January. I had never had any problem with my feet at all before then and I'm not overweight. After about 6 weeks working there, my feet were feeling tired at the end of the day then after a while the heel of my right foot started to get painful. I just ignored it as I didn't have a clue what it was. I phoned my doctor and first he told me to take Nurofen. I phoned him a week later, said it was getting worse so he prescribed me diclofenac and warned me to take them after meals otherwise it would burn a hole in my stomach (that frightened me a bit).
Anyway, I didn't want to take time off work as I'd only just started there and the doctor didn't advise me to have a break either so I just thought I would carry on until I had two weeks off over the Easter Holidays (work in a school so get all the holidays).
Over the holidays my foot was getting worse so when I was due back to work I went to see my doctor saying there was no way I could work because of the pain, and it was then that he diagnosed me with PF.
He has referred me to a foot clinic but I have heard nothing. The only thing I can rely on at the moment is this website, otherwise I'm on my own.

Re: orthotics

Julie on 4/25/02 at 11:08 (081087)

OK. First: it's important that you get seen soon. I have no idea how long you might have to wait for an appointment at the foot clinic (presumably at your local hospital) but the chances are it's a lengthy waiting list, like most other waiting lists. Can you afford to see a podiatrist privately? If you can, you should: PF won't go away by itself, and the sooner you are diagnosed and treated the better.

This is not what you want to hear, but it's very likely that your new on-your-feet-all-day job triggered your PF, and it is going to be very difficult to heal while you are still doing that job. Is there anything else you can do at the restaurant, or any other type of work you're qualified to do that would allow you to get off your feet? Standing jobs are the worst, particularly on hard floors.

If you can't change your work situation, do start paying attention to your footgear. There are so many types of shoes for different types of feet and different conditions that it's impossible to make specific recommendations. A pod will be able to once s/he has examined and diagnosed you, but meanwhile I think you should be looking for a stable, supportive trainer with plenty of sole thickness and cushioning. And make sure they are the right size! So many people go on buying the same size shoe they wore when they were 18. Get measured and fitted in a good store. I don't know how old you are, but feet spread - I now wear a size and a half bigger than I did 20 years ago.

You might find taping a help. There is a section on taping in Part 2 of the Heel Pain Book (which I hope you've read, if not, do). Taping supplies the support the arch needs and can no longer get from the injured fascia. It not only relieves pain, but in providing support, actually 'rests' the fascia and gives it a chance to heal. If taping helps, it is an indication that custom orthotics will help.

As you know, I've been away, so please excuse me if I'm repeating counsel you've already been given. And do let me know where you are in England just in case I have some ideas about where to go.

Re: orthotics

Rachel W. on 4/25/02 at 12:23 (081097)

Hi Julie,

First of all I don't think I'll be going back to my job as it gave me the damn problem in the first place. My five children are enough work at the moment without doing anything else. I'm 35 years old and I live in Watford, Herts.
I don't think I could afford a Pod. Well I'm not sure how much they charge but I can imagine they are quite expensive. I'm just finding out different things to do on this website. It seems very helpful.
Could you tell me what sort of tape to use. Is it any old tape?

Re: orthotics

Julie on 4/25/02 at 16:01 (081110)

Hi Rachel

I'm glad you've left your standing job.

My podiatrist in London charged ?60 for the initial consultation (an hour). I think subsequent appointments were ?30 or ?35. I only needed two - not an enormous outlay, I felt, for the help I got from him. The initial consultation included a complete biomechanical evaluation of my walking, with a treadmill and a video camera. If you needed custom orthotics, that would run you another ?225 (may be slightly out of date - that's what mine cost 18 months ago).

He has a website, so if you're interested go to http://www.londonpodiatry.com

I used 1 1/2 inch Leuko tape. It's made by Beiersdorf, and I got it first from my pod and then from Bell and Croydon in Wigmore Street, but I'm sure you'd find it at a well-stocked chemists. It costs ?5 or ?6 a roll, but lasts a long time if you stick to the simple two-strip method as illustrated and explained in Scott's heel pain book. If you decide to try it and need any help, please let me know.

You've probably been told all this already, but here are a few more tips:

Never go barefoot.

Icing (use a gel pack or a bag of frozen peas) reduces inflammation and therefore pain.

Stay off your feet as much as possible. Not easy, I guess, with five children, but then again if you have that many, at least one or two or them are probably old enough to take over some of the chores!

When you have to walk, walk as normally as possible (this is where taping will help). Altering your gait to favour the painful foot is bound to cause knock-on problems further up: knees, hips, lower back.

But do see a podiatrist if you possibly can. You don't just have a sore foot, you have a debilitating condition that can become chronic and disabling if not properly treated.

Re: PS

Julie on 4/25/02 at 16:02 (081111)

All those question marks were supposed to be pound signs. My computer does this funny thing sometimes.

Re: PS

Rachel W. on 4/25/02 at 16:21 (081114)

Thanks Julie. I guessed about the question marks. I realise that PF could stay with me for a long time. I'll take note of your suggestions and advice. I don't know what I'd do it wasn't for this website.