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can i have an active future with a tarsal coalition?

Posted by samantha c on 5/29/02 at 21:36 (085693)

i left a message on the 19th about a suspected tarsal navicular stress fracture. since then i have gone to a very good orthopedist in my hometown and have been diagnosed with a calcaneonavicular coalition. i am having an mri done to see if the coalition is bony or cartilagenous. i now have degenerative arthritis between my first tarsal and metatarsal because of this coalition.
i am only 19 years old, and the idea of having arthritis upsets me. but more than that, i am wondering if i will ever be able to run again. i know that my competative future is over but i am very active and can not imagine my life without running in it. the orthopedist will not tell me anything until he gets the mri results but i want to know if anyone else has had this problem and continues to run. thank you!

Re: can i have an active future with a tarsal coalition?

Ed Davis, DPM on 5/29/02 at 22:36 (085708)

The condition you describe is sometimes termed a 'calcaneonavicular bar.'

It sounds serious but removal of the coalition surgically, particularly at a young age, usually leads to full restoration of function and the ability to return to full activities. It is not a very common surgery because of the relative rarity of the condition. The last such coalition I removed was about a year ago on a 17 year old who went back to running in about 3 weeks after the surgery. Not all cases are the same so you will need to discuss the details with your doc. Make sure he has some experience with the procedure. You will not find a doc who has done 'lots' of such procedures since the coalition is not that common.
Ed

Re: can i have an active future with a tarsal coalition?

Ed Davis, DPM on 5/29/02 at 22:36 (085708)

The condition you describe is sometimes termed a 'calcaneonavicular bar.'

It sounds serious but removal of the coalition surgically, particularly at a young age, usually leads to full restoration of function and the ability to return to full activities. It is not a very common surgery because of the relative rarity of the condition. The last such coalition I removed was about a year ago on a 17 year old who went back to running in about 3 weeks after the surgery. Not all cases are the same so you will need to discuss the details with your doc. Make sure he has some experience with the procedure. You will not find a doc who has done 'lots' of such procedures since the coalition is not that common.
Ed