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Sclerosing Injections for Neuroma

Posted by Peggy P. on 6/06/02 at 11:17 (086519)

Hi,

I've seen threads about this for treating neuromas. Some of the threads indicated a lot of pain but it was very vague. How long does the pain last when these injections are given? How many injections are given over time? And should my podiatrist treat it with lidocaine and not marcaine? Will I be able to return to work and will I be able to walk immediately after the injection?

I am considering this alternative as opposed to cortisone -- as I have had in the past -- not sure if my podiatrist is doing these treatments though.

Thanks

Peggy

Re: Sclerosing Injections for Neuroma

Ed Davis, DPM on 6/06/02 at 16:10 (086570)

A solution of 4% absolute alcohol in Marcaine is commonly used. A series of 3 to 7 shots, spaced 7 to 10 days apart is injected into the neuroma.
The concept is that the pain fibers within the neuroma are the most sensitive to alcohol and are selectively 'deadened.'

The response of patients vary but a number of patients notice a lot of soreness after the numbness wears off. Marcaine is a longer acting anesthetic than lidocaine so the area stays comfortable longer.

This technique can be quite effective. It seems to be less effective with larger neuromas.
Ed

Re: Sclerosing Injections for Neuroma

Eric C. on 7/03/02 at 17:45 (089051)

I started with the alcohol injections yesterday and if you are used to living with the pain of a neuroma, then the pain isn't bad at all. The initial injection wasn't the best, but it's over quick. Over the course of the day it felt like a pack of pennies was stuffed in my foot. I have a desk job, but was able to walk around as much as I needed to all day. Today my foot is back to 'normal.'

Re: Sclerosing Injections for Neuroma

Ed Davis, DPM on 6/06/02 at 16:10 (086570)

A solution of 4% absolute alcohol in Marcaine is commonly used. A series of 3 to 7 shots, spaced 7 to 10 days apart is injected into the neuroma.
The concept is that the pain fibers within the neuroma are the most sensitive to alcohol and are selectively 'deadened.'

The response of patients vary but a number of patients notice a lot of soreness after the numbness wears off. Marcaine is a longer acting anesthetic than lidocaine so the area stays comfortable longer.

This technique can be quite effective. It seems to be less effective with larger neuromas.
Ed

Re: Sclerosing Injections for Neuroma

Eric C. on 7/03/02 at 17:45 (089051)

I started with the alcohol injections yesterday and if you are used to living with the pain of a neuroma, then the pain isn't bad at all. The initial injection wasn't the best, but it's over quick. Over the course of the day it felt like a pack of pennies was stuffed in my foot. I have a desk job, but was able to walk around as much as I needed to all day. Today my foot is back to 'normal.'