Home The Book Dr Articles Products Message Boards Journal Articles Search Our Surveys Surgery ESWT Dr Messages Find Good Drs video

Scott, or anybody else, any suggestions?

Posted by ScottW on 6/07/02 at 07:38 (086634)

I was just at another podiatrist (the 2nd I've seen so far) yesterday. He said my feet look fine 'structurally' and that there is nothing more he can do. He said it doesn't sound like plantar fasciitis to him because there is no morning pain, the dull ache over entire bottom of both feet instead of just the heal, and they don't hurt to press on. He suggested going to see a neurologist. He thought it might be a nerve problem possibly even related to my back. Have you seen a neurologist ever for your feet? What do you think I should do? Also Dr. Zuckerman from N.J. talked with me on the phone a few weeks ago about ESWT and told me that I wasn't a candidate for ESWT because my pain wasn't specifically in one place. I am getting frustrated and depressed about my feet. For encouragement, I keep going back to Scott's story (the guy that put together Heelspurs.com) of his foot pain. It sounds so similar to mine except my feet never swell and taping doesn't seem to help me very much. What do you think I should do? Any suggestions?

Scott

Re: Scott, or anybody else, any suggestions?

Carole C in NOLA on 6/07/02 at 09:57 (086658)

I am not Scott, or a foot doctor, but I do have heelspurs and plantar fasciitis from which I'm mostly recovered. Here are my suggestions.

I think you should make an appointment with a neurologist, and meanwhile read Scott's heel pain book (free, on this site). Start working on some of the conservative treatments described, like gentle non-weightbearing (sitting) stretches, ice, perhaps Birkenstock sandals, never going barefoot.

Plantar fasciitis can occur without morning pain. It sometimes is a dull ache over the entire bottom of both feet. I don't know if it can exist without hurting when the doctor presses on your feet. Of course that all depends on the doctor knowing where to press.

In the event that the neurologist finds nothing treatable, I strongly suggest that you continue with attempts at conservative treatment for a few months. If this is plantar fasciitis, that's the best approach to begin with anyway.

You should see the neurologist to rule out the possibility of this being related to your back, because that may be treatable. In my experience, some neurologists sometimes have a tendency to relegate mysterious symptoms to various frightening and untreatable 'wastebasket diagnoses'. You might get a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis, peripheral neuritis of unknown cause, Raynaud's phenomenon, or other puzzling conditions.

Carole C

Re: Scott, or anybody else, any suggestions?

Dennis B. on 6/07/02 at 14:16 (086676)

Definitely go to a neurologist. He/She may perform an EMG or NCV to find or rule out other problems. Initially I was told Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome but learned of Spinal Stenosis and Peripheral Neuropathy. The Peripheral Neuropathy thing was in fact the underlying cause of my problems and has since been defined as being caused by Vasculitis. Good luck to you. Dennis

Re: Scott, or anybody else, any suggestions?

ScottW on 6/07/02 at 19:31 (086722)

Thanks for your response. What is the treatment for you now that you know what the underlying cause is? Has the treatment helped at all? What exactly is vasculitis?

Re: Scott, or anybody else, any suggestions?

Carole C in NOLA on 6/07/02 at 09:57 (086658)

I am not Scott, or a foot doctor, but I do have heelspurs and plantar fasciitis from which I'm mostly recovered. Here are my suggestions.

I think you should make an appointment with a neurologist, and meanwhile read Scott's heel pain book (free, on this site). Start working on some of the conservative treatments described, like gentle non-weightbearing (sitting) stretches, ice, perhaps Birkenstock sandals, never going barefoot.

Plantar fasciitis can occur without morning pain. It sometimes is a dull ache over the entire bottom of both feet. I don't know if it can exist without hurting when the doctor presses on your feet. Of course that all depends on the doctor knowing where to press.

In the event that the neurologist finds nothing treatable, I strongly suggest that you continue with attempts at conservative treatment for a few months. If this is plantar fasciitis, that's the best approach to begin with anyway.

You should see the neurologist to rule out the possibility of this being related to your back, because that may be treatable. In my experience, some neurologists sometimes have a tendency to relegate mysterious symptoms to various frightening and untreatable 'wastebasket diagnoses'. You might get a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis, peripheral neuritis of unknown cause, Raynaud's phenomenon, or other puzzling conditions.

Carole C

Re: Scott, or anybody else, any suggestions?

Dennis B. on 6/07/02 at 14:16 (086676)

Definitely go to a neurologist. He/She may perform an EMG or NCV to find or rule out other problems. Initially I was told Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome but learned of Spinal Stenosis and Peripheral Neuropathy. The Peripheral Neuropathy thing was in fact the underlying cause of my problems and has since been defined as being caused by Vasculitis. Good luck to you. Dennis

Re: Scott, or anybody else, any suggestions?

ScottW on 6/07/02 at 19:31 (086722)

Thanks for your response. What is the treatment for you now that you know what the underlying cause is? Has the treatment helped at all? What exactly is vasculitis?