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Standing / walking time

Posted by Pete R on 5/11/02 at 14:02 (083543)

Many people on this Board talk about pain levels etc. On average what period of time can people walk / stand during a day before they get pain ?

My job is very biased toward sitting so I'm lucky, at weekends i can stand washing a car for an hour etc before i feel the pain and have to stop. What about everyone else ?

Re: Standing / walking time

Carole C in NOLA on 5/11/02 at 14:16 (083546)

Pete, from your description I'd guess your pain level is extremely low relative to those here. Standing on concrete for an hour is not something I could have possibly done when my PF was acute. You say it takes an hour of standing washing a car before you feel the pain, and that's better than a lot of people when they are essentially completely healed.

Carole C

Re: Standing / walking time

Sharon W on 5/11/02 at 18:09 (083563)

Pete,

What an interesting question! I'll be fascinated to see how people respond.

Unfortunately, I couldn't give you just ONE anwer for that one. In the morning, after having my feet up on a pillow all night, my pain level is usually 0 or 1 and I can be on my feet for at least 45 minutes, sometimes as much as an hour before the pain really makes me go searching for a place to sit down. Perhaps part of the reason for that is that I take my anti-inflammatory in the AM. What seems to happen is that if I take it the first thing when I wake up, my feet never get a chance to swell because Vioxx seems able to prevent further swelling but NOT able to reduce it once it IS swollen. But the Vioxx begins wearing off as it becomes afternoon, and by evening it doesn't seem to help at all...

Anyway, it's a different story after, say, 5 pm. At that point I can't be on my feet more than 15 minutes without being in terrible pain.

I hope that's useful info.

-- Sharon

Re: Standing / walking time

D.Thomas on 5/11/02 at 22:31 (083579)

I only having about 4-5 minutes before the pain sets in. It can get to the point whenever I am on my feet I feel pain. It's pretty constant for me.

Re: Standing / walking time

Andrue on 5/12/02 at 05:32 (083585)

I'm about the same as you except that I can't really say that I've even been in extreme pain. At its worst is just been like having a stone in my shoe. Uncomfortable and enough to make me limp late last year but that's about it. OTOH I think my PF was definately an injury rather than just overuse so it's just a question of giving my feet the chance to complete their recovery.

Re: Standing / walking time

Carole C in NOLA on 5/12/02 at 06:24 (083587)

That's more like how it was for me when my PF was acute. I was not capable of standing for longer than 4-5 minutes.

Carole C

Re: Standing / walking time

DonnaM in VA on 5/12/02 at 17:49 (083652)

I have had PF since Nov, but didn't go to a dr. until March. I have a bad time after sitting and then trying to walk. I also have a hard time walking for any length of time. I just don't know what to do. Dr. said next thing was cortisone shots in the heel, but I don't really think i want that.

Re: Standing / walking time

Carole C in NOLA on 5/12/02 at 18:25 (083655)

Donna, be sure to read the heel pain book on this site. There are a lot of things you can do for PF yourself. Stretching, icing, never going barefoot, and so many other treatments can help in your recovery. It takes several months but most people can fully recover if they work hard at these non-surgical treatments. I think it helps to read and participate on the message boards at this site, too.

Carole C

Re: Standing / walking time

Julie on 5/13/02 at 02:59 (083676)

Donna, DON'T walk for any length of time. PF won't heal without rest, so you need to face the fact that you can't continue with the activities you used to regard as normal: an adjustment must be made.

Do read the heel pain book.

Most people with PF find getting up after sitting painful. It helps to stretch before getting up. Bend the feet backward and forward a few times, and circle them a few times.

What treatment did your doctor advise before advising cortisone shots? If that is all s/he has to offer, it's time to look for another. Is your doctor a podiatrist?

Re: Standing / walking time

Andrue on 5/13/02 at 07:57 (083684)

I'll second that comment about resting but if anyone can give some hints on how to stay in doors on a lovely early Summer's day when you're close enough to the edge of town to hear the sounds of the country I'd love to know it .

Re: Standing / walking time

wendyn on 5/13/02 at 13:54 (083708)

Don't stay indoors!!

Grab a book, sit in the shad, watch the birds, nap.

Kneel on a piece of carpet and dig in the garden.

You don't have to stay inside to rest...it's probably better for your emotional health if you don't.

Re: Standing / walking time

CarlW on 5/13/02 at 16:37 (083724)

Pete,

I think that is an excellent question. It is definitely more objective than the pain scale. I would be in the 10 to 15 minutes before I am really thinking about wanting to sit down, however my feet hurt pretty much all the time. There is no way I could be on my feet for an hour.

Carl

Re: OOPS GRAMER PATROL

lisa k on 5/18/02 at 01:43 (084420)

WATCH THE GRAMMER

Re: Standing / walking time

Carole C in NOLA on 5/11/02 at 14:16 (083546)

Pete, from your description I'd guess your pain level is extremely low relative to those here. Standing on concrete for an hour is not something I could have possibly done when my PF was acute. You say it takes an hour of standing washing a car before you feel the pain, and that's better than a lot of people when they are essentially completely healed.

Carole C

Re: Standing / walking time

Sharon W on 5/11/02 at 18:09 (083563)

Pete,

What an interesting question! I'll be fascinated to see how people respond.

Unfortunately, I couldn't give you just ONE anwer for that one. In the morning, after having my feet up on a pillow all night, my pain level is usually 0 or 1 and I can be on my feet for at least 45 minutes, sometimes as much as an hour before the pain really makes me go searching for a place to sit down. Perhaps part of the reason for that is that I take my anti-inflammatory in the AM. What seems to happen is that if I take it the first thing when I wake up, my feet never get a chance to swell because Vioxx seems able to prevent further swelling but NOT able to reduce it once it IS swollen. But the Vioxx begins wearing off as it becomes afternoon, and by evening it doesn't seem to help at all...

Anyway, it's a different story after, say, 5 pm. At that point I can't be on my feet more than 15 minutes without being in terrible pain.

I hope that's useful info.

-- Sharon

Re: Standing / walking time

D.Thomas on 5/11/02 at 22:31 (083579)

I only having about 4-5 minutes before the pain sets in. It can get to the point whenever I am on my feet I feel pain. It's pretty constant for me.

Re: Standing / walking time

Andrue on 5/12/02 at 05:32 (083585)

I'm about the same as you except that I can't really say that I've even been in extreme pain. At its worst is just been like having a stone in my shoe. Uncomfortable and enough to make me limp late last year but that's about it. OTOH I think my PF was definately an injury rather than just overuse so it's just a question of giving my feet the chance to complete their recovery.

Re: Standing / walking time

Carole C in NOLA on 5/12/02 at 06:24 (083587)

That's more like how it was for me when my PF was acute. I was not capable of standing for longer than 4-5 minutes.

Carole C

Re: Standing / walking time

DonnaM in VA on 5/12/02 at 17:49 (083652)

I have had PF since Nov, but didn't go to a dr. until March. I have a bad time after sitting and then trying to walk. I also have a hard time walking for any length of time. I just don't know what to do. Dr. said next thing was cortisone shots in the heel, but I don't really think i want that.

Re: Standing / walking time

Carole C in NOLA on 5/12/02 at 18:25 (083655)

Donna, be sure to read the heel pain book on this site. There are a lot of things you can do for PF yourself. Stretching, icing, never going barefoot, and so many other treatments can help in your recovery. It takes several months but most people can fully recover if they work hard at these non-surgical treatments. I think it helps to read and participate on the message boards at this site, too.

Carole C

Re: Standing / walking time

Julie on 5/13/02 at 02:59 (083676)

Donna, DON'T walk for any length of time. PF won't heal without rest, so you need to face the fact that you can't continue with the activities you used to regard as normal: an adjustment must be made.

Do read the heel pain book.

Most people with PF find getting up after sitting painful. It helps to stretch before getting up. Bend the feet backward and forward a few times, and circle them a few times.

What treatment did your doctor advise before advising cortisone shots? If that is all s/he has to offer, it's time to look for another. Is your doctor a podiatrist?

Re: Standing / walking time

Andrue on 5/13/02 at 07:57 (083684)

I'll second that comment about resting but if anyone can give some hints on how to stay in doors on a lovely early Summer's day when you're close enough to the edge of town to hear the sounds of the country I'd love to know it .

Re: Standing / walking time

wendyn on 5/13/02 at 13:54 (083708)

Don't stay indoors!!

Grab a book, sit in the shad, watch the birds, nap.

Kneel on a piece of carpet and dig in the garden.

You don't have to stay inside to rest...it's probably better for your emotional health if you don't.

Re: Standing / walking time

CarlW on 5/13/02 at 16:37 (083724)

Pete,

I think that is an excellent question. It is definitely more objective than the pain scale. I would be in the 10 to 15 minutes before I am really thinking about wanting to sit down, however my feet hurt pretty much all the time. There is no way I could be on my feet for an hour.

Carl

Re: OOPS GRAMER PATROL

lisa k on 5/18/02 at 01:43 (084420)

WATCH THE GRAMMER