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what kind of massages to do???

Posted by Marty on 6/09/02 at 14:22 (086848)

Hi, My name is Marty and I'v had PF for 4 years now. Been to 3 POD's and I'm on Nerunton, (spelled wrong). Anyway just woundering what kind of massages I could do to help blood flow etc.

Thanks,

Marty

Re: what kind of massages to do???

Ken S. on 6/09/02 at 18:49 (086876)

See my earlier post on massage and what seems to be continued relief of PF after three years of pain. The guy just did deep massages (two sessions), breaking up what he called the oatmeal in the calfs of my legs.

Re: what kind of massages to do???

BrianJ on 6/09/02 at 20:14 (086881)

Hi Marty --

I'm not very familiar with self-massage techniques, but you may want to consider finding a provider of Active Release Techniques ('ART'). Several people at this site have found ART to be helpful, and you can learn more about it on the internet. Has Neurontin helped you? Any side effects?

Re: what kind of massages to do???

john h on 6/10/02 at 10:15 (086927)

I know many people have posted positive comments about various forms of foot massage. I to have had foot massages and although they felt good they did not provide any long term relief.

On one occasion my massage thearapist recommed I try a Reflexologist which I did. She was extremely vigorous in her methods and it did cause manly John much pain. It caused my PF pain level to jump off the scale for about a month. I am very careful anymore about just how vigorous a massage I have on my feet. If your fascia is inflamed it seems that vigorous massage of that area would be counter productive.

Re: what kind of massages to do???

Carole C in NOLA on 6/10/02 at 12:07 (086949)

That makes sense to me in a big way, John.

Maybe I'm a little hypersensitive about people touching my feet, but due to PF they HURT and so NOBODY except me has touched my feet since my initial diagnosis and the making of my first orthotics. No surgery, no ESWT, no PT, no massage by anyone but me, none of that. Maybe that's part of the reason why I still balk at the idea of getting a pedicure (besides the fact that it sounds repulsive).

Because another person does not know on a personal level whether what they do hurts, I don't trust them to have as good a sense as me of what might be damaging my feet. If I had a significant other, I might let him massage my feet, because he would know me well enough to be able to tell immediately if I was in pain.

Considering the pain level that PF can bring, I think someone would have to be pretty desperate before allowing massage by a therapist. A lot of us are, from time to time, and there may have been times when I might have allowed it if the opportunity was timed right. Still, even then, I'd want to ask the therapist to start slowly and I'd maintain control of what he was and was not allowed to do... especially after reading your post, John.

Carole C

Re: what kind of massages to do???

Valerie S on 6/11/02 at 08:05 (087063)

Hi Marty,

I am not a doctor, and have no inside knowledge about massage or why it seems to really help some people. I DID, however, have 9 weeks of physical therapy, in which my favorite part was the massage I got from the PT. There were a couple times that his massage made my feet sore for a couple days after. He did tell me that the massage encouraged circulation and fresh blood to go into the feet, promoting healing.

What he mainly did, was to massage in sort of a circular motion at the insertion point and that area. I don't see how it could hurt you to try this on yourself... I have done it, and since you'd be the one doing it, you know when to stop. (if it hurts a lot, stop...)

For Christmas this year, my husband got me a book on massage techniques (ha ha, was it for me or for him...), and I did study the foot chapter. Just a good old foot massage, as long as you're gentle enough to prevent further injury, might be helpful to you. You could try going to the library and seeing what books they have there... ours has great details and pictures, and my husband LOVES the foot and hand massages I can give him now.

As long as you're careful, I'd say go ahead and give it a shot. Use some lotion, it doesn't have to be fancy (I personally LOVE Neutrogena Foot Cream, so rich, you can feel it for hours afterward...). Just the act of pampering your feet could give you the psychological boost you need to see a small improvement, which is better than none. I have also been told to prop my feet up on the wall while lying on my back with my butt against the wall... this will encourage some fresh blood to get pumped into your poor aching feet. Out with the old, in with the new...

Good luck and remember to be gentle. Let us know if it helps.

Val.

Re: what kind of massages to do???

paula on 6/11/02 at 08:18 (087064)

my physical therapist seems to believe in massage a lot. she showed me some techniques and instructions. i see her tomorrow for sprained ankle and maybe she'll massage that too. perhapse a few sessions with a pt who is massage oriented would help you see how to do it right.

Re: what kind of massages to do???

Marty on 6/11/02 at 10:58 (087097)

Yes the Neurontin has help, and they make me a bit foggy at times. I'm trying to find a provider that does ART but I live in Salt Lake City Utah and even with the Olympics and all there's still not many, at least that broadcast they do it.

Marty

Re: what kind of massages to do???

Marty on 6/11/02 at 11:04 (087098)

I guess I sould of said it would only be on my calves etc. Not my feet

Sorry

Re: what kind of massages to do???

Marty on 6/11/02 at 11:11 (087102)

Thanks, I think some of my problem is blood flow, so I'm just looking at ways for myself to help this. I do have TTS as well so there's not allot of blood getting by that darn tendon.

Marty

Re: what kind of massages to do???

Ken S. on 6/11/02 at 11:13 (087103)

The calves were theprimary targets of my massage therapist's work. They really were worked over. I felt later like I had walked 10 miles up hill due to the afterburn. But I am still pain free from PF with almost immediate relief after the first session.

I have to add that I, too, was unwilling to allow him to touch the insertion point and elsewhere on my feet proper. Instead, at his suggestion I VERY GENTLY started to work at it myself. Eventually, I was able to work out my entire foot (I will spare you the details of my bout with a pesky neuroma). Gentleness and warmth (warm soaks, towels, etc) are key to lossening up the tight areas and getting the blood to flow. But the key seemed to be at least one session with deep massage along the calves.

I wish you good luck and no pain.

Re: what kind of massages to do???

Ken S. on 6/09/02 at 18:49 (086876)

See my earlier post on massage and what seems to be continued relief of PF after three years of pain. The guy just did deep massages (two sessions), breaking up what he called the oatmeal in the calfs of my legs.

Re: what kind of massages to do???

BrianJ on 6/09/02 at 20:14 (086881)

Hi Marty --

I'm not very familiar with self-massage techniques, but you may want to consider finding a provider of Active Release Techniques ('ART'). Several people at this site have found ART to be helpful, and you can learn more about it on the internet. Has Neurontin helped you? Any side effects?

Re: what kind of massages to do???

john h on 6/10/02 at 10:15 (086927)

I know many people have posted positive comments about various forms of foot massage. I to have had foot massages and although they felt good they did not provide any long term relief.

On one occasion my massage thearapist recommed I try a Reflexologist which I did. She was extremely vigorous in her methods and it did cause manly John much pain. It caused my PF pain level to jump off the scale for about a month. I am very careful anymore about just how vigorous a massage I have on my feet. If your fascia is inflamed it seems that vigorous massage of that area would be counter productive.

Re: what kind of massages to do???

Carole C in NOLA on 6/10/02 at 12:07 (086949)

That makes sense to me in a big way, John.

Maybe I'm a little hypersensitive about people touching my feet, but due to PF they HURT and so NOBODY except me has touched my feet since my initial diagnosis and the making of my first orthotics. No surgery, no ESWT, no PT, no massage by anyone but me, none of that. Maybe that's part of the reason why I still balk at the idea of getting a pedicure (besides the fact that it sounds repulsive).

Because another person does not know on a personal level whether what they do hurts, I don't trust them to have as good a sense as me of what might be damaging my feet. If I had a significant other, I might let him massage my feet, because he would know me well enough to be able to tell immediately if I was in pain.

Considering the pain level that PF can bring, I think someone would have to be pretty desperate before allowing massage by a therapist. A lot of us are, from time to time, and there may have been times when I might have allowed it if the opportunity was timed right. Still, even then, I'd want to ask the therapist to start slowly and I'd maintain control of what he was and was not allowed to do... especially after reading your post, John.

Carole C

Re: what kind of massages to do???

Valerie S on 6/11/02 at 08:05 (087063)

Hi Marty,

I am not a doctor, and have no inside knowledge about massage or why it seems to really help some people. I DID, however, have 9 weeks of physical therapy, in which my favorite part was the massage I got from the PT. There were a couple times that his massage made my feet sore for a couple days after. He did tell me that the massage encouraged circulation and fresh blood to go into the feet, promoting healing.

What he mainly did, was to massage in sort of a circular motion at the insertion point and that area. I don't see how it could hurt you to try this on yourself... I have done it, and since you'd be the one doing it, you know when to stop. (if it hurts a lot, stop...)

For Christmas this year, my husband got me a book on massage techniques (ha ha, was it for me or for him...), and I did study the foot chapter. Just a good old foot massage, as long as you're gentle enough to prevent further injury, might be helpful to you. You could try going to the library and seeing what books they have there... ours has great details and pictures, and my husband LOVES the foot and hand massages I can give him now.

As long as you're careful, I'd say go ahead and give it a shot. Use some lotion, it doesn't have to be fancy (I personally LOVE Neutrogena Foot Cream, so rich, you can feel it for hours afterward...). Just the act of pampering your feet could give you the psychological boost you need to see a small improvement, which is better than none. I have also been told to prop my feet up on the wall while lying on my back with my butt against the wall... this will encourage some fresh blood to get pumped into your poor aching feet. Out with the old, in with the new...

Good luck and remember to be gentle. Let us know if it helps.

Val.

Re: what kind of massages to do???

paula on 6/11/02 at 08:18 (087064)

my physical therapist seems to believe in massage a lot. she showed me some techniques and instructions. i see her tomorrow for sprained ankle and maybe she'll massage that too. perhapse a few sessions with a pt who is massage oriented would help you see how to do it right.

Re: what kind of massages to do???

Marty on 6/11/02 at 10:58 (087097)

Yes the Neurontin has help, and they make me a bit foggy at times. I'm trying to find a provider that does ART but I live in Salt Lake City Utah and even with the Olympics and all there's still not many, at least that broadcast they do it.

Marty

Re: what kind of massages to do???

Marty on 6/11/02 at 11:04 (087098)

I guess I sould of said it would only be on my calves etc. Not my feet

Sorry

Re: what kind of massages to do???

Marty on 6/11/02 at 11:11 (087102)

Thanks, I think some of my problem is blood flow, so I'm just looking at ways for myself to help this. I do have TTS as well so there's not allot of blood getting by that darn tendon.

Marty

Re: what kind of massages to do???

Ken S. on 6/11/02 at 11:13 (087103)

The calves were theprimary targets of my massage therapist's work. They really were worked over. I felt later like I had walked 10 miles up hill due to the afterburn. But I am still pain free from PF with almost immediate relief after the first session.

I have to add that I, too, was unwilling to allow him to touch the insertion point and elsewhere on my feet proper. Instead, at his suggestion I VERY GENTLY started to work at it myself. Eventually, I was able to work out my entire foot (I will spare you the details of my bout with a pesky neuroma). Gentleness and warmth (warm soaks, towels, etc) are key to lossening up the tight areas and getting the blood to flow. But the key seemed to be at least one session with deep massage along the calves.

I wish you good luck and no pain.