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Symptoms of tibialis posterior tendon problems

Posted by Pete R on 4/29/02 at 04:06 (081550)

I have many of the typical pf symptoms and have been diagnosed by a pod with this. However, I don't have heel pain to the touch and not very much pain in the morning.

In addition the inside bottom part of my ankle is sore to the touch on both feet, although the ankle area doesn't hurt when I walk etc. The inside area of my arch where it meets the heel pad is also sore to the touch and when walking, as is the underside of the arch.The ball of my foot is also sore and the whole of the underside of my foot is painful if I'm walking for 30 mins or so

Could this be problems with the tibialis posterior tendon and, if so, what symptoms would I have. Can it mimic some of the pf symptoms ?

Many thanks

Re: Symptoms of tibialis posterior tendon problems

Dr. Cozzarelli on 4/29/02 at 05:50 (081553)

Yes it can.
Are you using and orthotic?

Dr. John Cozzarelli

Re: Symptoms of tibialis posterior tendon problems

Pete R on 4/29/02 at 06:53 (081558)

Yes I've had several orthotics, the latest one's being the best, arrived 2 weeks ago. They take into account the forefoot to rear foot movement, it's too early to say whether they will solve the problem. I've had the pain for 2 years and it's a case of finding a definite diagnosis and treating accordingly.

I've tried all conservative PF treatments and am contemplating ESWT, which clearly won't be prudent if it's not actually pf.

Working barefoot is painful (I stopped doing this many months ago)after a few minutes but i Don't get first step morning pain.

What's the easiest way to diagnose tibialis posterior tendon problems ?

Thanks

Re: Symptoms of tibialis posterior tendon problems

Dr. Cozzarelli on 4/29/02 at 17:33 (081620)

MRI or Diagnostic ultrasound is the easiest way to make the diagnosis.

Dr. John Cozzarelli

Re: Symptoms of tibialis posterior tendon problems

Dr. David S. Wander on 4/29/02 at 20:38 (081674)

In addition to diagnostic testing such as MRI and diagnostic ultrasound, there are other methods that we use to assess whether there is posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. Often, if there is severe dysfunction or a tear, the affected foot will actually appear 'flatter' than the opposite foot. Addtionally, it is often difficult to stand on the toes of the affected foot. Your doctor may ask you to stand only on the affected foot, (with the other foot off the ground), and then ask you to slowly raise onto your toes on the affected foot. With an injury to the posterior tibial tendon, this will often be difficult or impossible. Address your concerns with your doctor. If he/she feels that a partial tear, etc., exists MRI or diagnostic ultrasound can confirm the diagnosis.

Re: Symptoms of tibialis posterior tendon problems

Dr. Cozzarelli on 4/29/02 at 05:50 (081553)

Yes it can.
Are you using and orthotic?

Dr. John Cozzarelli

Re: Symptoms of tibialis posterior tendon problems

Pete R on 4/29/02 at 06:53 (081558)

Yes I've had several orthotics, the latest one's being the best, arrived 2 weeks ago. They take into account the forefoot to rear foot movement, it's too early to say whether they will solve the problem. I've had the pain for 2 years and it's a case of finding a definite diagnosis and treating accordingly.

I've tried all conservative PF treatments and am contemplating ESWT, which clearly won't be prudent if it's not actually pf.

Working barefoot is painful (I stopped doing this many months ago)after a few minutes but i Don't get first step morning pain.

What's the easiest way to diagnose tibialis posterior tendon problems ?

Thanks

Re: Symptoms of tibialis posterior tendon problems

Dr. Cozzarelli on 4/29/02 at 17:33 (081620)

MRI or Diagnostic ultrasound is the easiest way to make the diagnosis.

Dr. John Cozzarelli

Re: Symptoms of tibialis posterior tendon problems

Dr. David S. Wander on 4/29/02 at 20:38 (081674)

In addition to diagnostic testing such as MRI and diagnostic ultrasound, there are other methods that we use to assess whether there is posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. Often, if there is severe dysfunction or a tear, the affected foot will actually appear 'flatter' than the opposite foot. Addtionally, it is often difficult to stand on the toes of the affected foot. Your doctor may ask you to stand only on the affected foot, (with the other foot off the ground), and then ask you to slowly raise onto your toes on the affected foot. With an injury to the posterior tibial tendon, this will often be difficult or impossible. Address your concerns with your doctor. If he/she feels that a partial tear, etc., exists MRI or diagnostic ultrasound can confirm the diagnosis.