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Radiotherapy for calcaneal spurs

Posted by Fabian S. on 4/28/02 at 16:44 (081491)

Has anyone got some more information or experience with radiotherapy for calcaneal spurs?
Email: (email removed)

Thank you.

Re: Radiotherapy for calcaneal spurs

Dr. Cozzarelli on 4/29/02 at 19:56 (081659)

Fabian:

Radiotherpay is actually called Stereotactic Radio Frequency Thermal Lesioning. The procedure involves insertin a 22 gauge needle exactly in pain spots. The needle is removed and a mono-filament wire is inserted. The radionics unit then desenatizes the nerve which is causing pain. This is verified by confirming that there is no motor response. There are no incisions or stitches perfomed with this technique. The needles are guided fluoroscopically. The needles are left in place for 90 seconds. Band Aids are applied after the procedure. Success rate is about 92% successful. Patient's must be able to pin point pain locations.

Dr. John Cozzarelli

Re: Radiotherapy for calcaneal spurs

Fabi S on 5/01/02 at 20:16 (082063)

Radiothearpy - isn't that also x-ray treatment with up to 5 Gy ?

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Many patients attend orthopedic departments complaining of pain on the plantar aspect of the calcaneum. The symptoms may subside spontaneously, but often persist. Treatment is usually by local injection of a corticosteroid, orthopedic devices or other standard treatment. If these methods fail, X-ray treatment may be considered. The efficacy of radiotherapy of the calcaneal spur was evaluated. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From April 1981 through December 1991, 18 patients with painful heel were irradiated mostly with the caesium or telecobalt unit, usually with a dose of 4 times 0.5 Gy. Among these patients, 12 could be followed up during a prolonged period on the basis of questionnaires. RESULTS: According to the categories of v. Pannewitz 17% of the patients were pain-free by the end of the treatment course, 22% showed marked improvement, 33% showed improvement and in 28% the pain was not influenced. Over an average of 41.5 months 58% of the patients reported freedom from pain. CONCLUSIONS: Low-dose radiotherapy appears to relieve the painful heel syndrome in a high proportion of patients. The overall treatment risk appears to be very small. The mechanism of low-dose radiotherapy is unknown. NLM PUBMED CIT. ID: 7740407 SOURCE: Strahlenther Onkol 1995 Apr;171(4):202-6 130

Re: Radiotherapy for calcaneal spurs

Dr. Cozzarelli on 4/29/02 at 19:56 (081659)

Fabian:

Radiotherpay is actually called Stereotactic Radio Frequency Thermal Lesioning. The procedure involves insertin a 22 gauge needle exactly in pain spots. The needle is removed and a mono-filament wire is inserted. The radionics unit then desenatizes the nerve which is causing pain. This is verified by confirming that there is no motor response. There are no incisions or stitches perfomed with this technique. The needles are guided fluoroscopically. The needles are left in place for 90 seconds. Band Aids are applied after the procedure. Success rate is about 92% successful. Patient's must be able to pin point pain locations.

Dr. John Cozzarelli

Re: Radiotherapy for calcaneal spurs

Fabi S on 5/01/02 at 20:16 (082063)

Radiothearpy - isn't that also x-ray treatment with up to 5 Gy ?

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Many patients attend orthopedic departments complaining of pain on the plantar aspect of the calcaneum. The symptoms may subside spontaneously, but often persist. Treatment is usually by local injection of a corticosteroid, orthopedic devices or other standard treatment. If these methods fail, X-ray treatment may be considered. The efficacy of radiotherapy of the calcaneal spur was evaluated. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From April 1981 through December 1991, 18 patients with painful heel were irradiated mostly with the caesium or telecobalt unit, usually with a dose of 4 times 0.5 Gy. Among these patients, 12 could be followed up during a prolonged period on the basis of questionnaires. RESULTS: According to the categories of v. Pannewitz 17% of the patients were pain-free by the end of the treatment course, 22% showed marked improvement, 33% showed improvement and in 28% the pain was not influenced. Over an average of 41.5 months 58% of the patients reported freedom from pain. CONCLUSIONS: Low-dose radiotherapy appears to relieve the painful heel syndrome in a high proportion of patients. The overall treatment risk appears to be very small. The mechanism of low-dose radiotherapy is unknown. NLM PUBMED CIT. ID: 7740407 SOURCE: Strahlenther Onkol 1995 Apr;171(4):202-6 130