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would a stiff hip be connected to my P.F?

Posted by Ellen J. on 8/18/02 at 22:09 (092866)

I've had P.F. for 3 yrs. and have been noticing that my hip is quite stiff on the same leg that the P.F. started in. I wonder if such a thing could be contributing to the P.F. Does anyone else notice this? Here's what it feels like: If I'm sitting, I can't move my leg out (laterally) very far. Also, sometimes I feel stiffness and maybe a little soreness at the hip flexor insertion point. My gait FEELS normal, so I'm not inclined to think it affects my gait (and therefore my foot) but I don't know. I recently got P.F. in my other foot but that hip doesn't feel stiff, though I don't know what a normal range of motion should be.
I'm not all that old, so I am not sure what it is all about. If anyone has this problem I would be interested to know if a doctor has mentioned that stretching might help. Meanwhile, I plan to gently stretch and see...
Ellen J.

Re: would a stiff hip be connected to my P.F?

Dr. Zuckerman on 8/18/02 at 22:17 (092867)

Hi

Any restriction of motion in any part of the lower extremity could had any treatmencontribute and or cause plantar fasciitis. Have you seen any doctors or t. I would get an x-ray of both my hips.

Re: Thanks, Dr. Zuckerman

Ellen J. on 8/18/02 at 22:37 (092869)

Hi,
I appreciate your reply. I'll go back to the P.T. and check with him.
Thanks!
Ellen

Re: would a stiff hip be connected to my P.F?

Julie on 8/19/02 at 03:04 (092875)

Ellen

Anything that happens in any part of the lower extremity - feet, ankles, knees, hips - can affect the functioning of any of the other parts. Restriction in your hip movement could have been a factor in your PF as Dr Z says. Equally, PF (and any consequent favouring of your PF foot in walking) could have affected the range of motion in your hip joint.

You might like to try these two simple movements to help increase the range of movement in your hips.

As you do them, notice the range and the quality of the movement in each hip, the difference between the two hips, and the changes that take place as you practise over a period of time.

Work on both hips, not just the stiff one. Start with the right.

1.
Sit tall, towards the front of your chair, with your feet hip width apart and parallel.

Place your right hand on your right knee and lift it to hip level.

Take the knee out to the right as far as it will comfortably go.

Don't strain, and don't let the left hip 'follow' - keep your pelvis stable so that all the movement is in the hip joint.

Then move the knee back to the front.

Repeat 10 times. Then practise with the left hip.

You can co-ordinate the movement with your breath. Breathe IN as you move the knee out to the side, breathe OUT as you move it back to the front.

2.
Sit tall as before, towards the front of your chair, but this time with your feet about 18 inches apart.

Place your hand on your right knee and lift it as high as is comfortable.

Then 'draw circles' with your knee. Take it out to the right, then down, then to the left, then up. Make the circles as big as you comfortably can. You're doing a full hip rotation, working the hip joint through its present full range of movement.

Don't let the opposite hip move: keep your pelvis stable so that all the movement is in the joint you're working on.

Do this ten times, then do ten circles in the opposite direction.

Then repeat with the left hip.

Breathe naturally while you do this one - and don't hold your breath.

I hope you'll find these helpful.

Re: Re:hip stretches

Ellen J. on 8/19/02 at 09:34 (092892)

Hi Julie,
I'll try what you mentioned. It will be interesting to see if it helps get rid of the pain and stiffness, as I can't sleep on that side anymore--very strange. It sort of feels like I strained the hip flexor near the insertion point, but I don't know. I'll try your stretches and also ask my physical therapist. This has been going on for awhile so it would be nice to resolve it.
Thanks for all your time in writing out the steps!
Ellen J.

Re: would a stiff hip be connected to my P.F?

Lara T on 8/19/02 at 10:45 (092896)

I've always considered the two issues separate, but I did have a severe round with a tight muscle in my hip a couple years ago. The pain was so constant (not severe, but constant) that I went to the doctor, had x-rays, P.T. etc. Eventually (after several weeks, probably a couple of months), after about 3 trips to the doctor and with stretches, it worked itself out. I felt a twinge in the same place the other day when I hurt my knee and had a funny gait - so I assume it's still a weak spot although i don't notice it much anymore. I was never sure where it came from, but suspected it was from taking a nap in a funny position one afternoon. It is in my leg with the stronger findings on the NCV test.

What's the connection if there is one?

Re: would a stiff hip be connected to my P.F?

Ellen J. on 8/19/02 at 11:01 (092898)

Maybe it does have to do with a different gait (from P.F. or knee problems, etc.) Mine got worse after doing alot of pushing and pulling while putting up a fence. Normally I could never have done that kind of work when my P.F. was at it's worst, but my feet have recovered enough that I can do it mostly pain free now, if I'm careful. I also wonder if the lack of exercise (from having P.F) predisposes us to having other problems when we do anything physical.
Glad yours is better!
Ellen

Re: would a stiff hip be connected to my P.F?

Julie on 8/19/02 at 16:44 (092928)

Ellen

I would almost bet on your hip stiffness being due to your PF-favouring gait. But perhaps you also strained it when putting up your fence! Lack of exercise will indeed result in general tightening up, which in turn makes it easier to strain when we start 'doing' again. That's why it's so important to keep moving through PF - but with safe, non-weight-bearing exercise.

I hope the hip exercises above will help you (they're part of the series of yoga exercises for the joints from which I've several times posted the ones for the feet).

Re: Would hip surgery be a cause of PF?

Jane on 8/21/02 at 16:10 (093117)

I had hip replacement surgery in both hips last year. About 2 months after my last surgery I began to walk on the treadmill thinking I should get some exercise and it would be nice to walk without pain again. Well about 4 days after I started the treadmill ( I started very slowly I might add..didn't go fast or far), I developed sever PF. I haven't been the same since. It has been 7 months and I stretch, ice, take Aleve, bought good new running shoes that I wear all the time but to no avail. I can't help but wonder if my gait changed after my hip surgery causing PF? Any thoughts on this anyone?

Re: Would hip surgery be a cause of PF?

Ellen J. on 8/21/02 at 17:02 (093131)

Hi Jane,
It sure sounds like there may be a connection between the gait and the P.F. I wonder if you had a biomechanical evaluation, could they correct the situation with custom orthotics? Maybe you've already tried all that. So sad, considering you now have new hips, but your feet are messed up. If it's not one thing, it's another, isn't it?
Anyway, your post was interesting to read and my last thought is; if you stretched the muscles, etc. around the hip, would that help? Any chance that the fact that you were laid up for awhile that you could just be very stiff and tight, causing an unusual gait?
Just a thought. I'm going to try stretching and see what happens.
Good luck!
Ellen J.

Re: Re:Jane: hip exercises

Julie on 8/22/02 at 01:11 (093178)

Jane, the two things could be related: it could be that you began walking on the treadmill too soon after your hip ops, and it could certainly be the change in your gait.

Ellen's suggestion to exercise may be a good one, but I need to give you a caution about the ones I posted for her the other day. The hip rotation exercise involves lifting your knee higher than your hip. As you were probably told, when you've had a hip replacement you should avoid doing this. If you want to try the hip rotation exercise, make sure you don't bring your knee higher than your hip: keep your thigh parallel to the floor.

Did you have physical therapy after the surgery, and did were you given hip mobility exercises? If so, it would be best to stick to them. It might also be a good idea to return to the PT with your new problem.

The problem for you is that if PF limits your ability to walk, your whole lower extremity will stiffen up, including your new hips, so you do need to find some way of getting movement into them. If you have a pool near you, perhaps you could use it - not only to swim in, but to do hip movements in without stressing your feet.

Finally, have you seen a podiatrist? If so, what has s/he done, and what treatment has been suggested? If not, I think that you should.

Re: would a stiff hip be connected to my P.F?

Dr. Zuckerman on 8/18/02 at 22:17 (092867)

Hi

Any restriction of motion in any part of the lower extremity could had any treatmencontribute and or cause plantar fasciitis. Have you seen any doctors or t. I would get an x-ray of both my hips.

Re: Thanks, Dr. Zuckerman

Ellen J. on 8/18/02 at 22:37 (092869)

Hi,
I appreciate your reply. I'll go back to the P.T. and check with him.
Thanks!
Ellen

Re: would a stiff hip be connected to my P.F?

Julie on 8/19/02 at 03:04 (092875)

Ellen

Anything that happens in any part of the lower extremity - feet, ankles, knees, hips - can affect the functioning of any of the other parts. Restriction in your hip movement could have been a factor in your PF as Dr Z says. Equally, PF (and any consequent favouring of your PF foot in walking) could have affected the range of motion in your hip joint.

You might like to try these two simple movements to help increase the range of movement in your hips.

As you do them, notice the range and the quality of the movement in each hip, the difference between the two hips, and the changes that take place as you practise over a period of time.

Work on both hips, not just the stiff one. Start with the right.

1.
Sit tall, towards the front of your chair, with your feet hip width apart and parallel.

Place your right hand on your right knee and lift it to hip level.

Take the knee out to the right as far as it will comfortably go.

Don't strain, and don't let the left hip 'follow' - keep your pelvis stable so that all the movement is in the hip joint.

Then move the knee back to the front.

Repeat 10 times. Then practise with the left hip.

You can co-ordinate the movement with your breath. Breathe IN as you move the knee out to the side, breathe OUT as you move it back to the front.

2.
Sit tall as before, towards the front of your chair, but this time with your feet about 18 inches apart.

Place your hand on your right knee and lift it as high as is comfortable.

Then 'draw circles' with your knee. Take it out to the right, then down, then to the left, then up. Make the circles as big as you comfortably can. You're doing a full hip rotation, working the hip joint through its present full range of movement.

Don't let the opposite hip move: keep your pelvis stable so that all the movement is in the joint you're working on.

Do this ten times, then do ten circles in the opposite direction.

Then repeat with the left hip.

Breathe naturally while you do this one - and don't hold your breath.

I hope you'll find these helpful.

Re: Re:hip stretches

Ellen J. on 8/19/02 at 09:34 (092892)

Hi Julie,
I'll try what you mentioned. It will be interesting to see if it helps get rid of the pain and stiffness, as I can't sleep on that side anymore--very strange. It sort of feels like I strained the hip flexor near the insertion point, but I don't know. I'll try your stretches and also ask my physical therapist. This has been going on for awhile so it would be nice to resolve it.
Thanks for all your time in writing out the steps!
Ellen J.

Re: would a stiff hip be connected to my P.F?

Lara T on 8/19/02 at 10:45 (092896)

I've always considered the two issues separate, but I did have a severe round with a tight muscle in my hip a couple years ago. The pain was so constant (not severe, but constant) that I went to the doctor, had x-rays, P.T. etc. Eventually (after several weeks, probably a couple of months), after about 3 trips to the doctor and with stretches, it worked itself out. I felt a twinge in the same place the other day when I hurt my knee and had a funny gait - so I assume it's still a weak spot although i don't notice it much anymore. I was never sure where it came from, but suspected it was from taking a nap in a funny position one afternoon. It is in my leg with the stronger findings on the NCV test.

What's the connection if there is one?

Re: would a stiff hip be connected to my P.F?

Ellen J. on 8/19/02 at 11:01 (092898)

Maybe it does have to do with a different gait (from P.F. or knee problems, etc.) Mine got worse after doing alot of pushing and pulling while putting up a fence. Normally I could never have done that kind of work when my P.F. was at it's worst, but my feet have recovered enough that I can do it mostly pain free now, if I'm careful. I also wonder if the lack of exercise (from having P.F) predisposes us to having other problems when we do anything physical.
Glad yours is better!
Ellen

Re: would a stiff hip be connected to my P.F?

Julie on 8/19/02 at 16:44 (092928)

Ellen

I would almost bet on your hip stiffness being due to your PF-favouring gait. But perhaps you also strained it when putting up your fence! Lack of exercise will indeed result in general tightening up, which in turn makes it easier to strain when we start 'doing' again. That's why it's so important to keep moving through PF - but with safe, non-weight-bearing exercise.

I hope the hip exercises above will help you (they're part of the series of yoga exercises for the joints from which I've several times posted the ones for the feet).

Re: Would hip surgery be a cause of PF?

Jane on 8/21/02 at 16:10 (093117)

I had hip replacement surgery in both hips last year. About 2 months after my last surgery I began to walk on the treadmill thinking I should get some exercise and it would be nice to walk without pain again. Well about 4 days after I started the treadmill ( I started very slowly I might add..didn't go fast or far), I developed sever PF. I haven't been the same since. It has been 7 months and I stretch, ice, take Aleve, bought good new running shoes that I wear all the time but to no avail. I can't help but wonder if my gait changed after my hip surgery causing PF? Any thoughts on this anyone?

Re: Would hip surgery be a cause of PF?

Ellen J. on 8/21/02 at 17:02 (093131)

Hi Jane,
It sure sounds like there may be a connection between the gait and the P.F. I wonder if you had a biomechanical evaluation, could they correct the situation with custom orthotics? Maybe you've already tried all that. So sad, considering you now have new hips, but your feet are messed up. If it's not one thing, it's another, isn't it?
Anyway, your post was interesting to read and my last thought is; if you stretched the muscles, etc. around the hip, would that help? Any chance that the fact that you were laid up for awhile that you could just be very stiff and tight, causing an unusual gait?
Just a thought. I'm going to try stretching and see what happens.
Good luck!
Ellen J.

Re: Re:Jane: hip exercises

Julie on 8/22/02 at 01:11 (093178)

Jane, the two things could be related: it could be that you began walking on the treadmill too soon after your hip ops, and it could certainly be the change in your gait.

Ellen's suggestion to exercise may be a good one, but I need to give you a caution about the ones I posted for her the other day. The hip rotation exercise involves lifting your knee higher than your hip. As you were probably told, when you've had a hip replacement you should avoid doing this. If you want to try the hip rotation exercise, make sure you don't bring your knee higher than your hip: keep your thigh parallel to the floor.

Did you have physical therapy after the surgery, and did were you given hip mobility exercises? If so, it would be best to stick to them. It might also be a good idea to return to the PT with your new problem.

The problem for you is that if PF limits your ability to walk, your whole lower extremity will stiffen up, including your new hips, so you do need to find some way of getting movement into them. If you have a pool near you, perhaps you could use it - not only to swim in, but to do hip movements in without stressing your feet.

Finally, have you seen a podiatrist? If so, what has s/he done, and what treatment has been suggested? If not, I think that you should.