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Histamine reaction in feet... would antihistamines help?

Posted by Ellen J. on 5/13/02 at 12:29 (083704)

I just went to a doctor who told me I'm an atypical patient (since none of the standard things work for me) and he said I seem to be one of those who has a high histamine reaction to stress on my feet. My quseion is; would taking antihistamines help keep my feet from reacting so much to little changes while they heal from P.F.?
I do have a very reactive body--can't drink alcohol without feeling lousy. I am sensitive to chemicals more than others, if I gently scratch my skin I get red marks, etc.
Thanks for your thoughts,
Ellen
PS. I do ice and it does work well for me--just looking for more, that's all.

Re: Histamine reaction in feet... would antihistamines help?

Dr. John Cozzarelli on 5/14/02 at 06:00 (083795)

Hi Ellen:

The problem with most antihistamines is that they cause drowsyness. Perhaps you could try Benadryl (diphenhydramine) at bedtime. See how you do.

Dr. John Cozzarelli

Re: Thanks, Dr. Cozzarelli

Ellen J. on 5/14/02 at 10:07 (083819)

Thank you!
I tried Dyphenhydramine Maleate (Chlor-Trimetron 8 hr.) last night and my feet were much better this AM but I figure it must be a coincidence. Am keeping my expectations very low to avoid disappointment. I have to say that I slept really well last night and even so, the med is not making me drowsy (yet) today. I'll be careful of that, esp. driving.
Thanks again,
Ellen
P.S. does this anti-histamine thing make sense to anyone? Am questioning it but still trying it.

Re: Ellen: Histamines

Sharon W on 5/14/02 at 10:20 (083822)

Ellen,

Histamines cause an inflammatory reaction, and if that were to happen in the tissues of your feet, I'm sure it would inflame them and make them sore. Anti-histamines are intended to reduce these effects.

-- Sharon

Re: Sharon's note

Ellen J. on 5/14/02 at 17:37 (083889)

Hi Sharon,
I was interested when the doctor said I had a strong histamine reaction in my feet. I am guessing he meant that my feet are over-reactive to little changes such as different shoes and other slight changes. My thoughts were that if my body is producing histamines because of those little aggravations to my feet, then if I took antihistamines, maybe my body wouldn't produce the amount of histamines when I do little things. That may be totally off the wall, but it's just a guess. I don't know if such a condition exists with P.F. If I were to form a theory, it would be that an overly reactive body produces histamines in response to a strain, which causes swelling, which aggravates the tissue, perpetuating the P.F. I know this is boring--sorry--it's pure speculation.
Thank you for your note on this issue.
If my antihistamine woks, I'll let everyone know--but I certainly have my doubts.
Ellen J.

Re: Histamine reaction

Sharon W on 5/14/02 at 18:57 (083906)

Ellen,

Of course, most of us associate histamines with treatment for allergies because large amounts of histamines are produced in the allergen/antibody (allergic) reaction. But histamines are actually the body chemicals that cause dilation and leaking from capillaries (the tiniest blood vessels), which is an important part of the inflammation process. I read in one of those health news reports that inflammation increases with age and is probably in fact a 'normal' part of aging. Certain stress hormones have also been reported to trigger inflammation. So, it makes logical sense that stress could cause a histamine reaction, and if that is the case it also makes sense that anti-histmines might help! Anyway, it's certainly worth a try -- why NOT?

Please do let us know how it works out, whether it seems to lead to improvement.

-- Sharon

Re: OOps -- correction

Sharon W on 5/14/02 at 19:13 (083909)

I certainly belong on the list of those who make lots of typos and syntax errors!

What I meant to say in the first sentance of the above message, is that most of us associate ANTI-histamines with treatment for allergies because lots of histamines are produced during an allergic reaction, and the purpose of ANTI-histamines is to undo some of that.

-- Sharon

Re: Histamines

Ellen J. on 5/14/02 at 20:49 (083929)

Thanks Sharon,
Either way, your typo would have been correct, I think. Therefore, I hadn't even caught it. Thanks for letting me know about histamines and age--maybe true now that I'm 43? If you (or anyone) have any information about foods that cause histamine reactions I would be interested to hear. I know that wine, cheese (and other dairy), shellfish, etc. cause histamine reactions but am wondering what others. I have noticed that my feet feel terrible if I drink wine. Wierd, I know.
Anyway, thank you for that information.
Ellen

Re: Histamines

wendyn on 5/14/02 at 22:39 (083963)

Ellen - actually I get a very big histamine reaction from POTATO chips. Believe it...or not.

It's true, I can eat Nacho chips, or the chips and salsa type chips - but not an Old Dutch Ripple or All Dressed chip. My face and neck turn VERY red and blotchy - I sort of turn purple, and my nose sweats. It's gross.

Re: Histamines

Ellen J. on 5/15/02 at 08:31 (084001)

Wow! That is a bad reaction. I can't imagine what is in the chips that is doing that. Some chemical additive, I would guess, if regualar home fries don't do that to you. It would be interesting to look at the packaging and see if there is some chemical common to the two types of chips you can't eat.
I get reactions (in the form of canker sores in my mouth) from chocolate, coffee, sugar, walnuts, etc. However, I think that is what is called a food sensitivity rather than an allergy. Your reaction sounds like an allergy.
Anyway, it would be interesting to do a survey to see if a larger portion of P.F. sufferers have bodies that are sensitive and reactive to things--either chemicals or stress, etc.
Glad you can at least eat Nachos!
Ellen

Re: Histamines

Sharon W on 5/15/02 at 10:40 (084012)

Wendyn,

My daughter was tested for food allergies and the Dr. said she was allergic to tomatoes and potatoes. He said that both allergies were relatively common. She hates it, because she can't have french fries OR pizza!

-- Sharon

Re: Histamine reaction in feet... would antihistamines help?

DR Zuckerman on 5/15/02 at 20:11 (084088)

Do your feet itch, turn red, do you get the typical red marks on your feet. ?

Re: Histamine reaction in feet... would antihistamines help?

Dr. John Cozzarelli on 5/14/02 at 06:00 (083795)

Hi Ellen:

The problem with most antihistamines is that they cause drowsyness. Perhaps you could try Benadryl (diphenhydramine) at bedtime. See how you do.

Dr. John Cozzarelli

Re: Thanks, Dr. Cozzarelli

Ellen J. on 5/14/02 at 10:07 (083819)

Thank you!
I tried Dyphenhydramine Maleate (Chlor-Trimetron 8 hr.) last night and my feet were much better this AM but I figure it must be a coincidence. Am keeping my expectations very low to avoid disappointment. I have to say that I slept really well last night and even so, the med is not making me drowsy (yet) today. I'll be careful of that, esp. driving.
Thanks again,
Ellen
P.S. does this anti-histamine thing make sense to anyone? Am questioning it but still trying it.

Re: Ellen: Histamines

Sharon W on 5/14/02 at 10:20 (083822)

Ellen,

Histamines cause an inflammatory reaction, and if that were to happen in the tissues of your feet, I'm sure it would inflame them and make them sore. Anti-histamines are intended to reduce these effects.

-- Sharon

Re: Sharon's note

Ellen J. on 5/14/02 at 17:37 (083889)

Hi Sharon,
I was interested when the doctor said I had a strong histamine reaction in my feet. I am guessing he meant that my feet are over-reactive to little changes such as different shoes and other slight changes. My thoughts were that if my body is producing histamines because of those little aggravations to my feet, then if I took antihistamines, maybe my body wouldn't produce the amount of histamines when I do little things. That may be totally off the wall, but it's just a guess. I don't know if such a condition exists with P.F. If I were to form a theory, it would be that an overly reactive body produces histamines in response to a strain, which causes swelling, which aggravates the tissue, perpetuating the P.F. I know this is boring--sorry--it's pure speculation.
Thank you for your note on this issue.
If my antihistamine woks, I'll let everyone know--but I certainly have my doubts.
Ellen J.

Re: Histamine reaction

Sharon W on 5/14/02 at 18:57 (083906)

Ellen,

Of course, most of us associate histamines with treatment for allergies because large amounts of histamines are produced in the allergen/antibody (allergic) reaction. But histamines are actually the body chemicals that cause dilation and leaking from capillaries (the tiniest blood vessels), which is an important part of the inflammation process. I read in one of those health news reports that inflammation increases with age and is probably in fact a 'normal' part of aging. Certain stress hormones have also been reported to trigger inflammation. So, it makes logical sense that stress could cause a histamine reaction, and if that is the case it also makes sense that anti-histmines might help! Anyway, it's certainly worth a try -- why NOT?

Please do let us know how it works out, whether it seems to lead to improvement.

-- Sharon

Re: OOps -- correction

Sharon W on 5/14/02 at 19:13 (083909)

I certainly belong on the list of those who make lots of typos and syntax errors!

What I meant to say in the first sentance of the above message, is that most of us associate ANTI-histamines with treatment for allergies because lots of histamines are produced during an allergic reaction, and the purpose of ANTI-histamines is to undo some of that.

-- Sharon

Re: Histamines

Ellen J. on 5/14/02 at 20:49 (083929)

Thanks Sharon,
Either way, your typo would have been correct, I think. Therefore, I hadn't even caught it. Thanks for letting me know about histamines and age--maybe true now that I'm 43? If you (or anyone) have any information about foods that cause histamine reactions I would be interested to hear. I know that wine, cheese (and other dairy), shellfish, etc. cause histamine reactions but am wondering what others. I have noticed that my feet feel terrible if I drink wine. Wierd, I know.
Anyway, thank you for that information.
Ellen

Re: Histamines

wendyn on 5/14/02 at 22:39 (083963)

Ellen - actually I get a very big histamine reaction from POTATO chips. Believe it...or not.

It's true, I can eat Nacho chips, or the chips and salsa type chips - but not an Old Dutch Ripple or All Dressed chip. My face and neck turn VERY red and blotchy - I sort of turn purple, and my nose sweats. It's gross.

Re: Histamines

Ellen J. on 5/15/02 at 08:31 (084001)

Wow! That is a bad reaction. I can't imagine what is in the chips that is doing that. Some chemical additive, I would guess, if regualar home fries don't do that to you. It would be interesting to look at the packaging and see if there is some chemical common to the two types of chips you can't eat.
I get reactions (in the form of canker sores in my mouth) from chocolate, coffee, sugar, walnuts, etc. However, I think that is what is called a food sensitivity rather than an allergy. Your reaction sounds like an allergy.
Anyway, it would be interesting to do a survey to see if a larger portion of P.F. sufferers have bodies that are sensitive and reactive to things--either chemicals or stress, etc.
Glad you can at least eat Nachos!
Ellen

Re: Histamines

Sharon W on 5/15/02 at 10:40 (084012)

Wendyn,

My daughter was tested for food allergies and the Dr. said she was allergic to tomatoes and potatoes. He said that both allergies were relatively common. She hates it, because she can't have french fries OR pizza!

-- Sharon

Re: Histamine reaction in feet... would antihistamines help?

DR Zuckerman on 5/15/02 at 20:11 (084088)

Do your feet itch, turn red, do you get the typical red marks on your feet. ?