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Planter Fasciitis in both feet

Posted by Bernice M on 8/19/02 at 21:58 (092946)

Hello,
I have been suffering with foor pain since February, 2002.
I have been diagnosed with a large heel spur in both heels of my foot.
The Podiatrist treated it for 3 months with heel inserts in my shoes, this did not help the pain. Finally, I went to see my orthopedic surgeon and mentioned the pain in my feet, he injected cortisone in each heel.
For approx., 1 month, I went without pain until one month ago.
The pain I am experiencing right now is more than I can handle, the Orthopedic foot and ankle doctor stated it is Planter Facsiitis in both feet. He strongly recommended stretching exercises for both feet, he wants to see me in two months if the pain does not subside. I have been stretching my feet as instructed by the doctor for two full weeks, at this time there is NO relief what-so-ever.
Can anyone who has had this debilitating pain tell me something about th is condition and also, how long does it take before the freaking pain subsides? It would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks,
Bernice

Re: Planter Fasciitis in both feet

Carole C in NOLA on 8/20/02 at 02:19 (092961)

Bernice, as you are finding out, unfortunately it seems to often take months rather than weeks before the pain subsides. How long it takes depends on what you do in treating the condition, and some who have not done much at the beginning have continued to have symptoms for years. So, it's important to get started in these treatments as soon as you can.

Stretching is a good treatment for PF, but it must be gentle, non-weightbearing stretches. If your orthopedic doctor has you doing standing stretches at a wall, doorway, or stairs, these may be aggravating your condition and causing you more pain. Some doctors don't realize this. You can find some good non-weightbearing stretches that work by doing a search of these message boards on 'Julie's stretches'. They are really good. Another good stretch was provided to me by my pedorthist. You just sit with your feet stretched out in front of you, and point the toes of one foot towards your nose while holding the knee down with your hands. Hold for up to 30 seconds (work up to this), and then do the same with the other foot. Rotate your ankles gently to relax your feet afterwards. Repeat and do this several times a day, particularly right before you get up in the morning and right before you stand after sitting for a while.

You also need to be icing your feet. Try using a bag of frozen peas for this; that way the ice can conform to the shape of your foot. Don't get frostbite! I like to ice my feet for repeated five minute intervals over at least a half hour, with a minute or so between them so that I don't get frostbite and so that it is not painful.

Don't ever take even one step barefoot, even to shower. Get a shower stool and/or shower shoes for that. As far as shoes go, many of us here feel that Birkenstock shoes have helped our feet to heal, particularly the Birkenstock 'Arizona' model. This is a slip-on sandal. Custom orthotics also can be helpful for some people when used in a good tie-up shoe like a New Balance shoe.

Resting your feet is important, so that they can heal. Cut back on your activities that require you to stand or walk, and if you are running for exercise you need to stop that temporarily at least until you are past this acute stage. Try to avoid standing on concrete. If your job involves standing on concrete, try to use one of those thick rubber mats to cushion your feet or try to get a temporary re-assignment to a desk job until your feet heal.

See if you can get some anti-inflammatory medications from your doctor to help your PF. They don't help most of us very much, but they might help you and every little bit of pain relief is welcome. I take Celebrex, though it doesn't seem to help me really.

Read the heel pain book on this website and study it for more insights on treatments, and read and participate on this message board as you are now doing. Good luck to you and I hope that you feel better soon.

Carole C

Re: Planter Fasciitis in both feet

Necee on 8/20/02 at 08:18 (092971)

Carole has given you some excellent advice.
What type of shoes are you wearing? It is very important to wear good support shoes, and to rest your feet. Inflammation is causing the pain, so you must concentrate on reducing the inflammation. I use a small water bottle filled with water and frozen, by placing it on the floor and gently rolling my foot over it gives me a nice cooling massage.
You should also be taking some type of anti-inflammatory medication, Vioxx works best for me.
Be persistant in your efforts, and don't give up, this is something that isn't going to go away over night. I have been suffering with PF for a year and a half, but I can honestly say that mine is getting a little better.
If you will continue to read from this website, ask questions, and stay in touch with us here, you will find a wealth of information, along with many caring and compassionate 'friends'.
All the best to you, and let us know how your doing.

Happy trails to you...

Necee

Re: Planter Fasciitis in both feet

Barbara J on 8/26/02 at 14:06 (093573)

Dear Bernice,

Your story sounds like my story!! Here are some encouraging words for you, much like the ones I got and it worked for me. After injuring my feet and having pain in both, but mostly the right foot, all I could do is sit in front of my computer and cry. I went to countless podiatrists, spent over a thousand dollars on all kinds of unuseful orthotics. Then I called a friend who told me her friend had the pain for 1 and a half years. What this told me is that it will eventually subside...that it is not a permanent condition never to be healed again. So...what to do? After reading all I could about it, I decided to do EVERYTHING..(everything BUT surgery). I got a night splint (that will allow the ligament to regrow and heal near the heel bone. The pain is caused by chronic detachment of the ligament from the heel bone.) The less you use your feet the better. At night I wore some soft slippers I purchased at Brookstone. Its those slippers that are made from the same material as those Swedish beds (Tempor-pedic). They are nave blue and can be purchased at Brookstones. They relieved much pain for me. This is your time to take it easy. Enjoy reading, taking a class, do things that will take the place of needing your feet. Avoid aerobic jumping activities at this time until your injured feet heal.

Then, I decided to buy a pair of Birkenstock sandals. Took me a week to get used to them. Now they are the best footwear in the world. I never take them off. In the winter I put on a pair of socks over my feet and still wear the sandals! A Godsend!

Next, I tried a food supplement called Reliv. It delivers 100% of your needed daily requirements to provide the building blocks for your body to heal itself. When your body is in need of calcium, it will go to the first vulnerable place....the teeth and the bones. Who knows how many of us are calcium undernourished? Replacing calcium is the first step in the body healing itself. In my case I was able to walk longer distances in less than two months. This meant enjoying a day at the mall or a fair, or flea market without severe pain. Then summer came and once again I could go for walks without the need to sit down every hour and applying ice!

Then winter came. The pain subsided and I decided to go skiing again. After my first day of skiing I was amazed that the pain did not come back. I still continue to take Reliv and wear my sandals. As long as I can ski again, I am happy.

If you have an opportunity to go to a physical therapist, she can show you how to stretch your foot muscles so your heal gets a chance to recover quicker.

I now enjoy rollerblading and cross country skiing, however not without my Birkenstock orthotics. I alternate them for seasonal activities. In summer I put them in my rollerblades and in winter I put them in my cross country ski boots. What a difference! They are 40.00 and worth every cent. I like them better than any doctor ordered orthotic. (I have a drawer full of those and hardly ever use them!)

I hope this brought you some hope and a plan of action for your attention needing feet. This may save you months of recovery from surgery, the expenses of it all, and healing your feet so you may enjoy life again. Good luck to you. Please write if you have any questions, as I can share my experiences with you so you could help your feet!

Take care, Barbara

Re: Planter Fasciitis in both feet

Carole C in NOLA on 8/20/02 at 02:19 (092961)

Bernice, as you are finding out, unfortunately it seems to often take months rather than weeks before the pain subsides. How long it takes depends on what you do in treating the condition, and some who have not done much at the beginning have continued to have symptoms for years. So, it's important to get started in these treatments as soon as you can.

Stretching is a good treatment for PF, but it must be gentle, non-weightbearing stretches. If your orthopedic doctor has you doing standing stretches at a wall, doorway, or stairs, these may be aggravating your condition and causing you more pain. Some doctors don't realize this. You can find some good non-weightbearing stretches that work by doing a search of these message boards on 'Julie's stretches'. They are really good. Another good stretch was provided to me by my pedorthist. You just sit with your feet stretched out in front of you, and point the toes of one foot towards your nose while holding the knee down with your hands. Hold for up to 30 seconds (work up to this), and then do the same with the other foot. Rotate your ankles gently to relax your feet afterwards. Repeat and do this several times a day, particularly right before you get up in the morning and right before you stand after sitting for a while.

You also need to be icing your feet. Try using a bag of frozen peas for this; that way the ice can conform to the shape of your foot. Don't get frostbite! I like to ice my feet for repeated five minute intervals over at least a half hour, with a minute or so between them so that I don't get frostbite and so that it is not painful.

Don't ever take even one step barefoot, even to shower. Get a shower stool and/or shower shoes for that. As far as shoes go, many of us here feel that Birkenstock shoes have helped our feet to heal, particularly the Birkenstock 'Arizona' model. This is a slip-on sandal. Custom orthotics also can be helpful for some people when used in a good tie-up shoe like a New Balance shoe.

Resting your feet is important, so that they can heal. Cut back on your activities that require you to stand or walk, and if you are running for exercise you need to stop that temporarily at least until you are past this acute stage. Try to avoid standing on concrete. If your job involves standing on concrete, try to use one of those thick rubber mats to cushion your feet or try to get a temporary re-assignment to a desk job until your feet heal.

See if you can get some anti-inflammatory medications from your doctor to help your PF. They don't help most of us very much, but they might help you and every little bit of pain relief is welcome. I take Celebrex, though it doesn't seem to help me really.

Read the heel pain book on this website and study it for more insights on treatments, and read and participate on this message board as you are now doing. Good luck to you and I hope that you feel better soon.

Carole C

Re: Planter Fasciitis in both feet

Necee on 8/20/02 at 08:18 (092971)

Carole has given you some excellent advice.
What type of shoes are you wearing? It is very important to wear good support shoes, and to rest your feet. Inflammation is causing the pain, so you must concentrate on reducing the inflammation. I use a small water bottle filled with water and frozen, by placing it on the floor and gently rolling my foot over it gives me a nice cooling massage.
You should also be taking some type of anti-inflammatory medication, Vioxx works best for me.
Be persistant in your efforts, and don't give up, this is something that isn't going to go away over night. I have been suffering with PF for a year and a half, but I can honestly say that mine is getting a little better.
If you will continue to read from this website, ask questions, and stay in touch with us here, you will find a wealth of information, along with many caring and compassionate 'friends'.
All the best to you, and let us know how your doing.

Happy trails to you...

Necee

Re: Planter Fasciitis in both feet

Barbara J on 8/26/02 at 14:06 (093573)

Dear Bernice,

Your story sounds like my story!! Here are some encouraging words for you, much like the ones I got and it worked for me. After injuring my feet and having pain in both, but mostly the right foot, all I could do is sit in front of my computer and cry. I went to countless podiatrists, spent over a thousand dollars on all kinds of unuseful orthotics. Then I called a friend who told me her friend had the pain for 1 and a half years. What this told me is that it will eventually subside...that it is not a permanent condition never to be healed again. So...what to do? After reading all I could about it, I decided to do EVERYTHING..(everything BUT surgery). I got a night splint (that will allow the ligament to regrow and heal near the heel bone. The pain is caused by chronic detachment of the ligament from the heel bone.) The less you use your feet the better. At night I wore some soft slippers I purchased at Brookstone. Its those slippers that are made from the same material as those Swedish beds (Tempor-pedic). They are nave blue and can be purchased at Brookstones. They relieved much pain for me. This is your time to take it easy. Enjoy reading, taking a class, do things that will take the place of needing your feet. Avoid aerobic jumping activities at this time until your injured feet heal.

Then, I decided to buy a pair of Birkenstock sandals. Took me a week to get used to them. Now they are the best footwear in the world. I never take them off. In the winter I put on a pair of socks over my feet and still wear the sandals! A Godsend!

Next, I tried a food supplement called Reliv. It delivers 100% of your needed daily requirements to provide the building blocks for your body to heal itself. When your body is in need of calcium, it will go to the first vulnerable place....the teeth and the bones. Who knows how many of us are calcium undernourished? Replacing calcium is the first step in the body healing itself. In my case I was able to walk longer distances in less than two months. This meant enjoying a day at the mall or a fair, or flea market without severe pain. Then summer came and once again I could go for walks without the need to sit down every hour and applying ice!

Then winter came. The pain subsided and I decided to go skiing again. After my first day of skiing I was amazed that the pain did not come back. I still continue to take Reliv and wear my sandals. As long as I can ski again, I am happy.

If you have an opportunity to go to a physical therapist, she can show you how to stretch your foot muscles so your heal gets a chance to recover quicker.

I now enjoy rollerblading and cross country skiing, however not without my Birkenstock orthotics. I alternate them for seasonal activities. In summer I put them in my rollerblades and in winter I put them in my cross country ski boots. What a difference! They are 40.00 and worth every cent. I like them better than any doctor ordered orthotic. (I have a drawer full of those and hardly ever use them!)

I hope this brought you some hope and a plan of action for your attention needing feet. This may save you months of recovery from surgery, the expenses of it all, and healing your feet so you may enjoy life again. Good luck to you. Please write if you have any questions, as I can share my experiences with you so you could help your feet!

Take care, Barbara

Re: Planter Fasciitis in both feet

Greg G on 3/07/08 at 11:28 (244234)

I think I have the same problem and it does help to hit the stepping machine. I ran 4 miles and did not use the stepper afterwards and later I had severe pain in the heel and bottom of my left foot. 3 day's later I did some biking, running and walking on a treadmill and ran 1 mile on an door track then I used the stepper for about 10 minutes and then soaked in cold water and the put ice cubes in it.
there was very little pain the next day so I am still trying to come up with a cure or atleast be able to run and etc. with this foot thing.

I plan to get some foot levelers and some physical therapy because this has been going on for 1 year but the stepper may be the key..so far anyway it looks promising ? Hope this helps.

Re: Planter Fasciitis in both feet

Dr. Wedemeyer on 3/07/08 at 13:43 (244242)

I highly recommend seeking a provider who has greater experience and offers a more appropriate insole than a Foot Leveler.

Foot pain can be an indication of many different problems and an appropriate diagnosis is indicated. From there your doctor can assess the need for custom orthoses and base the type of materials and biomechanical control based on your foot type and needs.

From what I understand Foot Levelers was purchased by FootMaxx recently. I have never been a big fan of either companies products or methods.