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Bilateral hallux rigidus

Posted by Janet A on 8/09/02 at 20:42 (092095)

When my doctor states for the treatment of bilateral halux rigidus, he will remove the bone spurs and clean out the joint, is this an arthroplasty, cheilectomy, or arthrodesis? Has anyone had this condition and had any of the operations and what were their results? thanks very much - Janet A

Re: Bilateral hallux rigidus

Dr. Zuckerman on 8/09/02 at 20:52 (092098)

Hi

This is called a Cheilectomy. This is a fairly common procedure. . As it has been stated before on this board. It is very important to address the
cause of the hallux rigidus. IF the joint is completely damaged then an implant should be considered. If the joint is elevated ( the first metatarsal bone) .then the bone must be lowered to align the joint. Many times the joint can be saved when the first metatarsal bone is placed back into a lowered alignement with a removal of the bone spurs.

Re: Bilateral hallux rigidus

Janet A on 8/09/02 at 21:20 (092099)

How are success rates for cheilectomies? After you had this procedure done, can you use an eliptical trainer or sit down stationary bicycle as much as you want without damaging your joints further? Thanks Agan!Janet A

Re: Bilateral hallux rigidus

Dr. Zuckerman on 8/09/02 at 22:43 (092110)

The sucess rate can be both great and poor. It all depends on the condition of your joint and the position of your joint. IF a cheilectomy is done when it was the wrong procedure then it won't last and further future surgery will be needed. There is a healing period up to twelve weeks.

Don't expect to beable to use your eliptical trainer or bike for at least a few weeks or maybe more. This is surgery on a major joint You will have sutures for two weeks. and pain swelling up to eight weeks.

Re: Bilateral hallux rigidus

Janet A on 8/14/02 at 17:57 (092494)

Hi!

My doctor told me that he couldn't find the cause of the
bilateral hallux rigidus. He says sometimes there is no cause. Is this a perfectly acceptable answer, or should I look for someone who will find the cause? Is the cause really that hard to find?

Thanks,

Janet A

Re: Bilateral hallux rigidus

Ed Davis, DPM on 8/14/02 at 23:15 (092518)

The cause is related to biomechanics but is not always easy to find.

There are many approaches to hallux rigidus --- make sure your doc explains the various alternatives to you.
Ed

Re: Bilateral hallux rigidus

Dr. Zuckerman on 8/09/02 at 20:52 (092098)

Hi

This is called a Cheilectomy. This is a fairly common procedure. . As it has been stated before on this board. It is very important to address the
cause of the hallux rigidus. IF the joint is completely damaged then an implant should be considered. If the joint is elevated ( the first metatarsal bone) .then the bone must be lowered to align the joint. Many times the joint can be saved when the first metatarsal bone is placed back into a lowered alignement with a removal of the bone spurs.

Re: Bilateral hallux rigidus

Janet A on 8/09/02 at 21:20 (092099)

How are success rates for cheilectomies? After you had this procedure done, can you use an eliptical trainer or sit down stationary bicycle as much as you want without damaging your joints further? Thanks Agan!Janet A

Re: Bilateral hallux rigidus

Dr. Zuckerman on 8/09/02 at 22:43 (092110)

The sucess rate can be both great and poor. It all depends on the condition of your joint and the position of your joint. IF a cheilectomy is done when it was the wrong procedure then it won't last and further future surgery will be needed. There is a healing period up to twelve weeks.

Don't expect to beable to use your eliptical trainer or bike for at least a few weeks or maybe more. This is surgery on a major joint You will have sutures for two weeks. and pain swelling up to eight weeks.

Re: Bilateral hallux rigidus

Janet A on 8/14/02 at 17:57 (092494)

Hi!

My doctor told me that he couldn't find the cause of the
bilateral hallux rigidus. He says sometimes there is no cause. Is this a perfectly acceptable answer, or should I look for someone who will find the cause? Is the cause really that hard to find?

Thanks,

Janet A

Re: Bilateral hallux rigidus

Ed Davis, DPM on 8/14/02 at 23:15 (092518)

The cause is related to biomechanics but is not always easy to find.

There are many approaches to hallux rigidus --- make sure your doc explains the various alternatives to you.
Ed