Home The Book Dr Articles Products Message Boards Journal Articles Search Our Surveys Surgery ESWT Dr Messages Find Good Drs video

What kind of work can you do with TTS?

Posted by Margie on 5/09/02 at 15:11 (083243)

SS has denied my case so now I am going for my first visit with a lawyer. Trying to get all information I can to help me with this case. My DR. who did the surgery (TT release) on both feet has diagnosed me to have bilateral tarsal tunnel syndrome and failed to respond to max. efforts at rehabilitation. And he also states I am permanently disabled.
I am limited to standing, walking and sitting for a short time. Moving constantly to try and ease the pain. Around 3 P.M. and it is time for the heating pad and feet up.
Has anyone tried and received disability for these conditions?
What kind of work could I do if they deny me again?
I am needing some patients who have gone through this for more proof that it is a real problem and limits us.
I do appreciate your input so far and will appreciate more.
Thank you again,
Margie

Re: What kind of work can you do with TTS?

Lara T on 5/09/02 at 20:54 (083304)

I have considered this question and have come up with a few jobs at varying skill levels and salary, that don't require much in the way of feet - depending on your situation. Some of these jobs require some walking which may be more than some on this list can tolerate:

1. mediator (requires 40 - 100 hours of training)
2. receptionist (if you don't have to run the mail around & such - big firms often have one person at the front desk to greet and answer the phone.)
3. court reporter (requires a certificate - about 30-40 hours I think - pays very well)
4. sign language interpreter (again requires certification)
5. telemarketer
6. teaching at the high school level or above - maybe caring for infants -depending on how many infants. A wheel chair could be used part of the day.
7. typist
8. bus driver (don't know the training required)
9. medical stenographer

Well, that's all I've thought of so far. I think it might be useful for many of us to continue this brainstorming as many of us face the same question regardless of whether we are seeking disability or worker's comp, or VESID, etc.

Re: What kind of work can you do with TTS?

Julie on 5/10/02 at 02:05 (083321)

Margie, if the doctor who performed your surgery has said that you are permanently disabled, and is prepared to state this in writing, surely that will go some way towards a successful disability claim?

I like Lara's list (not sure about 'bus driver', though - the feet would have lots of pedal work to do) and agree it's a good idea to think about these possibilities.

Re: What kind of work can you do with TTS?

J. King on 5/10/02 at 12:04 (083409)

Part of my disability claim with SSD was for my feet problems. I don't
think foot problems alone are enough to get SSD. I worked for 30 years and my SSD is only 1259.00 a month. This is not something to get excited about. If you can relate your foot problems with depression and psychological problems from chronic pain that could go a long way to putting you over the top. Get a psychiatrist to go to bat for you in this regard. What you are trying to do with all disability claims, especially SSD, is to show you cannot do ANY work. The doctors need to say that you are unable to work for at least one year. It also depends on your age. SSD does not like to disable someone who is young because they have to pay for 40 years. There is no benefit to being disabled and on SSD except that you may not starve. Be ready to take a lot of crap from agencies that administer disability payment. I have claims with my disability insurance company, worker's compensation, veterans administration etc. I have been called a liar and fraud more than once. Don't give up! You can get medicare after being on SSD for two years. That is one of the big advantages. You may be entitled to SSI and foodstamps as well. You may never have thought it would come to this but you are disabled and are now in the belly of the beast. SSD usually turns down claimants once or twice. They want you to give up and go back to work regardless if you can or not. This is the American Dream in reverse. If you have dependents you are probably better off on SSD than working some low pay job with crummy benefits. Good luck!

Re: What kind of work can you do with TTS?

BrianG on 5/10/02 at 17:57 (083463)

As someone who is about half way through the SSD determinations, I agree with J. King. Your biggest asset is your doctor. Will he testify that you cannot work for at least a year? Next, you'll need an attorney that speciaizes in disablity law. Lastly, almost all chronic pain will bring on depression. If you haven't talked to your doctor about ths, the time is now. Getting on the right meds is important. Both chronic pain and depression are grounds for SSD. Good luck with your claim.

BrianG

PS: For some ungodly reason, PF is not an allowable condition!!

Re: What kind of work can you do with TTS?

Cheri A on 5/10/02 at 19:29 (083476)

In anticipation of someday not being able to hold down a job because of chronic pain and depression, AND in anticipation of not qualifying for SSD, I have enrolled in a class for medical transcription. I may not be able to maintain current home and lifestyle, but it may keep me going.
I have been on a leave of absence from work for 3 weeks. In one more week, I go back. The pain while I have been off has been better part of the time, I think because I stay off of them a lot and don't wear shoes except houseshoes. My stress level is also better, and that may have helped too.
I just can't get over how hard it is to qualify to be disabled! Chronic pain definitely causes depression, and lessens quality of life. It makes stressful situations more difficult to deal with, and makes it hard to enjoy hobbies and other pursuits of pleasure. I have always wanted to learn to sail, but with not only the pain, but the loss of flexibility in one foot too, I don't feel it would be safe OR enjoyable.
If chronic pain for any reason isn't on SS Admin's list, it sure should be.
I am going to pursue multiple skills that have the possiblity of working at them at home, only because I am more comfortable being in pain at home than on the job. I think that it would be good advice for any of us until
SS learns to recognize our pain as being real, and disabling, to be ready to do what we can in our own interest. Maybe we should network together for work at home projects!

Re: What kind of work can you do with TTS?

eileenc on 5/12/02 at 08:27 (083596)

I am ( 4 more weeks) a high school teacher and am losing my job due to TT. Might want to cross that one off the list.

Re: What kind of work can you do with TTS?

Lara T on 5/12/02 at 11:24 (083619)

I'm so sorry. Off it goes - Some of us can get around more than others, but I'm not sure how much walking is unavoidable in teaching so I imagine your experience is better than mine.

Doing more brainstorming:
musician (probably not rock where you have to get up and gyrate)
medical illustrator
editor

Re: What kind of work can you do with TTS?

paula on 5/12/02 at 11:44 (083620)

i can put more weight on top of my feet than on the bottoms at this point. i am in wheelchair. maybe i can get employment as a bat. do you think batman needs a new assistant? my hero name could be posterior tibial tendon dysunction girl. i could hurl my endless supply of useless orthotics at the bad guys, or at all the medical professionals i've seen so far. more seriously, i feel terrible for all of us in this situation and i can't unerstand why poeple without feet get these great prosthetics that let them run and jump and so many of us just suffer and suffer and spend money on useless orthotics. it makes no sense to me. i am very depressed lately.

Re: What kind of work can you do with TTS?

J. King on 5/12/02 at 12:19 (083622)

Yes, it is very wise to anticipate your possible disability. I anticipated mine by making a worker's compensation claim and by having disability insurance. However, when the disability came it still left me feeling like something washed up on the beach. Going from a working person to a diabled person is traumatic. I had money saved and lots of medical ammunition to go forward with my claims and ,yet, I still am not adjusting to being disabled since I was active and worked for many years. I was partially disabled as a Vietnam Vet and now am totally disabled from work. The problem is that as you age you may gather more injuries than just your feet. I developed a problem with my sholder and neck as well as chronic inflamation of my wrist and forearm. I could not sit and could not stand so out the door I went! Here are a few things you might do now:
1. Save money for the time you will be out of work with no pay. You will need money to pay expense and hire lawyers. Figure on not having an income for at least one year. This is where disabled people really feel the wrath of God since they lose house, car, credit, family, while waiting for SSD or lawsuits to be resolved.
2. Get disability insurance if you can. Not easy but it will pay in the future if you qualify.
3. Pay off debts and don't make new ones
4. Learn as much about disability law as you can.
5. Investigate to see if your company has a disability retirement
6. Get all your medical documentation in order and develop your network of
of doctors who can help you with your claims.

I have been involved in this disability stuff for so long and have seen so many people screwed over that I feel for those who have this dumped in their lap with no preparation. You may be a reasonably healthy person today, but that can all change in an instant. Maybe no one wants to hear this but most of us will be disabled at one time or another.

Re: What kind of work can you do with TTS?

Cheri A on 5/12/02 at 17:58 (083653)

Thank you for your suggestions, they make a lot of sense. Disability has been on my mind a lot lately, and I need to do what I can to be ready.

Re: What kind of work can you do with TTS?

J. King on 5/12/02 at 19:32 (083663)

If you can have some kind of cash flow while waiting to adjust to your disability it can relieve the stress. I don't accept the fact that I will never earn money again, but I will never work a 9-5 job again. If we can just find something to do that we can adjust to our own limitations it is good. The work world will not adjust to us in the employer/employee relationship. I filed many lawsuits regarding discrimination against the disabled and I tell you that most employers want nothing to do with the disabled or injured worker regardless of what their offical statments may be. No one getting disability payments is getting rich. Working is much easier. Good luck!

Re: What kind of work can you do with TTS?

Lara T on 5/09/02 at 20:54 (083304)

I have considered this question and have come up with a few jobs at varying skill levels and salary, that don't require much in the way of feet - depending on your situation. Some of these jobs require some walking which may be more than some on this list can tolerate:

1. mediator (requires 40 - 100 hours of training)
2. receptionist (if you don't have to run the mail around & such - big firms often have one person at the front desk to greet and answer the phone.)
3. court reporter (requires a certificate - about 30-40 hours I think - pays very well)
4. sign language interpreter (again requires certification)
5. telemarketer
6. teaching at the high school level or above - maybe caring for infants -depending on how many infants. A wheel chair could be used part of the day.
7. typist
8. bus driver (don't know the training required)
9. medical stenographer

Well, that's all I've thought of so far. I think it might be useful for many of us to continue this brainstorming as many of us face the same question regardless of whether we are seeking disability or worker's comp, or VESID, etc.

Re: What kind of work can you do with TTS?

Julie on 5/10/02 at 02:05 (083321)

Margie, if the doctor who performed your surgery has said that you are permanently disabled, and is prepared to state this in writing, surely that will go some way towards a successful disability claim?

I like Lara's list (not sure about 'bus driver', though - the feet would have lots of pedal work to do) and agree it's a good idea to think about these possibilities.

Re: What kind of work can you do with TTS?

J. King on 5/10/02 at 12:04 (083409)

Part of my disability claim with SSD was for my feet problems. I don't
think foot problems alone are enough to get SSD. I worked for 30 years and my SSD is only 1259.00 a month. This is not something to get excited about. If you can relate your foot problems with depression and psychological problems from chronic pain that could go a long way to putting you over the top. Get a psychiatrist to go to bat for you in this regard. What you are trying to do with all disability claims, especially SSD, is to show you cannot do ANY work. The doctors need to say that you are unable to work for at least one year. It also depends on your age. SSD does not like to disable someone who is young because they have to pay for 40 years. There is no benefit to being disabled and on SSD except that you may not starve. Be ready to take a lot of crap from agencies that administer disability payment. I have claims with my disability insurance company, worker's compensation, veterans administration etc. I have been called a liar and fraud more than once. Don't give up! You can get medicare after being on SSD for two years. That is one of the big advantages. You may be entitled to SSI and foodstamps as well. You may never have thought it would come to this but you are disabled and are now in the belly of the beast. SSD usually turns down claimants once or twice. They want you to give up and go back to work regardless if you can or not. This is the American Dream in reverse. If you have dependents you are probably better off on SSD than working some low pay job with crummy benefits. Good luck!

Re: What kind of work can you do with TTS?

BrianG on 5/10/02 at 17:57 (083463)

As someone who is about half way through the SSD determinations, I agree with J. King. Your biggest asset is your doctor. Will he testify that you cannot work for at least a year? Next, you'll need an attorney that speciaizes in disablity law. Lastly, almost all chronic pain will bring on depression. If you haven't talked to your doctor about ths, the time is now. Getting on the right meds is important. Both chronic pain and depression are grounds for SSD. Good luck with your claim.

BrianG

PS: For some ungodly reason, PF is not an allowable condition!!

Re: What kind of work can you do with TTS?

Cheri A on 5/10/02 at 19:29 (083476)

In anticipation of someday not being able to hold down a job because of chronic pain and depression, AND in anticipation of not qualifying for SSD, I have enrolled in a class for medical transcription. I may not be able to maintain current home and lifestyle, but it may keep me going.
I have been on a leave of absence from work for 3 weeks. In one more week, I go back. The pain while I have been off has been better part of the time, I think because I stay off of them a lot and don't wear shoes except houseshoes. My stress level is also better, and that may have helped too.
I just can't get over how hard it is to qualify to be disabled! Chronic pain definitely causes depression, and lessens quality of life. It makes stressful situations more difficult to deal with, and makes it hard to enjoy hobbies and other pursuits of pleasure. I have always wanted to learn to sail, but with not only the pain, but the loss of flexibility in one foot too, I don't feel it would be safe OR enjoyable.
If chronic pain for any reason isn't on SS Admin's list, it sure should be.
I am going to pursue multiple skills that have the possiblity of working at them at home, only because I am more comfortable being in pain at home than on the job. I think that it would be good advice for any of us until
SS learns to recognize our pain as being real, and disabling, to be ready to do what we can in our own interest. Maybe we should network together for work at home projects!

Re: What kind of work can you do with TTS?

eileenc on 5/12/02 at 08:27 (083596)

I am ( 4 more weeks) a high school teacher and am losing my job due to TT. Might want to cross that one off the list.

Re: What kind of work can you do with TTS?

Lara T on 5/12/02 at 11:24 (083619)

I'm so sorry. Off it goes - Some of us can get around more than others, but I'm not sure how much walking is unavoidable in teaching so I imagine your experience is better than mine.

Doing more brainstorming:
musician (probably not rock where you have to get up and gyrate)
medical illustrator
editor

Re: What kind of work can you do with TTS?

paula on 5/12/02 at 11:44 (083620)

i can put more weight on top of my feet than on the bottoms at this point. i am in wheelchair. maybe i can get employment as a bat. do you think batman needs a new assistant? my hero name could be posterior tibial tendon dysunction girl. i could hurl my endless supply of useless orthotics at the bad guys, or at all the medical professionals i've seen so far. more seriously, i feel terrible for all of us in this situation and i can't unerstand why poeple without feet get these great prosthetics that let them run and jump and so many of us just suffer and suffer and spend money on useless orthotics. it makes no sense to me. i am very depressed lately.

Re: What kind of work can you do with TTS?

J. King on 5/12/02 at 12:19 (083622)

Yes, it is very wise to anticipate your possible disability. I anticipated mine by making a worker's compensation claim and by having disability insurance. However, when the disability came it still left me feeling like something washed up on the beach. Going from a working person to a diabled person is traumatic. I had money saved and lots of medical ammunition to go forward with my claims and ,yet, I still am not adjusting to being disabled since I was active and worked for many years. I was partially disabled as a Vietnam Vet and now am totally disabled from work. The problem is that as you age you may gather more injuries than just your feet. I developed a problem with my sholder and neck as well as chronic inflamation of my wrist and forearm. I could not sit and could not stand so out the door I went! Here are a few things you might do now:
1. Save money for the time you will be out of work with no pay. You will need money to pay expense and hire lawyers. Figure on not having an income for at least one year. This is where disabled people really feel the wrath of God since they lose house, car, credit, family, while waiting for SSD or lawsuits to be resolved.
2. Get disability insurance if you can. Not easy but it will pay in the future if you qualify.
3. Pay off debts and don't make new ones
4. Learn as much about disability law as you can.
5. Investigate to see if your company has a disability retirement
6. Get all your medical documentation in order and develop your network of
of doctors who can help you with your claims.

I have been involved in this disability stuff for so long and have seen so many people screwed over that I feel for those who have this dumped in their lap with no preparation. You may be a reasonably healthy person today, but that can all change in an instant. Maybe no one wants to hear this but most of us will be disabled at one time or another.

Re: What kind of work can you do with TTS?

Cheri A on 5/12/02 at 17:58 (083653)

Thank you for your suggestions, they make a lot of sense. Disability has been on my mind a lot lately, and I need to do what I can to be ready.

Re: What kind of work can you do with TTS?

J. King on 5/12/02 at 19:32 (083663)

If you can have some kind of cash flow while waiting to adjust to your disability it can relieve the stress. I don't accept the fact that I will never earn money again, but I will never work a 9-5 job again. If we can just find something to do that we can adjust to our own limitations it is good. The work world will not adjust to us in the employer/employee relationship. I filed many lawsuits regarding discrimination against the disabled and I tell you that most employers want nothing to do with the disabled or injured worker regardless of what their offical statments may be. No one getting disability payments is getting rich. Working is much easier. Good luck!