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Little red wagon

Posted by J. King on 6/17/02 at 15:56 (087825)

My feet hurt so bad today after getting back from V.A. hospital that when I went to the grocery store I rode in one of those little electric carts to get my stuff. I was embarrassed because I look like a healthy guy but my feet were throbbing. I did manage to crash into a few people who did not move fast enough. People were jumping out of my way. What power!

Re: Little red wagon

Suzanne D on 6/17/02 at 16:29 (087829)

That's what the carts are for: to help people continue to shop when it is too hard - for whatever reason - to walk up and down the aisles. You were smart to take advantage of the opportunity.

I never looked down on anyone who shopped in one of the carts, but now I am even more happy to move out of their way and glad for them to have the cart as I know I was close to having to use one myself. These days when I meet someone in a cart, I make it a point to smile at them, and as I pass by I say a little silent prayer for them. I'm sure many are in a great deal of pain.

It's probably lucky for the other shoppers that I never had to use the cart as I might have plowed into one of them! I could just imagine running into a tall stack of cans and causing some sort of catastrophe!

I hope you feel better after some rest!
Suzanne :-)

Re: Little red wagon

J. King on 6/18/02 at 08:29 (087879)

Suzanne D

Thanks. My foot problems get slightly better and slightly worse depending on activity level. The baseline is that they have hurt for years and restrict my activity. I am going to ankel and foot surgeon soon to ask about ESWT and other options. My main concern is not to make it worse. Then I would be truly disabled in a big way.

Re: Little red wagon

Kathy G on 6/18/02 at 08:49 (087884)

There was an article in the Boston Globe this morning that is particularly appropriate for you to consider. Donald Murray, who used to be head of the University of NH English department, writes a weekly column, called Now and Then, from his home in Durham, NH (the campus of the university). He is, I believe, 81 and his wife is slightly younger. Anyway, his wife, whom I feel like I've known for years, is named Minnie Mae. She is a particularly independent old gal who unfortunately has Parkinson's Disease which has been worsening of late. This week he writes that she finally has broken down and started using a cane in public. He writes that he views this as a demonstration of her independence since it allows her to continue to do what she has always done!

So your little red wagon just allowed you to independently shop (and mow down a few people!) instead of just sitting at home or having to seek out help from other people!

I hope the Specialist you see is able to give you some relief. In the meantime, don't feel funny about those carts!

Re: Little red wagon

Rachel W. on 6/18/02 at 13:36 (087918)

I live in England and fortunately my husband does the shopping but I must admit I do miss going either with him or on my own, and also going into Town. I haven't had the courage to use any sort of cart or wagon or wheelchair even though Tesco's provide them. I'm sure I will have to sooner or later. I can't hide myself away forever.

Re: Little red wagon

J. King on 6/18/02 at 15:32 (087925)

I have some other injuries and they and the PF have disabled me out of work. I am getting enough money so far from retirement and work comp. but I would give anything to be able to work again and make a decent living like I was before I got disabled. I have a hard time being disabled. I was active before and now inactive to an extent. The psychological component that most people work and those of us who can't are somewhat alienated from the rest of society. Maybe this is just my guilt feelings about being disabled but I don't think so.

Re: Little red wagon

Kathy G on 6/18/02 at 20:25 (087952)

Oh yes, I believe that for a man, especially, society definitely makes you feel like an outcase if you don't work, even though you certainly didn't stop by choice. I find, even as a woman who worked only part-time in the first place, people are somewhat judgemental about the fact that since I gave up my 'standing-up' job, I haven't found a 'sitting-down' job. In my case, I am searching for a job that will give me the hours that I want so that I can still have time with my husband but it's none of anyone's business, so I don't become defensive.

The problem with PF is that it's not a malady that can be seen. As you said, you look like a perfectly healthy man riding a cart. But I must tell you, even before PF, whenever I saw someone riding a cart who didn't have a visible handicap, I assumed that they had heart-trouble or some unseen problem. You shouldn't feel that people are judging you. I know that's easier said than done but try not to be so hard on yourself.

The psychological aspect of becoming handicapped, as you have, is not to be overlooked. I hope you have some sort of support system in place to help you to adjust to your new situation.

Take care.

Re: Little red wagon

Kathy G on 6/18/02 at 20:27 (087953)

I meant 'outcast' not 'outcase'!

Re: Little red wagon

Suzanne D on 6/17/02 at 16:29 (087829)

That's what the carts are for: to help people continue to shop when it is too hard - for whatever reason - to walk up and down the aisles. You were smart to take advantage of the opportunity.

I never looked down on anyone who shopped in one of the carts, but now I am even more happy to move out of their way and glad for them to have the cart as I know I was close to having to use one myself. These days when I meet someone in a cart, I make it a point to smile at them, and as I pass by I say a little silent prayer for them. I'm sure many are in a great deal of pain.

It's probably lucky for the other shoppers that I never had to use the cart as I might have plowed into one of them! I could just imagine running into a tall stack of cans and causing some sort of catastrophe!

I hope you feel better after some rest!
Suzanne :-)

Re: Little red wagon

J. King on 6/18/02 at 08:29 (087879)

Suzanne D

Thanks. My foot problems get slightly better and slightly worse depending on activity level. The baseline is that they have hurt for years and restrict my activity. I am going to ankel and foot surgeon soon to ask about ESWT and other options. My main concern is not to make it worse. Then I would be truly disabled in a big way.

Re: Little red wagon

Kathy G on 6/18/02 at 08:49 (087884)

There was an article in the Boston Globe this morning that is particularly appropriate for you to consider. Donald Murray, who used to be head of the University of NH English department, writes a weekly column, called Now and Then, from his home in Durham, NH (the campus of the university). He is, I believe, 81 and his wife is slightly younger. Anyway, his wife, whom I feel like I've known for years, is named Minnie Mae. She is a particularly independent old gal who unfortunately has Parkinson's Disease which has been worsening of late. This week he writes that she finally has broken down and started using a cane in public. He writes that he views this as a demonstration of her independence since it allows her to continue to do what she has always done!

So your little red wagon just allowed you to independently shop (and mow down a few people!) instead of just sitting at home or having to seek out help from other people!

I hope the Specialist you see is able to give you some relief. In the meantime, don't feel funny about those carts!

Re: Little red wagon

Rachel W. on 6/18/02 at 13:36 (087918)

I live in England and fortunately my husband does the shopping but I must admit I do miss going either with him or on my own, and also going into Town. I haven't had the courage to use any sort of cart or wagon or wheelchair even though Tesco's provide them. I'm sure I will have to sooner or later. I can't hide myself away forever.

Re: Little red wagon

J. King on 6/18/02 at 15:32 (087925)

I have some other injuries and they and the PF have disabled me out of work. I am getting enough money so far from retirement and work comp. but I would give anything to be able to work again and make a decent living like I was before I got disabled. I have a hard time being disabled. I was active before and now inactive to an extent. The psychological component that most people work and those of us who can't are somewhat alienated from the rest of society. Maybe this is just my guilt feelings about being disabled but I don't think so.

Re: Little red wagon

Kathy G on 6/18/02 at 20:25 (087952)

Oh yes, I believe that for a man, especially, society definitely makes you feel like an outcase if you don't work, even though you certainly didn't stop by choice. I find, even as a woman who worked only part-time in the first place, people are somewhat judgemental about the fact that since I gave up my 'standing-up' job, I haven't found a 'sitting-down' job. In my case, I am searching for a job that will give me the hours that I want so that I can still have time with my husband but it's none of anyone's business, so I don't become defensive.

The problem with PF is that it's not a malady that can be seen. As you said, you look like a perfectly healthy man riding a cart. But I must tell you, even before PF, whenever I saw someone riding a cart who didn't have a visible handicap, I assumed that they had heart-trouble or some unseen problem. You shouldn't feel that people are judging you. I know that's easier said than done but try not to be so hard on yourself.

The psychological aspect of becoming handicapped, as you have, is not to be overlooked. I hope you have some sort of support system in place to help you to adjust to your new situation.

Take care.

Re: Little red wagon

Kathy G on 6/18/02 at 20:27 (087953)

I meant 'outcast' not 'outcase'!