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mreynolds@dscp.dla.mil

Posted by Maureen R on 6/21/02 at 11:12 (088210)

Drs. Davis & Zuckerman have reassured that I can have ESWT even tho I have tarsar tunnel in addition to pain from PF and mainly from a failed endoscopic plantar release. Now I'm looking for some feedback from people who have had ESWT. I've been in great pain for many years & am now handicapped from the failed surgery. I have nerve damage from the surgery. I am on my own & don't have anyone to help me regularly. Even food shopping is extremely painful. I must drive 30 mi/day for my job. I may have car altered so I can drive with left foot. I am concerned about those who have more pain after ESWT; I can't afford to lose what little capability I have now. Anyone want to provide some advise? Thanks alot.

Re: mreynolds@dscp.dla.mil

john a on 6/21/02 at 13:56 (088223)

I've had two ESWT treatments on my right heel with Dr. Z, the first in 11/2001 and another in 1/2002 - about 8 weeks apart. The first seemed to improve me somewhat, but the second made it a little worse. My theory is that the second treatment was being directed more at a nerve, because I had tingling sensations for several months after. I seem to have recovered though and am not in any additional discomfort now, though my original pain remains. Both these treatments were done with Dr. Z's older Orbasone machine. His new Dornier Epos machine seems better by all accounts - it even uses ultrasound to image the area for exact aiming of the shock waves. I have not yet tried the new device, but may soon. I believe there is probably less than a 1 in 30 chance that you will have several months of *more* discomfort after an ESWT treatment, but that even if this occurs, the worsening won't be permanent. And there is a good chance you will improve.

Re: mreynolds@dscp.dla.mil

Pauline on 6/21/02 at 22:42 (088270)

Perhaps my question has to be addressed by a doctor, but I am wondering if there is anyway when delivering ESWT to avoid the nerves in that area. You indicate that you think the waves might have been directed at a nerve resulting in a tingling pain. I'm wondering if the ultra sound on the Dornier can show the difference between nerves and other tissue. Are they visible enough to be able to avoid them?

When I've had ultra sounds taken of my feet, the Radiologist that specialized in reading foot ultra sounds when showing me the pictures didn't point out any nerves so I really don't know if it is possible. I suppose I should have asked at the time, but it never occured to me to ask
him.

Re: mreynolds@dscp.dla.mil

DaveV on 6/25/02 at 15:58 (088424)

I have plantar fasciitis and am considering eswt. Either ossitron or epos ultra by dornier which I have been told is better. My doctor wants to do endoscopic plantar fasciotomy and says eswt is hocus pocus. Please share your responses with me so I can get a handle on the viability of this therapy.

Re: mreynolds@dscp.dla.mil

BrianJ on 6/25/02 at 16:49 (088427)

I had an endoscopic plantar fasciotomy, and I definitely would NOT do it again. Most foot specialists now agree that (1) ESWT is very worthwhile if your pain is focused in the medial area of the PF origin (inside, front part of heel) and (2) minimal incision PF surgery is preferable to endoscopic PF surgery because the former allows the doctor to see the surgical site better. I am not a doctor -- but I can tell you with certainty that ESWT is a legitimate emerging treatment for tendinopathies and non-union bone fractures.

Re: mreynolds@dscp.dla.mil

Pauline on 6/25/02 at 17:52 (088437)

Dave,
Do the Hocus Pocus first. At least it's not invasive and doesn't cut your Plantar Fascia which is the main supporting ligament for your feet. Many people have experienced relief nearing a cure after having the treatment. If your near Canada the prices are much cheaper than in the U.S. if your insurance will not cover the cost.

Remember you can always have your Plantar Fascia cut, but there is no guarantee that you will improve or become pain free. Read the surgery board on this site. Many people who had surgery are now facing other complications, the main one being the surgery weakened the main supporting ligament and now the foot must try to compensate for this loss of support. Your feet are more complicated than you think. Each part is related to the other.

The first reports following surgery while the patient is still in a boot cast always sound encouraging, but follow the posts for a while and you'll begin to notice the pattern that emerges.

It's your choice. My advice is to think of your feet like you would your eyes. If you could medicate from the outside and get good results why would you want to have surgery before you try the eye drops? The same is true for Plantar Fascittis. Try the ESWT first and make surgery your last resort. I guarantee some doctor will always be there to offer it to you.

Re: mreynolds@dscp.dla.mil

Dr. Zuckerman on 6/25/02 at 17:57 (088438)

Hi

We have used ESWT for the past three years. I have many patients that are cured. I have done over one thousand treatments. IF you would like addtional information about ESWT e-mail Dr. Z (email removed). We can supply you with many patients that have been cured by this very effective procedure.

Re: mreynolds@dscp.dla.mil

Maureen R on 7/10/02 at 15:07 (089424)

Dave: Get another doctor; at least a 2nd opinion. And do ESWT before any surgery; do anything before surgery. The surgery has ruined my life. Look at it this way; if you do ESWT & it fails, you can always then do surgery. I still would not recommend it under any circumstances. Good luck.

Re: mreynolds@dscp.dla.mil

john a on 6/21/02 at 13:56 (088223)

I've had two ESWT treatments on my right heel with Dr. Z, the first in 11/2001 and another in 1/2002 - about 8 weeks apart. The first seemed to improve me somewhat, but the second made it a little worse. My theory is that the second treatment was being directed more at a nerve, because I had tingling sensations for several months after. I seem to have recovered though and am not in any additional discomfort now, though my original pain remains. Both these treatments were done with Dr. Z's older Orbasone machine. His new Dornier Epos machine seems better by all accounts - it even uses ultrasound to image the area for exact aiming of the shock waves. I have not yet tried the new device, but may soon. I believe there is probably less than a 1 in 30 chance that you will have several months of *more* discomfort after an ESWT treatment, but that even if this occurs, the worsening won't be permanent. And there is a good chance you will improve.

Re: mreynolds@dscp.dla.mil

Pauline on 6/21/02 at 22:42 (088270)

Perhaps my question has to be addressed by a doctor, but I am wondering if there is anyway when delivering ESWT to avoid the nerves in that area. You indicate that you think the waves might have been directed at a nerve resulting in a tingling pain. I'm wondering if the ultra sound on the Dornier can show the difference between nerves and other tissue. Are they visible enough to be able to avoid them?

When I've had ultra sounds taken of my feet, the Radiologist that specialized in reading foot ultra sounds when showing me the pictures didn't point out any nerves so I really don't know if it is possible. I suppose I should have asked at the time, but it never occured to me to ask
him.

Re: mreynolds@dscp.dla.mil

DaveV on 6/25/02 at 15:58 (088424)

I have plantar fasciitis and am considering eswt. Either ossitron or epos ultra by dornier which I have been told is better. My doctor wants to do endoscopic plantar fasciotomy and says eswt is hocus pocus. Please share your responses with me so I can get a handle on the viability of this therapy.

Re: mreynolds@dscp.dla.mil

BrianJ on 6/25/02 at 16:49 (088427)

I had an endoscopic plantar fasciotomy, and I definitely would NOT do it again. Most foot specialists now agree that (1) ESWT is very worthwhile if your pain is focused in the medial area of the PF origin (inside, front part of heel) and (2) minimal incision PF surgery is preferable to endoscopic PF surgery because the former allows the doctor to see the surgical site better. I am not a doctor -- but I can tell you with certainty that ESWT is a legitimate emerging treatment for tendinopathies and non-union bone fractures.

Re: mreynolds@dscp.dla.mil

Pauline on 6/25/02 at 17:52 (088437)

Dave,
Do the Hocus Pocus first. At least it's not invasive and doesn't cut your Plantar Fascia which is the main supporting ligament for your feet. Many people have experienced relief nearing a cure after having the treatment. If your near Canada the prices are much cheaper than in the U.S. if your insurance will not cover the cost.

Remember you can always have your Plantar Fascia cut, but there is no guarantee that you will improve or become pain free. Read the surgery board on this site. Many people who had surgery are now facing other complications, the main one being the surgery weakened the main supporting ligament and now the foot must try to compensate for this loss of support. Your feet are more complicated than you think. Each part is related to the other.

The first reports following surgery while the patient is still in a boot cast always sound encouraging, but follow the posts for a while and you'll begin to notice the pattern that emerges.

It's your choice. My advice is to think of your feet like you would your eyes. If you could medicate from the outside and get good results why would you want to have surgery before you try the eye drops? The same is true for Plantar Fascittis. Try the ESWT first and make surgery your last resort. I guarantee some doctor will always be there to offer it to you.

Re: mreynolds@dscp.dla.mil

Dr. Zuckerman on 6/25/02 at 17:57 (088438)

Hi

We have used ESWT for the past three years. I have many patients that are cured. I have done over one thousand treatments. IF you would like addtional information about ESWT e-mail Dr. Z (email removed). We can supply you with many patients that have been cured by this very effective procedure.

Re: mreynolds@dscp.dla.mil

Maureen R on 7/10/02 at 15:07 (089424)

Dave: Get another doctor; at least a 2nd opinion. And do ESWT before any surgery; do anything before surgery. The surgery has ruined my life. Look at it this way; if you do ESWT & it fails, you can always then do surgery. I still would not recommend it under any circumstances. Good luck.