Home The Book Dr Articles Products Message Boards Journal Articles Search Our Surveys Surgery ESWT Dr Messages Find Good Drs video

ART today

Posted by Carmen on 5/10/02 at 18:29 (083471)

WOW did she dig in.
I just clenched my fists and tried to breath deep. My feet hardly hurt ONCE today.
Whatever she is doing helped today.

Re: ART today

Pamela S on 5/10/02 at 19:13 (083473)

Yes, in action ART is painful! But, they do bust up the adhesions and scar-tissue. Sometimes you'll have a bit of tenderness afterwards, but the adhesions being gone really help things. Actually, I think ART practioners must have thumbs of steel.

Re: ART today

Carmen on 5/10/02 at 19:36 (083478)

NO kidding! I was telling her she was strong as an ox.

Re: ART today

Sharon W on 5/10/02 at 22:51 (083497)

Carmen,

Glad to hear it went so well!

-- Sharon

Re: ART today

Ellen J. on 5/13/02 at 09:31 (083692)

I wish I had the courage to try it, but I'm a big chicken these days, afraid to do anything at all for fear that I'll be stuck on the couch another month. So glad this is working, and I'll be interested to hear more if it continues to work. Maybe someday I'll get the courage to try ART.
Ellen

Re: ART today

Pamela S on 5/13/02 at 15:22 (083716)

Try it! Actually, I did alot myself at first to bust up adhesions. I used a hard golf ball and rubbed my heel over it HARD (you could hear the crunchy sound). Also I did alot of self-massage. By the time I went to the ART practioner I had done alot of the 'busting up' myself.

Re: ART today

Carmen on 5/13/02 at 17:42 (083732)

I have heard mixed results on the golf ball...but I am going back to doing it since it is essentially the same thing ART is....
Boy that ART hurts and is not for the low pain threshold people that's for sure.
BUT it doens't hurt like a needle, or curgery or anything. Hurts like a muscle pull...

Re: Whats is ART?

yasmin on 5/16/02 at 11:13 (084151)

Hi i love in London, England, I have been suffering from PF for about a year now, there seems to be a limited amount of treatment here. Can you tell me what is ART?? So I can find out if its done here or not.
Thanks

Re: Whats is ART?

Donna SL on 5/16/02 at 12:25 (084158)

Hi Yasmin,

The chiropractor Dr. Leahy who is the founder of the Active Release Technique (ART) hasn't taught any seminars in the UK yet, so it is not that popular there at this time. He's taught in Hong Kong, Australia, and Canada, and of course all over the US. I was told he attends all the seminars personally. I'm hoping he'll eventually get to the UK, because I will be moving there myself in the future.

My doctor who practices ART here said at the last few ART seminars in California he has noticed some chiros from the UK that came here to study ART. I'm sure there have been many other practitioners from the UK that have attended the seminars in other cities.

If you email, or call the ART institue

http://www.activerelease.com/

Maybe they could help locate the chiros in the UK that took the course. Also, make sure to ask if they are certified in lower body ART, because that is very important. Just look under 'Contact us' at the top right hand corner of the web page.

The institute can also mail you additional information on ART if you request it. There's a little info on the web site. Also, if you do a search on either 'ART', 'Active release therapy', or 'Active release technique' on the Heel spurs board you'll find some info. I posted a lot about around April 01.

Donna

Re: Whats is ART?

yasmin on 5/16/02 at 16:49 (084196)

Donna
Thanks for that! It can get quite exhausting trying to find people that will be able to help you with this problem. Have you taken ART? Has it worked at all for you?
Yasmin

Re: Whats is ART?

Donna SL on 5/16/02 at 22:00 (084240)

Hi Yasmin,

Art was extremely helpful for me. I was nearly crippled before I started. I had tarsal tunnel syndrome, and PF. I had acupuncture which was a great help too, and also had an excellent topical cream made up by a compound pharmacist. (chemist). These aren't overnight quick cures, and I went for many treatments for close to a year, and am probably 80-95% better now. I had a lot of nerve injuries that are still healing. I still have ups, and downs, but I am seeing continuous improvement, and still go for occassional treatments.

Please let me know if you find an ART practitioner there.
If you can't then try to find someone very experienced, and certified in myofascial release, and foot problems. It would be the second best to ART. It might not be quite as effective, or work as fast, but it will help, because ART is a fancy form of myofascial release with certain movements. There's also an older therapy around called MRT which is sort of a gruff, and unrefined ART method, but it may help too if you find an MRT practitioner. My chiro used to do MRT before ART was available.

I don't know if this will help, but I had posted some non ART related info in a post on the HS board a while back for foot resources in the UK.

bbv.cgi?n=80355

BTW I have a niece in the UK named Yasmin.

Donna

Re: Whats is ART?

yasmin on 5/17/02 at 16:54 (084359)

Thanks for that information Donna, its all very useful.

I have had PF for about a year now, I wasn't diagonised until six months after I got it, and received treatment seven months later. I received steroid shots and this has helped, but not a lot, as I still get very sore and achey for weeks. I feel like that now, but thanks to the advice on this website, I've strted icing and using ibropfen cream and this seems to be helping now. When I saw the docter treating me last week, he said he couldn't help me anymore and I had to learn to live with the condition. But I can't accept that, so I've strted to research into other ways of treating PF and trying to find experts on the topic.

It can get really depressing, especially on sunny days when you want to go for a long stroll in the park, but you just can't. I ve got a 2 year old and am doing a course so it is tough, but I try to be positive.

You mentioned something about a compound mix, is there a name for this, or do I need to see a specialist for it?

Its nice talking to you! I don't know anyone who suffers from PF, so when I've been in tears over this, my friends seem to think I'am being 'over the top!'

Thanks again for the info, yasmin

Re: Yasmin

Donna SL on 5/18/02 at 15:18 (084459)

Hi Yasmin,

It's nice communicating with you too.

It seems that many doctors don't know how to treat soft tissue injuries of the feet, etc. except maybe some good podiatrist, so most just brush you off, and tell you that you must live with this. There can be limited treatment in the US too if you're not lucky to find the right doctors straight away. I had gone to many doctors that weren't even interested in foot pain, and didn't take it seriously. It took almost two years to get diagnosed with tarsal tunnel syndrome, which was partly from the help of this web site which led me in the right direction to get a proper diagnosis. Several podiatrist had thought I had only PF. and said that there wasn't much that could be done. The TTS was never addressed, and treated, because I didn't know I had it. Even for the PF I was recommended very limited treatment options.

I've learned you have to be proactive in your treatment plan. When I was told I had TTS for example the only traditional option offered to me was either cortisone shots which I refused, and if that didn't work then surgery. The podiatrist that diagnosed me last year with TTS laughed at me when I told him I wanted to try ART first. I had read that nerve entrapment, TTS, PF etc., can be caused by adhesions from trauma, repetitive strain injuries, etc., so I did some research on conservative methods for this, and that's how I came across ART, and acupuncture. I first started with a chiropractor for the ART treatments, and than added additional therapy.

I found a good physiatrist (an md specializing in physical medicine, and rehab), and he directed most of my medical treatment. He performed acupuncture, and prescribed various medications both oral, and topical to calm the irritated nerves down. He explained that after so many years of chronic pain the nerves can overfire, and become overly sensitive, and the pain can even become centralized.

That's why in chronic pain situations whether it's PF, tarsal tunnel, etc., a multi-care approach to pain is sometimes needed. It was the combination of the ART, acupuncture, various meds, and even pilates to strengthen weakened muscles that got me to the stage I'm in now.

You may need for example someone experienced in chronic pain to prescribe the topical cream I had. It could be from a doctor specializing in chronic pain, a neurologist, physiatrist, etc. I also had taken oral meds like vioxx, nortriptyline, and neurontin for close to a year, which I'm off of now. I still use the cream occassionaly. It has a combination of both anti-inflammatories, and nerve pain meds. It consistes of 10% ketamine, ketoprophen, gabapentin, (neurontin), clonidine, all in a plo gel ibupropen base. This is a stronger PLO base to drive the meds through thicker foot skin. The regular plo's are not always powerful enough. You might not need all the medications that I had in mine. That's why it's important to find someone who has a background in pain mgt. I was fortunate my physiatrist had that experience, yet he worked along with a pharmacist to create this for me.

Regardless any topical cream can be made up by a compound pharmacist from a prescription from a doctor. Pharmacist also know the best base to put the cream into so it penetrates into the skin. (PLO bases). You just have to find someone who knows what to prescribe depending on your needs, and it will probably be a pain mgt doctor experienced in pharmacology. I've seen some good UK pain mgt sites on the web in the past, but can't recall them at them moment. If you do a search on 'pain management UK' for example some may come up. If I come across any, I'll post them.

Sometimes there is no easy solution to curing a foot problem, and it may take a lot of various resources to get better. It could possibly take a combination of things like ART, acupuncture, medication, orthotics, ESWT, other forms of physical therapy, surgery (last resort) etc. to cure it. Sometimes it's as simple as getting the proper shoes, rest, time, and following the conservative methods listed on the HS board. Has anyone advised you on proper shoes for this?

I know this is tough especially with having a 2 year old, but the sooner you try different treatments the better. The more chronic the condition becomes the harder it is to get rid of.

The most important thing is get a clear diagnosis of what is causing your pain, and make absolutely sure you only have PF. I don't know if you have had any x-rays, MRI's, ultra-sounds, nerve conduction studies to rule out nerve problems like TTS, etc. If you just a traditional case of PF, and follow the conservative methods hopefully it will resolve itself in a short time. Also ESWT might help if methods like ART, and acupunture, etc. fail. Try to not have any more cortisone shots.

People that don't suffer from foot pain just can't understand how devasting in can be. That's why this board is so great. You realize you are not alone. From what I've seen the UK has a lot of resources, and it's just a matter of getting to the right people to help you. This is the case in the US, or anywhere. There are many fine podiatry schools, and probably more alternative treatments available in the UK then the US.

Donna

Re: Hi Donna

yasmin on 5/18/02 at 17:16 (084476)

Thanks for mailing me back.

I haven't has any x-rays or anything of that sort. The docter asked me what my symptoms were, checked my right foot and told me I had PF - thats all! But readig up on PF confirms that I do have it. I think it would be a good idea to go a foot clinic that is near to where I live. As to regards to footwear, the only thing I've been wearing is trainers, and they seem fine, they do the job, I can't wear anything else right now. AM seriously thinking about getting some more comfortable shoes, actually I keeping a store called 'Birks', I think I may find out about mail order and gets some insoles from them.

It seems that most people do get better or get some sort relief as time goes by, so I am trying to stay positive, but I find it really hard, especially when I see gorgeous high heeled shoes, and know I won't be wearing them for a very long time.

Actually the clinic I am thinking about going to talked about a treatment called 'reflectron'??????, the advert said it has been used in the states successfully? Have you heard of it?

Keep in touch!

Yasmin

Re: Hi Yasmin

Donna SL on 5/18/02 at 18:18 (084488)

Hi Yasmin

The reflectron is just a smaller version of the Ossatron that's used in the states. ESWT, esp Ossatron has been done a lot longer in Europe than here. Is the name of the clinic you are thinking of called the Oving clinic in Chichester? I think there may be others now that have it in London though.

http://www.ovingclinic.co.uk/index.html

This is one of the links I mentioned in the previous post on uK resources.

If you are thinking of Chelsea physio I don't know how much experience he has in it, if it is the person I'm thinking of. He's a PT not a orthopedic md, or podiatrist. I spoke with him last spring. I think you would be better off going to the Oving clinic even if it requires a little more traveling unless you find a podiatrist, or orthopedic md in London performing it. Some people who wrote in on the board had success with Orving. I think the ESWT is performed by an md/orthopod. The cost is very reasonable.

Also, there are all kinds of trainers, and some may not be supportive enough for PF, so it's important to be wearing the proper ones for your foot type. If they are too soft in the heel, for example Nike air, they may cause more strain on the heel, and pf. There are plenty of trainers around that do not have sufficient midfoot support. Which ones are you wearing?

I know what you mean about wearing nice looking shoes let alone gorgeous high heels. I wore my trainers every where when I was in London a couple of years ago. I wouldn't have been able to walk otherwise. I think London is a lot more conservative than California, and I felt like I was getting negative stares even in casual restaurants, stores, real estate offices, etc., in certain neighborhoods. Maybe it was my imagination sometimes, but there were times that I wasn't able to walk into cetain places with trainers on that would have been perfectly acceptable here. Sometimes I would carry regular shoes with me, and change before going into certain places. I'm not talking about a Saturday night fancy dinner, just average restaurants during the week. Sneakers (trainers) seem to be more acceptable for street wear in the US. I used to see women walking around Hyde Park in little sandals, and wondered how the heck they did it. Hope things change when I move there. Ha. Ha.

Donna

Re: Hi Donna

Yasmin on 5/19/02 at 18:23 (084601)

Hi ya, how r u?

The clinic is called http://fitter feet for life.co.uk. Why don't u check them out? They seem impressive. Actually I'm worried about seeing them - because of what they may find!! I don't want to go for the reflectron just yet, I think I would prefer to have some physio on it and learn some strengtening exercises instead, I believe this clinic has a physiotherapist there that maybe able to help me with the exercises.

My trainers are actually nike, and have an air bubble!! But I find them very comfortable!!

I wear my trainers everywhere, but I haven't had any problems with anyone giving me any negative stares!! (Well I haven't noticed anyway!) But I wouldn't care anyway because its me that suffers from heel pain not them.

I used to wear sandals and high heeled boots everywhere before PF, thats why I have it, I didn't think twice about it, and I really regret the day I got PF. I remember it was sunny and bright, and I decided to take Cameron (my son)to the park to meet some friends, I did think about wearing trainers, but I was fed up with them because I had been wearing them for the past few weeks, so I opted for my high heeled boots...and here I am now!!!!

How did you get PF?

I tried looking for pain management centres in the UK, and wasn't very successful. I'll try again tomorrow. By the way do u work, Donna?

Talk to u soon.

Yasmin

Re: Hi Yasmin

Donna SL on 5/20/02 at 03:43 (084644)

Hi Yasmin,

How are you today?

I looked at the Fitterfeet web site. Had to take a space out to get link to work

http://www.fitterfeetforlife.co.uk/

It seems very professional and interesting. I like that they do a computerized gait analysis, and have the in shoe scanner. Also, they seem to have a sports medicine background, and probably see a lot of PF. Don't be afraid to go to them. I'm sure there is nothing major wrong with your feet. You have the right idea about the Reflectron for now. If anything they may be able to advise you if you are in the right shoe, and if you have any really severe gait problems. They may also be able to suggest other forms of physio, and exercises as you mentioned.

Also, if you haven't done this already TAPING your feet daily while they heal can help you immensely, and hopefully they will show you how to do that properly. I would still suggest looking into therapies like ART, or some form of myofascial release, acupuncture, etc., even if they don't mention it. Most pods won't. Also physio, etc. on areas other then your feet like your calves (important), hamstrings, shins, etc. can help your pf.

Don't worry about minor gait problems though. Many people have imperfect biomechanics, and don't have PF, so I wouldn't let them sell you a pair of orthotics so fast. If you went without orthotics all your life than various methods of rehab should get you back on track. Unless you have really gross biomechanics orthotics can sometimes cause more problems then they are worth. What would be good is if they could tell you if you over pronated, or over supinated, what kind of foot type you had, etc.. This would help in making sure you are in the right trainer to help you heal. Ask them for shoe suggestions, and if they would observe your gait in various models.

Nike in general aren't a very stable shoe, unless you are in one of their motion control shoes, which are just so-so motion control shoes. If you have high arches, or a pretty neutral gait you wouldn't want to be in a motion control shoe anyway, but you would still want to be in a neutral stable shoe. Most of the Nikes have poor mid-foot support. Also, the Air in the heel is not the greatest for PF, and can cause the heel to move around to much. Nike isn't the only trainer that isn't that stable, and you have to be very selective with choosing any trainer. There are some lousy New Balance, Asics, Adidas, etc. models, but I think Nike, and Reebok are the worse for having the majority of their shoes with poor midfoot support, and torsional instability.

Hopefully this clinic would be knowledgable about shoes. Most of the podiatrist I had gone to in the past never advised me on shoes. It wasn't until I found this podiatrist who specialized in biomechanics who taught me about proper shoes, and watched me walk in various models did I realize what was right for my foot type. I thought the Nike model I was wearing was the greatest, yet I had foot pain, and when I listened to this doc, and got different shoes I started to feel better. Not all Nikes are bad, but you have to be careful in finding the few decent ones they, and most other athletic manufactures make.

It's important though that whatever you pick doesn't bend in the midfoot when you hold the heel in one hand, and push from the toes hard. The shoe should only bend where the toes bend. There is some other criteria, but a good podiatrist should show you how to test for torsional stability, support, etc.. There are more bad then good shoes on the market.

I actually got PF, and eventually TTS from having my biomechancis mis-diagnosed by a podiatrist, and then being put in the WRONG orthotics, and shoes. I was told I over-pronated, and was put in anti-pronation shoes, and inverted orthotics (rolled my feet out more) when in fact I have high arches, and over-supinate (roll my feet out too much). I realize now that the pod was either blind, or stupid, or both. I was fine before that except for some minor forefoot discomfort, but this combo put so much strain on my foot structures, and lower extremities. I was too ignorant at the time to realize this was causing the pain. I started to improve even before I started treatment after I went to a different podiatrist, and he recognized this, and had me get out of the orthotics, and the particular trainers I was in.

That's why it's important that you get a good biomechanics eval. You have to ask whomever evaluates you how extensive their training has been in biomechanics. Not every podiatrist has this background. Even then they can make mistakes. Sometimes just switching to the right shoe can put you on the road to recovery. Ironically the new pod said I never really needed orthotics in the first place, except for maybe an accommodative cushioned one, but the right shoe should be enough. This is coming from a world renowned pod who invented a technique for orthotics used internationally, and who's entire practice is only biomechanics, and orthotics. Yet he's done everything to discourage me from wearing orthotics.

I'm so glad you said that about the trainers, and the stares. I had the worse problems in areas like Chelsea, and some similar areas. My husband, and I were looking for properties, and I had some problems in the RE offices, some stores, and restaurants there. I also was not able to walk in the Ritz Hotel lobby in the afternoon. I wasn't there for tea. I just wanted to take some video pictures, and they wouldn't let me in the door with trainers on. Even in a couple of average restaurants we went into in other areas during the week the employees (host/owners?) made some snide remarks when I left about my trainers.

My husband's attitude is like yours, and he says I shouldn't care, but when they sit you in the outside seating area in a restaurant when there is room inside, or refuse entry into a hotel lobby in the afternoon, I find that upsetting. We were dressed nicely otherwise. I told my husband I won't live in any area that has that attitude. Areas like Picadilly Circus, Convent Gardens, Oxford street area, etc., were more lenient. A young college girl I know just got back from London, and had similar experiences. I guess I'll just learn to ignore things, and stay out of places like the Ritz, and Chelsea. Ha Ha.

I haven't had a chance to look much myself, but I remember a particular pain mgt society in the UK. When I have a chance I'll look again.
Try putting 'pain management' UK ( Keep the UK out of quotes). Or just plug in 'pain managment', and you'll find tons of societies, organizations, etc., which include resource links. This is just a start, but below is a list of internet resoures from the American Academy of Pain mgt of almost all the pain mgt links, and most list links to other countries. You may have to go into each listing, and look for international links. Usually check under 'resources'

http://www.painmed.org/netresources/

main page address to aapm
http://www.painmed.org/

Phew! I know this seems like a lot of work, so also ask doctors, and other health professionals if they know of doctors in this field.

I'm not working at the moment. Thank goodness. I think getting better has been a full time job in itself, and don't know if I would have been able to do it if I was. Are you working? I'll bet taking care of your little son, and having PF must be a handful. I admire you for that.

Hope I didn't bore you with the long winded shoe info, but sometimes that can be one of the most important components in curing PF.

Donna

Re: Hi Yasmin

paula on 5/20/02 at 09:37 (084657)

what are trainers?

Re: Hi Yasmin

yasmin on 5/20/02 at 15:45 (084692)

Hi Paula

In the UK we call sneakers, trainers!!

Yasmin

Re: Hi Donna

yasmin on 5/20/02 at 16:27 (084694)

Hi Donna

Thanks again for all the information, its all really helpful, you've done you're research really well!

I think you're right about the trainers, because if I walk more than 5-10 minutes I get aches and pains in my arche and my heel starts to get really sore. Whats orthotics?? I keep hearing that word on the discussion board. I still haven't made an appointment with that clinic, I am really paranoid to what they may say to me, like 'it's too late, theres nothing we can do for you!'. I think the last docter has made me paranoid. I know it would benefit me a lot to go as soon as possible.

I am not working, I am doing a Masters degree in Information Science, I ve just finished my finals, but still have lectures to attend. I have to do two reports, and five essays and a presentation in five weeks!! Its really hard work, especially if you have a toddler to look after. I tend to do my work in the evening when he goes to sleep. But to tell you the truth I feel really exhausted right now, I really don't want to. I have lectures tomorrow, and am worried about the long walk from teh tube station to university. But I have to go because I have arrange the presentation with a few other students, otherwise I would of made my excuses and stayed at home.

My foot is aching and feeling sore right now because I've been standing in the kitchen making dinner in my slippers!!!

Before I go to bed I am going to put some ice on it, that does help. What type of shoes to you wear around the house?? I have learnt so much since last week when I found this website (and you!), and having the right shoes is so vital, I really want to get over this. The restrictions are so depressing. My husband just cut the grass in the garden so I can sit out there with Cameron on sunny days instead of going to the park. I feel really gulity sometimes because I can't take him out as often as I like, but my friend keeps telling me that as long as he has love and attention Cameron will be happy.

When did you come London? I suppose some areas in Chelsea will be fussy when it comes to footwear, but I think most places are fine. Don't worry too much about it, hopefully you'll be 100% better when me to London. What does you're husband do, and what would you like to do when you're here?

It's really tough having young children when you have PF. I want to have more but I know its gonna be really hard with PF, if I am pregnant, as you can't take any painkillers.

Its raining heavily outside, its 10.30pm and I have an urge to eat a chocolate cookie!! So thats what I'm gonna do!

I hope my foot is okay for tomorrow, I wish I could take the ice with me.

How's your foot/feet?? I hope you get better soon.

Talk to u tomorrow!

yasmin

Re: Paula

yasmin on 5/20/02 at 16:42 (084696)

Hi paula

In the UK we call sneakers, trainers!!

Yasmin

Re: Yasmin - Hope your feet hold up today

Donna SL on 5/21/02 at 04:58 (084745)

Hi Yasmin,

Hope you enjoyed that chocolate cookie. It's raining here tonight too in San Francisco. That's unusual for this time of the year. It rarely rains at all here except maybe a couple of weeks in the winter time. It's such a big thing when it rains here, and they were making a big deal of it on the news tonight.

Orthotics are like arch supports, but they do much more than that. They help correct any biomechanical problems. They can be temporary, or permanent devices depending on your problem. When you have PF it helps to stabilize the foot, so it can heal. This can be done with orthotics, or tape. Tape is probably the best thing.

Also a small heel lift maybe only 1/16 of an inch inserted under the insert in your trainers above the heel cushion could take a lot of stress off your fascia. Your foot wouldn't sink into the air pocket in the shoe as much, and this would relieve strain on the fascia. You wouldn't believe how much a small lift can do. I wear them in all trainers. It has to be a firm rubber type heel lift, or birko cork type material not some soft gel type thing. It would be best if a podiatrist gave this to you.

Also Tuli heel cups might help. If you do a search on Tuli Heel cups you'll find tons of them on the web. They give your heel a good lift, and may stabiize it a bit. Also, some people have found relief with viscoe spots heel pads. I didn't like them because they were posted a bit too much on the medial side, and felt too soft to me. Hopefully the podiatrist at this clinic would be familiar with all these, but if not you can order them off the web. I think the pale yellow ones (tuli) might be the best for pf. I just picked one web site that had them, but there are many others.

http://www.orthomedicalsupplies.com/Merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=oms&Product_Code=10010&Category_Code=t

all tuli heel cups
http://www.orthomedicalsupplies.com/Merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=oms&Category_Code=t

The above came from this website that shows a lot of products

http://www.orthomedicalsupplies.com/Merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=SFNT&Store_Code=oms

At home I either wear a firm slip on platform type sandal, or a clog type of shoe. I probably wouldn't be able to walk outside in them, but they work well for standing around, and walking slow at home. It gives the foot a rest with the extra support. Bedroom slippers tend to be too soft. You don't have to spend a lot. As long as they are raised somewhat in the heel, and have a firm midfoot, and maybe some extra cushion on the foot bed. Sketcher type sandals, or cheaper no brand names of a similar type would be fine. Even some men's sandals work well, because they are wider, and work with thick socks. Open, or closed backs are fine.

We were in London about 1 1/2 years ago for a couple of weeks. I've been there several times before that. My husband's sister was getting married. up in Scotland, where is parents live now, so we spent some time there too. If we have time we'll go back sometimes this summer, or early fall.

This may sound silly, but maybe if you have a cold pack bag you could bring a small coke bottle filled with frozen water, and take it out if needed. You just roll your foot over it, or keep it on the PF area. Maybe go into a small lounge area somewhere. It doesn't melt that fast in the plastic bottle, and would stay cold for hours. The other option is just get some ice from an ice machine, and put it in a plastic bag.

It's nice that you have a garden. What part of London do you live in? Pregnancy would be tough on PF, because of the extra weight. Hopefully you'll knock it out very soon, so you can continue with your family.

The important thing is to get as much treatment as you can now. I'm sure you're not a hopeless case, and your pf is still in the early stages. What can hurt you is waiting to get additional treatment, because as I mentioned before the more chronic it becomes the more difficult it is to get rid of. Also, a chronic pain situation can occur, with literaly changes to the nervous system the longer pain itself is left untreated. The pain sort of spreads. A stronger pain killer like ultram might be of benefit. Also the nerves in the foot get irritated from PF, and drugs like neurontin can help calm pain down too. All these medications including an anti-inflammatories can be taken together if necessary.

My feet have felt the best they have in a long time this past month, or so. I've been standing, and walking much more then I have in a long time. Sometimes my PF gets a little irritated, but I have little, or none of the horrible foot nerve pain from tarsal tunnel syndrome lately. I got a little over confident tonight, and spent close to an hour exercising on a statonary bike, and Nordic track, and my ankles are a bit sore around the TT area. I hope I didn't hurt anything. Swimming is the best, but I haven't been in the mood lately to swim. That was the only form of exercise I could do for the longest time, except for some light cycling.

My husband owns a computer softwear and consulting business. As for me I would love to do something to help people with foot pain. I would like to open up some type of foot comfort store which would include shoes, OTC devices, etc. The commercial rents in London are probably a fortune though. My pod says I should go to podiatry school, but I don't know if I could take going back to school again. I really have to think about it. I have a BS degree in business, and my background has been mainly in computer science, so I would have to start from scratch, and do all the pre med type courses before I could even start pod school. I've also thought of studying physical therapy, and specializing in foot problems, but again it would require much more schooling. I'm just so sick of the computer business, and want to do something to help people with feet problems.

Yasmin do you have an email address I could write you at? I could still write to you here if you like, but I'd love to talk in more detail about feet, and other things that aren't part of the treatment section.

I hope your feet feel a little better today.

Donna

Re: Hi Donna

yasmin on 5/21/02 at 10:42 (084764)

Hi ya

My email address is (email removed). That'll be cool if u could write to me there! This thread is getting too long!

I came home early roday, I was in quite a lot of discomfort in the morning, but decided to go in anyway because I've been 'kinda shoved' into being the leader of the presentation group (I didn't ask for it but no one was communicating with each other expect with me). I really didn't want to go because my heel felt sore, and Cameron was being difficult demanding me to put on Bob the Builder (children's TV character), I was sooooo stressed, and had to ask my mum to come and collect him (she looks after him when I go to uni). I then decided to get a cab to the station from my house. By the time I got to uni, my heel seemed a little better, but then later it started to ache and hurt, and I couldn't concentrate on what was happening in the lecture, all I wanted was ice, and lots of it and I felt mad at the docter who treated me and at myself for wearing those heels etc etc. So I left, I felt gulity, because I need to get some reading material in order to complete the assignments, but I couldn't bear the thought of walking around the library looking for books, so I just went home.

I feel really miserable actually, I think its just a bad day. When of the students was trying to convince to go to a university ball, and I was trying to explain to her I wouldn't be able to, because I can't wear heels. So that annoyed me, because I can't do anything right now!!!!!!

I brought some tape, so I could give taping a try, by consulting the heel book of this website, is that a good idea?

Also that section on injections on this website has made feel really scared.

Oh someones at the door, I'll talk to u later

bye

Re: Hi Donna

yasmin on 5/21/02 at 16:59 (084790)

Hi Donna

I am definately having a really bad day. My foot has been soooo sore all day, and now I am beginning to get twinges of pain. I've been so upset, I burst into tears in front of Cameron, who didn't know what to do!

Its just I have so many dreams like, I wanted to have more children, start a placement in a company to complete my dissertation, go out shopping, to the beach etc etc etc..

Right now the way I feel I don't feel that will ever be achievable. Do u think its true that once u get PF, u have it for life and have to always take care of that injury??

God I am depressed!!!

I going to make that appointment with Fitter Feet tomorrow.
Yasmin

Re: Yasmin - Don't worry

Donna SL on 5/21/02 at 17:38 (084793)

Hi Yasmin,

Please believe me that you will get better. I was in terrible shape last year, and never thought I would get to the improved stage I'm at now. I can understand your fears, and frustrations, but try to stay calm. I know how hard that is at the time you are feeling this way, but trust me you will be able to do all the things you want again. I couldn't even go grocery shopping last year, and now I stand in the stores for hours. I think I do it on purpose, and stay out until the cows come home, because I can't believe it myself yet.

I wrote you an email a little over hour ago. Did you get it? I'm glad you made that appointment with Fitter Feet.

Donna

Re: Hey Donna!

yasmin on 5/21/02 at 17:58 (084794)

Yeah I have received your email, thanks. I ve just mailed you back. Thanks for your mail of encouragement. I think its quite hard to find people to help with PF here, maybe its just trail and error, but it does seem a really long road. I am going to make that appointment tomorrow!
Its brilliant that you're feet much better, the only way is up now!
yasmin

Re: ART today

Pamela S on 5/10/02 at 19:13 (083473)

Yes, in action ART is painful! But, they do bust up the adhesions and scar-tissue. Sometimes you'll have a bit of tenderness afterwards, but the adhesions being gone really help things. Actually, I think ART practioners must have thumbs of steel.

Re: ART today

Carmen on 5/10/02 at 19:36 (083478)

NO kidding! I was telling her she was strong as an ox.

Re: ART today

Sharon W on 5/10/02 at 22:51 (083497)

Carmen,

Glad to hear it went so well!

-- Sharon

Re: ART today

Ellen J. on 5/13/02 at 09:31 (083692)

I wish I had the courage to try it, but I'm a big chicken these days, afraid to do anything at all for fear that I'll be stuck on the couch another month. So glad this is working, and I'll be interested to hear more if it continues to work. Maybe someday I'll get the courage to try ART.
Ellen

Re: ART today

Pamela S on 5/13/02 at 15:22 (083716)

Try it! Actually, I did alot myself at first to bust up adhesions. I used a hard golf ball and rubbed my heel over it HARD (you could hear the crunchy sound). Also I did alot of self-massage. By the time I went to the ART practioner I had done alot of the 'busting up' myself.

Re: ART today

Carmen on 5/13/02 at 17:42 (083732)

I have heard mixed results on the golf ball...but I am going back to doing it since it is essentially the same thing ART is....
Boy that ART hurts and is not for the low pain threshold people that's for sure.
BUT it doens't hurt like a needle, or curgery or anything. Hurts like a muscle pull...

Re: Whats is ART?

yasmin on 5/16/02 at 11:13 (084151)

Hi i love in London, England, I have been suffering from PF for about a year now, there seems to be a limited amount of treatment here. Can you tell me what is ART?? So I can find out if its done here or not.
Thanks

Re: Whats is ART?

Donna SL on 5/16/02 at 12:25 (084158)

Hi Yasmin,

The chiropractor Dr. Leahy who is the founder of the Active Release Technique (ART) hasn't taught any seminars in the UK yet, so it is not that popular there at this time. He's taught in Hong Kong, Australia, and Canada, and of course all over the US. I was told he attends all the seminars personally. I'm hoping he'll eventually get to the UK, because I will be moving there myself in the future.

My doctor who practices ART here said at the last few ART seminars in California he has noticed some chiros from the UK that came here to study ART. I'm sure there have been many other practitioners from the UK that have attended the seminars in other cities.

If you email, or call the ART institue

http://www.activerelease.com/

Maybe they could help locate the chiros in the UK that took the course. Also, make sure to ask if they are certified in lower body ART, because that is very important. Just look under 'Contact us' at the top right hand corner of the web page.

The institute can also mail you additional information on ART if you request it. There's a little info on the web site. Also, if you do a search on either 'ART', 'Active release therapy', or 'Active release technique' on the Heel spurs board you'll find some info. I posted a lot about around April 01.

Donna

Re: Whats is ART?

yasmin on 5/16/02 at 16:49 (084196)

Donna
Thanks for that! It can get quite exhausting trying to find people that will be able to help you with this problem. Have you taken ART? Has it worked at all for you?
Yasmin

Re: Whats is ART?

Donna SL on 5/16/02 at 22:00 (084240)

Hi Yasmin,

Art was extremely helpful for me. I was nearly crippled before I started. I had tarsal tunnel syndrome, and PF. I had acupuncture which was a great help too, and also had an excellent topical cream made up by a compound pharmacist. (chemist). These aren't overnight quick cures, and I went for many treatments for close to a year, and am probably 80-95% better now. I had a lot of nerve injuries that are still healing. I still have ups, and downs, but I am seeing continuous improvement, and still go for occassional treatments.

Please let me know if you find an ART practitioner there.
If you can't then try to find someone very experienced, and certified in myofascial release, and foot problems. It would be the second best to ART. It might not be quite as effective, or work as fast, but it will help, because ART is a fancy form of myofascial release with certain movements. There's also an older therapy around called MRT which is sort of a gruff, and unrefined ART method, but it may help too if you find an MRT practitioner. My chiro used to do MRT before ART was available.

I don't know if this will help, but I had posted some non ART related info in a post on the HS board a while back for foot resources in the UK.

bbv.cgi?n=80355

BTW I have a niece in the UK named Yasmin.

Donna

Re: Whats is ART?

yasmin on 5/17/02 at 16:54 (084359)

Thanks for that information Donna, its all very useful.

I have had PF for about a year now, I wasn't diagonised until six months after I got it, and received treatment seven months later. I received steroid shots and this has helped, but not a lot, as I still get very sore and achey for weeks. I feel like that now, but thanks to the advice on this website, I've strted icing and using ibropfen cream and this seems to be helping now. When I saw the docter treating me last week, he said he couldn't help me anymore and I had to learn to live with the condition. But I can't accept that, so I've strted to research into other ways of treating PF and trying to find experts on the topic.

It can get really depressing, especially on sunny days when you want to go for a long stroll in the park, but you just can't. I ve got a 2 year old and am doing a course so it is tough, but I try to be positive.

You mentioned something about a compound mix, is there a name for this, or do I need to see a specialist for it?

Its nice talking to you! I don't know anyone who suffers from PF, so when I've been in tears over this, my friends seem to think I'am being 'over the top!'

Thanks again for the info, yasmin

Re: Yasmin

Donna SL on 5/18/02 at 15:18 (084459)

Hi Yasmin,

It's nice communicating with you too.

It seems that many doctors don't know how to treat soft tissue injuries of the feet, etc. except maybe some good podiatrist, so most just brush you off, and tell you that you must live with this. There can be limited treatment in the US too if you're not lucky to find the right doctors straight away. I had gone to many doctors that weren't even interested in foot pain, and didn't take it seriously. It took almost two years to get diagnosed with tarsal tunnel syndrome, which was partly from the help of this web site which led me in the right direction to get a proper diagnosis. Several podiatrist had thought I had only PF. and said that there wasn't much that could be done. The TTS was never addressed, and treated, because I didn't know I had it. Even for the PF I was recommended very limited treatment options.

I've learned you have to be proactive in your treatment plan. When I was told I had TTS for example the only traditional option offered to me was either cortisone shots which I refused, and if that didn't work then surgery. The podiatrist that diagnosed me last year with TTS laughed at me when I told him I wanted to try ART first. I had read that nerve entrapment, TTS, PF etc., can be caused by adhesions from trauma, repetitive strain injuries, etc., so I did some research on conservative methods for this, and that's how I came across ART, and acupuncture. I first started with a chiropractor for the ART treatments, and than added additional therapy.

I found a good physiatrist (an md specializing in physical medicine, and rehab), and he directed most of my medical treatment. He performed acupuncture, and prescribed various medications both oral, and topical to calm the irritated nerves down. He explained that after so many years of chronic pain the nerves can overfire, and become overly sensitive, and the pain can even become centralized.

That's why in chronic pain situations whether it's PF, tarsal tunnel, etc., a multi-care approach to pain is sometimes needed. It was the combination of the ART, acupuncture, various meds, and even pilates to strengthen weakened muscles that got me to the stage I'm in now.

You may need for example someone experienced in chronic pain to prescribe the topical cream I had. It could be from a doctor specializing in chronic pain, a neurologist, physiatrist, etc. I also had taken oral meds like vioxx, nortriptyline, and neurontin for close to a year, which I'm off of now. I still use the cream occassionaly. It has a combination of both anti-inflammatories, and nerve pain meds. It consistes of 10% ketamine, ketoprophen, gabapentin, (neurontin), clonidine, all in a plo gel ibupropen base. This is a stronger PLO base to drive the meds through thicker foot skin. The regular plo's are not always powerful enough. You might not need all the medications that I had in mine. That's why it's important to find someone who has a background in pain mgt. I was fortunate my physiatrist had that experience, yet he worked along with a pharmacist to create this for me.

Regardless any topical cream can be made up by a compound pharmacist from a prescription from a doctor. Pharmacist also know the best base to put the cream into so it penetrates into the skin. (PLO bases). You just have to find someone who knows what to prescribe depending on your needs, and it will probably be a pain mgt doctor experienced in pharmacology. I've seen some good UK pain mgt sites on the web in the past, but can't recall them at them moment. If you do a search on 'pain management UK' for example some may come up. If I come across any, I'll post them.

Sometimes there is no easy solution to curing a foot problem, and it may take a lot of various resources to get better. It could possibly take a combination of things like ART, acupuncture, medication, orthotics, ESWT, other forms of physical therapy, surgery (last resort) etc. to cure it. Sometimes it's as simple as getting the proper shoes, rest, time, and following the conservative methods listed on the HS board. Has anyone advised you on proper shoes for this?

I know this is tough especially with having a 2 year old, but the sooner you try different treatments the better. The more chronic the condition becomes the harder it is to get rid of.

The most important thing is get a clear diagnosis of what is causing your pain, and make absolutely sure you only have PF. I don't know if you have had any x-rays, MRI's, ultra-sounds, nerve conduction studies to rule out nerve problems like TTS, etc. If you just a traditional case of PF, and follow the conservative methods hopefully it will resolve itself in a short time. Also ESWT might help if methods like ART, and acupunture, etc. fail. Try to not have any more cortisone shots.

People that don't suffer from foot pain just can't understand how devasting in can be. That's why this board is so great. You realize you are not alone. From what I've seen the UK has a lot of resources, and it's just a matter of getting to the right people to help you. This is the case in the US, or anywhere. There are many fine podiatry schools, and probably more alternative treatments available in the UK then the US.

Donna

Re: Hi Donna

yasmin on 5/18/02 at 17:16 (084476)

Thanks for mailing me back.

I haven't has any x-rays or anything of that sort. The docter asked me what my symptoms were, checked my right foot and told me I had PF - thats all! But readig up on PF confirms that I do have it. I think it would be a good idea to go a foot clinic that is near to where I live. As to regards to footwear, the only thing I've been wearing is trainers, and they seem fine, they do the job, I can't wear anything else right now. AM seriously thinking about getting some more comfortable shoes, actually I keeping a store called 'Birks', I think I may find out about mail order and gets some insoles from them.

It seems that most people do get better or get some sort relief as time goes by, so I am trying to stay positive, but I find it really hard, especially when I see gorgeous high heeled shoes, and know I won't be wearing them for a very long time.

Actually the clinic I am thinking about going to talked about a treatment called 'reflectron'??????, the advert said it has been used in the states successfully? Have you heard of it?

Keep in touch!

Yasmin

Re: Hi Yasmin

Donna SL on 5/18/02 at 18:18 (084488)

Hi Yasmin

The reflectron is just a smaller version of the Ossatron that's used in the states. ESWT, esp Ossatron has been done a lot longer in Europe than here. Is the name of the clinic you are thinking of called the Oving clinic in Chichester? I think there may be others now that have it in London though.

http://www.ovingclinic.co.uk/index.html

This is one of the links I mentioned in the previous post on uK resources.

If you are thinking of Chelsea physio I don't know how much experience he has in it, if it is the person I'm thinking of. He's a PT not a orthopedic md, or podiatrist. I spoke with him last spring. I think you would be better off going to the Oving clinic even if it requires a little more traveling unless you find a podiatrist, or orthopedic md in London performing it. Some people who wrote in on the board had success with Orving. I think the ESWT is performed by an md/orthopod. The cost is very reasonable.

Also, there are all kinds of trainers, and some may not be supportive enough for PF, so it's important to be wearing the proper ones for your foot type. If they are too soft in the heel, for example Nike air, they may cause more strain on the heel, and pf. There are plenty of trainers around that do not have sufficient midfoot support. Which ones are you wearing?

I know what you mean about wearing nice looking shoes let alone gorgeous high heels. I wore my trainers every where when I was in London a couple of years ago. I wouldn't have been able to walk otherwise. I think London is a lot more conservative than California, and I felt like I was getting negative stares even in casual restaurants, stores, real estate offices, etc., in certain neighborhoods. Maybe it was my imagination sometimes, but there were times that I wasn't able to walk into cetain places with trainers on that would have been perfectly acceptable here. Sometimes I would carry regular shoes with me, and change before going into certain places. I'm not talking about a Saturday night fancy dinner, just average restaurants during the week. Sneakers (trainers) seem to be more acceptable for street wear in the US. I used to see women walking around Hyde Park in little sandals, and wondered how the heck they did it. Hope things change when I move there. Ha. Ha.

Donna

Re: Hi Donna

Yasmin on 5/19/02 at 18:23 (084601)

Hi ya, how r u?

The clinic is called http://fitter feet for life.co.uk. Why don't u check them out? They seem impressive. Actually I'm worried about seeing them - because of what they may find!! I don't want to go for the reflectron just yet, I think I would prefer to have some physio on it and learn some strengtening exercises instead, I believe this clinic has a physiotherapist there that maybe able to help me with the exercises.

My trainers are actually nike, and have an air bubble!! But I find them very comfortable!!

I wear my trainers everywhere, but I haven't had any problems with anyone giving me any negative stares!! (Well I haven't noticed anyway!) But I wouldn't care anyway because its me that suffers from heel pain not them.

I used to wear sandals and high heeled boots everywhere before PF, thats why I have it, I didn't think twice about it, and I really regret the day I got PF. I remember it was sunny and bright, and I decided to take Cameron (my son)to the park to meet some friends, I did think about wearing trainers, but I was fed up with them because I had been wearing them for the past few weeks, so I opted for my high heeled boots...and here I am now!!!!

How did you get PF?

I tried looking for pain management centres in the UK, and wasn't very successful. I'll try again tomorrow. By the way do u work, Donna?

Talk to u soon.

Yasmin

Re: Hi Yasmin

Donna SL on 5/20/02 at 03:43 (084644)

Hi Yasmin,

How are you today?

I looked at the Fitterfeet web site. Had to take a space out to get link to work

http://www.fitterfeetforlife.co.uk/

It seems very professional and interesting. I like that they do a computerized gait analysis, and have the in shoe scanner. Also, they seem to have a sports medicine background, and probably see a lot of PF. Don't be afraid to go to them. I'm sure there is nothing major wrong with your feet. You have the right idea about the Reflectron for now. If anything they may be able to advise you if you are in the right shoe, and if you have any really severe gait problems. They may also be able to suggest other forms of physio, and exercises as you mentioned.

Also, if you haven't done this already TAPING your feet daily while they heal can help you immensely, and hopefully they will show you how to do that properly. I would still suggest looking into therapies like ART, or some form of myofascial release, acupuncture, etc., even if they don't mention it. Most pods won't. Also physio, etc. on areas other then your feet like your calves (important), hamstrings, shins, etc. can help your pf.

Don't worry about minor gait problems though. Many people have imperfect biomechanics, and don't have PF, so I wouldn't let them sell you a pair of orthotics so fast. If you went without orthotics all your life than various methods of rehab should get you back on track. Unless you have really gross biomechanics orthotics can sometimes cause more problems then they are worth. What would be good is if they could tell you if you over pronated, or over supinated, what kind of foot type you had, etc.. This would help in making sure you are in the right trainer to help you heal. Ask them for shoe suggestions, and if they would observe your gait in various models.

Nike in general aren't a very stable shoe, unless you are in one of their motion control shoes, which are just so-so motion control shoes. If you have high arches, or a pretty neutral gait you wouldn't want to be in a motion control shoe anyway, but you would still want to be in a neutral stable shoe. Most of the Nikes have poor mid-foot support. Also, the Air in the heel is not the greatest for PF, and can cause the heel to move around to much. Nike isn't the only trainer that isn't that stable, and you have to be very selective with choosing any trainer. There are some lousy New Balance, Asics, Adidas, etc. models, but I think Nike, and Reebok are the worse for having the majority of their shoes with poor midfoot support, and torsional instability.

Hopefully this clinic would be knowledgable about shoes. Most of the podiatrist I had gone to in the past never advised me on shoes. It wasn't until I found this podiatrist who specialized in biomechanics who taught me about proper shoes, and watched me walk in various models did I realize what was right for my foot type. I thought the Nike model I was wearing was the greatest, yet I had foot pain, and when I listened to this doc, and got different shoes I started to feel better. Not all Nikes are bad, but you have to be careful in finding the few decent ones they, and most other athletic manufactures make.

It's important though that whatever you pick doesn't bend in the midfoot when you hold the heel in one hand, and push from the toes hard. The shoe should only bend where the toes bend. There is some other criteria, but a good podiatrist should show you how to test for torsional stability, support, etc.. There are more bad then good shoes on the market.

I actually got PF, and eventually TTS from having my biomechancis mis-diagnosed by a podiatrist, and then being put in the WRONG orthotics, and shoes. I was told I over-pronated, and was put in anti-pronation shoes, and inverted orthotics (rolled my feet out more) when in fact I have high arches, and over-supinate (roll my feet out too much). I realize now that the pod was either blind, or stupid, or both. I was fine before that except for some minor forefoot discomfort, but this combo put so much strain on my foot structures, and lower extremities. I was too ignorant at the time to realize this was causing the pain. I started to improve even before I started treatment after I went to a different podiatrist, and he recognized this, and had me get out of the orthotics, and the particular trainers I was in.

That's why it's important that you get a good biomechanics eval. You have to ask whomever evaluates you how extensive their training has been in biomechanics. Not every podiatrist has this background. Even then they can make mistakes. Sometimes just switching to the right shoe can put you on the road to recovery. Ironically the new pod said I never really needed orthotics in the first place, except for maybe an accommodative cushioned one, but the right shoe should be enough. This is coming from a world renowned pod who invented a technique for orthotics used internationally, and who's entire practice is only biomechanics, and orthotics. Yet he's done everything to discourage me from wearing orthotics.

I'm so glad you said that about the trainers, and the stares. I had the worse problems in areas like Chelsea, and some similar areas. My husband, and I were looking for properties, and I had some problems in the RE offices, some stores, and restaurants there. I also was not able to walk in the Ritz Hotel lobby in the afternoon. I wasn't there for tea. I just wanted to take some video pictures, and they wouldn't let me in the door with trainers on. Even in a couple of average restaurants we went into in other areas during the week the employees (host/owners?) made some snide remarks when I left about my trainers.

My husband's attitude is like yours, and he says I shouldn't care, but when they sit you in the outside seating area in a restaurant when there is room inside, or refuse entry into a hotel lobby in the afternoon, I find that upsetting. We were dressed nicely otherwise. I told my husband I won't live in any area that has that attitude. Areas like Picadilly Circus, Convent Gardens, Oxford street area, etc., were more lenient. A young college girl I know just got back from London, and had similar experiences. I guess I'll just learn to ignore things, and stay out of places like the Ritz, and Chelsea. Ha Ha.

I haven't had a chance to look much myself, but I remember a particular pain mgt society in the UK. When I have a chance I'll look again.
Try putting 'pain management' UK ( Keep the UK out of quotes). Or just plug in 'pain managment', and you'll find tons of societies, organizations, etc., which include resource links. This is just a start, but below is a list of internet resoures from the American Academy of Pain mgt of almost all the pain mgt links, and most list links to other countries. You may have to go into each listing, and look for international links. Usually check under 'resources'

http://www.painmed.org/netresources/

main page address to aapm
http://www.painmed.org/

Phew! I know this seems like a lot of work, so also ask doctors, and other health professionals if they know of doctors in this field.

I'm not working at the moment. Thank goodness. I think getting better has been a full time job in itself, and don't know if I would have been able to do it if I was. Are you working? I'll bet taking care of your little son, and having PF must be a handful. I admire you for that.

Hope I didn't bore you with the long winded shoe info, but sometimes that can be one of the most important components in curing PF.

Donna

Re: Hi Yasmin

paula on 5/20/02 at 09:37 (084657)

what are trainers?

Re: Hi Yasmin

yasmin on 5/20/02 at 15:45 (084692)

Hi Paula

In the UK we call sneakers, trainers!!

Yasmin

Re: Hi Donna

yasmin on 5/20/02 at 16:27 (084694)

Hi Donna

Thanks again for all the information, its all really helpful, you've done you're research really well!

I think you're right about the trainers, because if I walk more than 5-10 minutes I get aches and pains in my arche and my heel starts to get really sore. Whats orthotics?? I keep hearing that word on the discussion board. I still haven't made an appointment with that clinic, I am really paranoid to what they may say to me, like 'it's too late, theres nothing we can do for you!'. I think the last docter has made me paranoid. I know it would benefit me a lot to go as soon as possible.

I am not working, I am doing a Masters degree in Information Science, I ve just finished my finals, but still have lectures to attend. I have to do two reports, and five essays and a presentation in five weeks!! Its really hard work, especially if you have a toddler to look after. I tend to do my work in the evening when he goes to sleep. But to tell you the truth I feel really exhausted right now, I really don't want to. I have lectures tomorrow, and am worried about the long walk from teh tube station to university. But I have to go because I have arrange the presentation with a few other students, otherwise I would of made my excuses and stayed at home.

My foot is aching and feeling sore right now because I've been standing in the kitchen making dinner in my slippers!!!

Before I go to bed I am going to put some ice on it, that does help. What type of shoes to you wear around the house?? I have learnt so much since last week when I found this website (and you!), and having the right shoes is so vital, I really want to get over this. The restrictions are so depressing. My husband just cut the grass in the garden so I can sit out there with Cameron on sunny days instead of going to the park. I feel really gulity sometimes because I can't take him out as often as I like, but my friend keeps telling me that as long as he has love and attention Cameron will be happy.

When did you come London? I suppose some areas in Chelsea will be fussy when it comes to footwear, but I think most places are fine. Don't worry too much about it, hopefully you'll be 100% better when me to London. What does you're husband do, and what would you like to do when you're here?

It's really tough having young children when you have PF. I want to have more but I know its gonna be really hard with PF, if I am pregnant, as you can't take any painkillers.

Its raining heavily outside, its 10.30pm and I have an urge to eat a chocolate cookie!! So thats what I'm gonna do!

I hope my foot is okay for tomorrow, I wish I could take the ice with me.

How's your foot/feet?? I hope you get better soon.

Talk to u tomorrow!

yasmin

Re: Paula

yasmin on 5/20/02 at 16:42 (084696)

Hi paula

In the UK we call sneakers, trainers!!

Yasmin

Re: Yasmin - Hope your feet hold up today

Donna SL on 5/21/02 at 04:58 (084745)

Hi Yasmin,

Hope you enjoyed that chocolate cookie. It's raining here tonight too in San Francisco. That's unusual for this time of the year. It rarely rains at all here except maybe a couple of weeks in the winter time. It's such a big thing when it rains here, and they were making a big deal of it on the news tonight.

Orthotics are like arch supports, but they do much more than that. They help correct any biomechanical problems. They can be temporary, or permanent devices depending on your problem. When you have PF it helps to stabilize the foot, so it can heal. This can be done with orthotics, or tape. Tape is probably the best thing.

Also a small heel lift maybe only 1/16 of an inch inserted under the insert in your trainers above the heel cushion could take a lot of stress off your fascia. Your foot wouldn't sink into the air pocket in the shoe as much, and this would relieve strain on the fascia. You wouldn't believe how much a small lift can do. I wear them in all trainers. It has to be a firm rubber type heel lift, or birko cork type material not some soft gel type thing. It would be best if a podiatrist gave this to you.

Also Tuli heel cups might help. If you do a search on Tuli Heel cups you'll find tons of them on the web. They give your heel a good lift, and may stabiize it a bit. Also, some people have found relief with viscoe spots heel pads. I didn't like them because they were posted a bit too much on the medial side, and felt too soft to me. Hopefully the podiatrist at this clinic would be familiar with all these, but if not you can order them off the web. I think the pale yellow ones (tuli) might be the best for pf. I just picked one web site that had them, but there are many others.

http://www.orthomedicalsupplies.com/Merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=oms&Product_Code=10010&Category_Code=t

all tuli heel cups
http://www.orthomedicalsupplies.com/Merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=oms&Category_Code=t

The above came from this website that shows a lot of products

http://www.orthomedicalsupplies.com/Merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=SFNT&Store_Code=oms

At home I either wear a firm slip on platform type sandal, or a clog type of shoe. I probably wouldn't be able to walk outside in them, but they work well for standing around, and walking slow at home. It gives the foot a rest with the extra support. Bedroom slippers tend to be too soft. You don't have to spend a lot. As long as they are raised somewhat in the heel, and have a firm midfoot, and maybe some extra cushion on the foot bed. Sketcher type sandals, or cheaper no brand names of a similar type would be fine. Even some men's sandals work well, because they are wider, and work with thick socks. Open, or closed backs are fine.

We were in London about 1 1/2 years ago for a couple of weeks. I've been there several times before that. My husband's sister was getting married. up in Scotland, where is parents live now, so we spent some time there too. If we have time we'll go back sometimes this summer, or early fall.

This may sound silly, but maybe if you have a cold pack bag you could bring a small coke bottle filled with frozen water, and take it out if needed. You just roll your foot over it, or keep it on the PF area. Maybe go into a small lounge area somewhere. It doesn't melt that fast in the plastic bottle, and would stay cold for hours. The other option is just get some ice from an ice machine, and put it in a plastic bag.

It's nice that you have a garden. What part of London do you live in? Pregnancy would be tough on PF, because of the extra weight. Hopefully you'll knock it out very soon, so you can continue with your family.

The important thing is to get as much treatment as you can now. I'm sure you're not a hopeless case, and your pf is still in the early stages. What can hurt you is waiting to get additional treatment, because as I mentioned before the more chronic it becomes the more difficult it is to get rid of. Also, a chronic pain situation can occur, with literaly changes to the nervous system the longer pain itself is left untreated. The pain sort of spreads. A stronger pain killer like ultram might be of benefit. Also the nerves in the foot get irritated from PF, and drugs like neurontin can help calm pain down too. All these medications including an anti-inflammatories can be taken together if necessary.

My feet have felt the best they have in a long time this past month, or so. I've been standing, and walking much more then I have in a long time. Sometimes my PF gets a little irritated, but I have little, or none of the horrible foot nerve pain from tarsal tunnel syndrome lately. I got a little over confident tonight, and spent close to an hour exercising on a statonary bike, and Nordic track, and my ankles are a bit sore around the TT area. I hope I didn't hurt anything. Swimming is the best, but I haven't been in the mood lately to swim. That was the only form of exercise I could do for the longest time, except for some light cycling.

My husband owns a computer softwear and consulting business. As for me I would love to do something to help people with foot pain. I would like to open up some type of foot comfort store which would include shoes, OTC devices, etc. The commercial rents in London are probably a fortune though. My pod says I should go to podiatry school, but I don't know if I could take going back to school again. I really have to think about it. I have a BS degree in business, and my background has been mainly in computer science, so I would have to start from scratch, and do all the pre med type courses before I could even start pod school. I've also thought of studying physical therapy, and specializing in foot problems, but again it would require much more schooling. I'm just so sick of the computer business, and want to do something to help people with feet problems.

Yasmin do you have an email address I could write you at? I could still write to you here if you like, but I'd love to talk in more detail about feet, and other things that aren't part of the treatment section.

I hope your feet feel a little better today.

Donna

Re: Hi Donna

yasmin on 5/21/02 at 10:42 (084764)

Hi ya

My email address is (email removed). That'll be cool if u could write to me there! This thread is getting too long!

I came home early roday, I was in quite a lot of discomfort in the morning, but decided to go in anyway because I've been 'kinda shoved' into being the leader of the presentation group (I didn't ask for it but no one was communicating with each other expect with me). I really didn't want to go because my heel felt sore, and Cameron was being difficult demanding me to put on Bob the Builder (children's TV character), I was sooooo stressed, and had to ask my mum to come and collect him (she looks after him when I go to uni). I then decided to get a cab to the station from my house. By the time I got to uni, my heel seemed a little better, but then later it started to ache and hurt, and I couldn't concentrate on what was happening in the lecture, all I wanted was ice, and lots of it and I felt mad at the docter who treated me and at myself for wearing those heels etc etc. So I left, I felt gulity, because I need to get some reading material in order to complete the assignments, but I couldn't bear the thought of walking around the library looking for books, so I just went home.

I feel really miserable actually, I think its just a bad day. When of the students was trying to convince to go to a university ball, and I was trying to explain to her I wouldn't be able to, because I can't wear heels. So that annoyed me, because I can't do anything right now!!!!!!

I brought some tape, so I could give taping a try, by consulting the heel book of this website, is that a good idea?

Also that section on injections on this website has made feel really scared.

Oh someones at the door, I'll talk to u later

bye

Re: Hi Donna

yasmin on 5/21/02 at 16:59 (084790)

Hi Donna

I am definately having a really bad day. My foot has been soooo sore all day, and now I am beginning to get twinges of pain. I've been so upset, I burst into tears in front of Cameron, who didn't know what to do!

Its just I have so many dreams like, I wanted to have more children, start a placement in a company to complete my dissertation, go out shopping, to the beach etc etc etc..

Right now the way I feel I don't feel that will ever be achievable. Do u think its true that once u get PF, u have it for life and have to always take care of that injury??

God I am depressed!!!

I going to make that appointment with Fitter Feet tomorrow.
Yasmin

Re: Yasmin - Don't worry

Donna SL on 5/21/02 at 17:38 (084793)

Hi Yasmin,

Please believe me that you will get better. I was in terrible shape last year, and never thought I would get to the improved stage I'm at now. I can understand your fears, and frustrations, but try to stay calm. I know how hard that is at the time you are feeling this way, but trust me you will be able to do all the things you want again. I couldn't even go grocery shopping last year, and now I stand in the stores for hours. I think I do it on purpose, and stay out until the cows come home, because I can't believe it myself yet.

I wrote you an email a little over hour ago. Did you get it? I'm glad you made that appointment with Fitter Feet.

Donna

Re: Hey Donna!

yasmin on 5/21/02 at 17:58 (084794)

Yeah I have received your email, thanks. I ve just mailed you back. Thanks for your mail of encouragement. I think its quite hard to find people to help with PF here, maybe its just trail and error, but it does seem a really long road. I am going to make that appointment tomorrow!
Its brilliant that you're feet much better, the only way is up now!
yasmin