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orthotics

Posted by Daniel C. on 4/28/02 at 16:41 (081490)

Can custom orthotics be made for work shoes? Also, what if the shoes are no good after the orthotics are made? Does this mean that I would have to have another set made? Do you need to make a set of orthotics for each pair of shoes that you have? I know these are a lot of questions? Thanks for any responses.

Re: orthotics

Carmen on 4/28/02 at 18:20 (081496)

Depending on the type of orthotics you get they may be ab;e to fit in many pairs...the docs will advise better. BUT I do advise you get shoes that are WORTH putting orthotics into...the orthotics must work with the shoe and cheapies won't give you the support you need.
Just fyi...

Re: orthotics

Richard, C.Ped on 4/29/02 at 09:08 (081569)

Hi Daniel,
orthotics can be made for almost all types of shoes. Ladie's pumps are pretty much out for a really good fitting orthotic. Hopefully, you do not have to worry about that. :-)

What type of work shoes are you talking about? Steel toe, dress, boots?
Dress shoes are ok except for the toe box. Most dress shoes have a shallow toe box. This matters because if you have an orthotic made with material extending under your toes, this could take up excess room and push your toes into the top of the toe box. Very uncomfortable.

The orthotic must be interfaced with your shoes. This means the bottom of the orthotic must sit flat within the shoe. If it does not, the orthotic will not work properly.

The orthotic should not be rounded on the bottom at all. It should not rock back and fourth in the shoe.

normally, if the orthotic can be fitted to an athletic shoe, there should not be a problem with it being able to go into other shoes. Most athletic shoes are called a sock lasted shoe. This has to do with the stitching, and is more difficult to fit with an orthosis.

SHOES:
Invest in a couple good pairs of shoes. Work shoes and athletic shoes. Let me know what type of work shoes you need, and we can give you some advice. Athletic shoes, my favorites are New Balance and Brooks. I am wearing my Brooks Vapor shoes right now. They cost around $70. Not to bad for such a good shoe.

Find a few different C.Peds (Board Certified Pedorthist) either in your area or out, and ask questions. Use this link to find the C.Ped:
http://cpeds.org/MEMBERS/SEARCH.CFM

I also have a section on my web site that gives you questions to ask when you are being fitted for orthotics. This is at:
http://msnhomepages.talkcity.com/SupportSt/metatarsalgia/

If that link does not work, go to the 'Inserts/Orthotics/Shoes message board and click on my name at the top of the page. that will take you there.

Good luck! Let me know what type of work shoes you are talking about.
Richard, C.Ped

Re: orthotics

Daniel C. on 4/29/02 at 17:12 (081613)

Hi,

Thanks for your help! I have regular dress shoes. I will check out the links that you have provided. Thanks again!

Re: orthotics

Richard, C.Ped on 4/29/02 at 18:01 (081635)

if it is just a regular dress shoe, a 3/4 may be the way to go so you do not scrunch your toes.
Richard

Re: orthotics

lisa k on 4/30/02 at 01:08 (081706)

can orthodicts hurt very flat pronated feet, thaanks for any response

Re: orthotics new plz answ docs thx :) 2may

lisa k on 5/03/02 at 01:18 (082251)

same question can orthoditc hurt VERY flat pronated feet what type are reccomended thx

Re: orthotics new plz answ docs thx :) 2may

Richard, C.Ped on 5/03/02 at 08:48 (082284)

Hi Lisa,
The flat foot has a harder time adjusting to the support of the orthosis, in my opinion. If you are casted correctly, your ankle will be in sub talor neutral. This almost always 'creates and arch' and allows you to stand the way you should be standing...in a neutral position. Your feet will not like the support under the arch..and they will be certain to let you know. I tell people with very flat feet that they have to slowly get used to wearing the orthosis. You may want to start out at only fifteen minutes the first day..and increase by five to fifteen the other days.

Only you know how much you can take each day, so pay attention to your feet and go at your own pace.

Down the road, if the arch support seems to feel 'to high', you may want to ask about being posted for forefoot varus.

The type of orthosis depends on how sensitive your feet are. I do not like to start someone that has very flat feet with a hard or rigid (or even semi rigid) orthosis that has never worn orthotics before. Most of the time, if that is done, it will take longer to get used to wearing them, the patient gets frustrated, and the orthosis ends up in the trash or the closet. Of course, without knowing your background or seeing you in person, I can not really tell the actual device that would be best for you.

Good luck! If you have any other questions, fire away!
Richard

Re: orthotics

Carmen on 4/28/02 at 18:20 (081496)

Depending on the type of orthotics you get they may be ab;e to fit in many pairs...the docs will advise better. BUT I do advise you get shoes that are WORTH putting orthotics into...the orthotics must work with the shoe and cheapies won't give you the support you need.
Just fyi...

Re: orthotics

Richard, C.Ped on 4/29/02 at 09:08 (081569)

Hi Daniel,
orthotics can be made for almost all types of shoes. Ladie's pumps are pretty much out for a really good fitting orthotic. Hopefully, you do not have to worry about that. :-)

What type of work shoes are you talking about? Steel toe, dress, boots?
Dress shoes are ok except for the toe box. Most dress shoes have a shallow toe box. This matters because if you have an orthotic made with material extending under your toes, this could take up excess room and push your toes into the top of the toe box. Very uncomfortable.

The orthotic must be interfaced with your shoes. This means the bottom of the orthotic must sit flat within the shoe. If it does not, the orthotic will not work properly.

The orthotic should not be rounded on the bottom at all. It should not rock back and fourth in the shoe.

normally, if the orthotic can be fitted to an athletic shoe, there should not be a problem with it being able to go into other shoes. Most athletic shoes are called a sock lasted shoe. This has to do with the stitching, and is more difficult to fit with an orthosis.

SHOES:
Invest in a couple good pairs of shoes. Work shoes and athletic shoes. Let me know what type of work shoes you need, and we can give you some advice. Athletic shoes, my favorites are New Balance and Brooks. I am wearing my Brooks Vapor shoes right now. They cost around $70. Not to bad for such a good shoe.

Find a few different C.Peds (Board Certified Pedorthist) either in your area or out, and ask questions. Use this link to find the C.Ped:
http://cpeds.org/MEMBERS/SEARCH.CFM

I also have a section on my web site that gives you questions to ask when you are being fitted for orthotics. This is at:
http://msnhomepages.talkcity.com/SupportSt/metatarsalgia/

If that link does not work, go to the 'Inserts/Orthotics/Shoes message board and click on my name at the top of the page. that will take you there.

Good luck! Let me know what type of work shoes you are talking about.
Richard, C.Ped

Re: orthotics

Daniel C. on 4/29/02 at 17:12 (081613)

Hi,

Thanks for your help! I have regular dress shoes. I will check out the links that you have provided. Thanks again!

Re: orthotics

Richard, C.Ped on 4/29/02 at 18:01 (081635)

if it is just a regular dress shoe, a 3/4 may be the way to go so you do not scrunch your toes.
Richard

Re: orthotics

lisa k on 4/30/02 at 01:08 (081706)

can orthodicts hurt very flat pronated feet, thaanks for any response

Re: orthotics new plz answ docs thx :) 2may

lisa k on 5/03/02 at 01:18 (082251)

same question can orthoditc hurt VERY flat pronated feet what type are reccomended thx

Re: orthotics new plz answ docs thx :) 2may

Richard, C.Ped on 5/03/02 at 08:48 (082284)

Hi Lisa,
The flat foot has a harder time adjusting to the support of the orthosis, in my opinion. If you are casted correctly, your ankle will be in sub talor neutral. This almost always 'creates and arch' and allows you to stand the way you should be standing...in a neutral position. Your feet will not like the support under the arch..and they will be certain to let you know. I tell people with very flat feet that they have to slowly get used to wearing the orthosis. You may want to start out at only fifteen minutes the first day..and increase by five to fifteen the other days.

Only you know how much you can take each day, so pay attention to your feet and go at your own pace.

Down the road, if the arch support seems to feel 'to high', you may want to ask about being posted for forefoot varus.

The type of orthosis depends on how sensitive your feet are. I do not like to start someone that has very flat feet with a hard or rigid (or even semi rigid) orthosis that has never worn orthotics before. Most of the time, if that is done, it will take longer to get used to wearing them, the patient gets frustrated, and the orthosis ends up in the trash or the closet. Of course, without knowing your background or seeing you in person, I can not really tell the actual device that would be best for you.

Good luck! If you have any other questions, fire away!
Richard