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Calf cramps

Posted by Scott L. on 4/29/02 at 19:13 (081651)

I have been told my podiatrist that I have flat feet, over pronate and have plantar fascia. I have been fitted for custom orthodics and still have pain in my heel area. But one of my biggest problems is that during long activity (tennis match or basketball game) I get severe cramps(charliehorse) in my calves. My doctor says it is because I overpronate and overuse those muscles. He hasnt been able to help me. Is there anything I can do or buy to ease my pain?

Re: Calf cramps

SonnyK on 4/29/02 at 21:27 (081685)

I will be very interested in any response to Scott's question. I have flat feet, over pronate, have custom orhtodics, had TTS surgery in August..I have very bad calf and foot cramps at night...very painful.

Re: Calf cramps

Julie on 4/30/02 at 02:44 (081712)

Lack of calcium and salt cause cramp, and if you sweat a great deal while playing you're losing both and may need to supplement them in your diet. Look at this aspect, as well as your biomechanics, which may be part of the problem but probably don't account for the whole of it.

Re: Calf cramps

Carmen on 4/30/02 at 07:41 (081729)

STRETCH those calves, That helps. It releases any crampy feeling and is good for PF.

Re: Calf cramps

Richard, C.Ped on 4/30/02 at 08:41 (081745)

The fact that you overpronate and overuse those muscles should not matter if you have the custom orthtotics....unless....they are made incorrectly. Not knowing how long you have had and have been actually wearing the orthosis is a key issue as well.

I do like Julie's theory about the sodium and electrolyte loss. Did you experience the cramps before you received the orthotics?

Also, as Carmen stated, make sure you stretch out before the activity.

If it is plantar fasciitis that you have been diagnosed with, you may also want to consider slowing down a bit and resting the fascia for awhile.

Your compalaint also makes me wonder if you have a short heel cord. Test this by sitting in a chair with your feet flat on the floor and your legs at a 90 degree angle. Dorsiflex, or raise your forefoot off the floor leaving your heel on the floor (as if you were tapping your foot to a song). If you can raise more than the width of your little finger, you are ok. If not, you may have a short heel cord.

Also, having flat feet may mean you have forefoot varus. That should have been posted in the orthosis. If not, you may want to look in to that. Forefoot varus means that the first metatarsal head (the ball of the big toe) is basically higher off the floor than the other met heads. What you do to post for this is to extend the posting material under the first met head to basicially bring the floor to the foot. If this is not posted, that could be causing excess torque on your muscles.

Richard

Re: Calf cramps

SonnyK on 4/29/02 at 21:27 (081685)

I will be very interested in any response to Scott's question. I have flat feet, over pronate, have custom orhtodics, had TTS surgery in August..I have very bad calf and foot cramps at night...very painful.

Re: Calf cramps

Julie on 4/30/02 at 02:44 (081712)

Lack of calcium and salt cause cramp, and if you sweat a great deal while playing you're losing both and may need to supplement them in your diet. Look at this aspect, as well as your biomechanics, which may be part of the problem but probably don't account for the whole of it.

Re: Calf cramps

Carmen on 4/30/02 at 07:41 (081729)

STRETCH those calves, That helps. It releases any crampy feeling and is good for PF.

Re: Calf cramps

Richard, C.Ped on 4/30/02 at 08:41 (081745)

The fact that you overpronate and overuse those muscles should not matter if you have the custom orthtotics....unless....they are made incorrectly. Not knowing how long you have had and have been actually wearing the orthosis is a key issue as well.

I do like Julie's theory about the sodium and electrolyte loss. Did you experience the cramps before you received the orthotics?

Also, as Carmen stated, make sure you stretch out before the activity.

If it is plantar fasciitis that you have been diagnosed with, you may also want to consider slowing down a bit and resting the fascia for awhile.

Your compalaint also makes me wonder if you have a short heel cord. Test this by sitting in a chair with your feet flat on the floor and your legs at a 90 degree angle. Dorsiflex, or raise your forefoot off the floor leaving your heel on the floor (as if you were tapping your foot to a song). If you can raise more than the width of your little finger, you are ok. If not, you may have a short heel cord.

Also, having flat feet may mean you have forefoot varus. That should have been posted in the orthosis. If not, you may want to look in to that. Forefoot varus means that the first metatarsal head (the ball of the big toe) is basically higher off the floor than the other met heads. What you do to post for this is to extend the posting material under the first met head to basicially bring the floor to the foot. If this is not posted, that could be causing excess torque on your muscles.

Richard