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Chef/Professional Clogs

Posted by Zach on 6/09/02 at 23:44 (086897)

Hello, I have flat feet, and i am interested in buy professional/chef clogs. The professional birkenstock clogs either come with a cork or a polyethane footbed. Which footbed is best for a person with flat feet and gives the best support? Or should I remove the footbed and use the insole I currently use in my tennis shoes that help with my flat feet?

Thank you

Re: Chef/Professional Clogs

Carole C in NOLA on 6/10/02 at 00:06 (086899)

I think most people like the cork better than the plastic footbed, because the cork molds to the shape of your foot to some extent. If you get clogs with a removable footbed, you can try it both ways and see what you think.

Carole C

Re: Chef/Professional Clogs

Zach on 6/10/02 at 00:38 (086901)

The polyethane doesn't mold? The shoe model with the polyethane is more expensive! Any thoughts?

Thanks

Re: Chef/Professional Clogs

Carole C in NOLA on 6/10/02 at 09:32 (086921)

Just that Birkenstocks have based their world-wide reputation on their cork orthotic footbed, so that if you are getting Birkenstocks, it might be best to at least try that footbed.

The only other non-custom footbeds I know of that Birkenstock offers are the 'Birko-flor' plastic ones, which may be the ones you are talking about. Julie and others have said that they are quite definitely not as good because they do not mold like natural cork.

I guess my thoughts are that if it was me, I'd go ahead and see if the cork footbed works at all before branching out. You'll need to break in your Birkenstocks, an hour the first day, two hours the second, and so on. You need to do this and find out if your foot will tolerate Birkenstocks at all, to begin with, before you start wearing them at work.

I'd also consider using the custom orthotics that you mentioned you are having made. Some Birkenstocks have a removable footbed, so you can take theirs out and put yours in. Alternately, you could put your custom orthotics in another shoe that is appropriate to your work, but a high quality and supportive shoe approved of by your podiatrist.

Carole C

Re: Chef/Professional Clogs

Carole C in NOLA on 6/10/02 at 09:40 (086922)

Here's a link describing the polyurethane footbed.

http://www.birkenstockexpress.com/Products/Style.cfm?id=100620020734-121487&style=Professional%20Clog%20Footbed&collectionsub1=Footbed%20Replacements&collection=Insoles

You might have to copy and paste the link into your browser if clicking on it doesn't work, since it is so long.

I'm not sure if this polyurethane footbed is the same as the Birko-flor footbed or not, but it definitely states that it does not mold to the shape of the foot. It can get wet. You can buy a replacement footbed of this type, separately.

Carole C

Re: sorry, link was messed up

Carole C in NOLA on 6/10/02 at 09:44 (086923)

Sorry, the link didn't work. Try this. Go to the http://www.birkenstockexpress.com site, click on 'Insoles', click on 'footbed replacements', click on 'professional clog footbed'.

That should get you there.

Carole C

Re: Chef/Professional Clogs

Carole C in NOLA on 6/10/02 at 00:06 (086899)

I think most people like the cork better than the plastic footbed, because the cork molds to the shape of your foot to some extent. If you get clogs with a removable footbed, you can try it both ways and see what you think.

Carole C

Re: Chef/Professional Clogs

Zach on 6/10/02 at 00:38 (086901)

The polyethane doesn't mold? The shoe model with the polyethane is more expensive! Any thoughts?

Thanks

Re: Chef/Professional Clogs

Carole C in NOLA on 6/10/02 at 09:32 (086921)

Just that Birkenstocks have based their world-wide reputation on their cork orthotic footbed, so that if you are getting Birkenstocks, it might be best to at least try that footbed.

The only other non-custom footbeds I know of that Birkenstock offers are the 'Birko-flor' plastic ones, which may be the ones you are talking about. Julie and others have said that they are quite definitely not as good because they do not mold like natural cork.

I guess my thoughts are that if it was me, I'd go ahead and see if the cork footbed works at all before branching out. You'll need to break in your Birkenstocks, an hour the first day, two hours the second, and so on. You need to do this and find out if your foot will tolerate Birkenstocks at all, to begin with, before you start wearing them at work.

I'd also consider using the custom orthotics that you mentioned you are having made. Some Birkenstocks have a removable footbed, so you can take theirs out and put yours in. Alternately, you could put your custom orthotics in another shoe that is appropriate to your work, but a high quality and supportive shoe approved of by your podiatrist.

Carole C

Re: Chef/Professional Clogs

Carole C in NOLA on 6/10/02 at 09:40 (086922)

Here's a link describing the polyurethane footbed.

http://www.birkenstockexpress.com/Products/Style.cfm?id=100620020734-121487&style=Professional%20Clog%20Footbed&collectionsub1=Footbed%20Replacements&collection=Insoles

You might have to copy and paste the link into your browser if clicking on it doesn't work, since it is so long.

I'm not sure if this polyurethane footbed is the same as the Birko-flor footbed or not, but it definitely states that it does not mold to the shape of the foot. It can get wet. You can buy a replacement footbed of this type, separately.

Carole C

Re: sorry, link was messed up

Carole C in NOLA on 6/10/02 at 09:44 (086923)

Sorry, the link didn't work. Try this. Go to the http://www.birkenstockexpress.com site, click on 'Insoles', click on 'footbed replacements', click on 'professional clog footbed'.

That should get you there.

Carole C