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severity/prognosis

Posted by Dan on 8/24/02 at 06:27 (093394)

I've had PF for about a month. It's persistant (I feel at least some pain every day), but the pain is mild. I stopped running as soon as I realized it was PF, and started wearing running shoes all day. Some days the pain is worse than others, and it comes and goes pretty arbitrarily, but it's rarely bad. It never hurts so much I can't walk. My question: is severity of pain an indicator of intransigence? How good a sign is it for me that the pain is mild? (i'm seeing a pod. on Monday) Thanks.

Re: severity/prognosis

R C on 8/24/02 at 13:21 (093415)

Dan,

I am not a doctor, but I was in your shoes (so to speak) over two years ago. You are very smart to stop the weight-bearing activity to focus on resolving the PF, even if it is mild. As you know from other case histories, a mild case can become debilitating, if the injury is not properly addressed.

When you go to the podiatrist, I humbly suggest that you use it as an opportunity to arm yourself with information. Ask a lot of questions, be keenly self-aware so that you are an active participant in your recovery. Some of the things you will be asked to try will work better than others, and only you can be the judge of what is effective for you.

Good luck--

Re: severity/prognosis

Ellen J. on 8/26/02 at 17:23 (093599)

I will add one more thing..
My P.F. started the same way--mild pain--and I immediately stopped running once I realized what was going on with my feet. I think I could have gotten over my problem much sooner if I had not kept trying to run every 3 weeks or so when my feet felt better. It just perpetuated the problem. The difficulty is that when your pain is mild and your feet start to recover and feel OK, you think you can go out and try a little 2 mile run. Over a period of 3 yrs (and lots of mistakes like that), I went into pretty severe pain when I tried the treadmill (just walking on it). 5 months after that my feet feel pretty good and my nature is to want to go out and run. This time I've learned my lesson and am planning on taking the whole winter to carefully bicycle indoors and get my feet back in shape over a very long period of time. It's really difficult to refrain from exercising vigorously if you love running, but you can get over Plantar Fasciitis if you are careful and choose an anternative form of exercise.. You'll be so happy in the end if you do.
Good luck to you!
Ellen J.

Re: severity/prognosis

R C on 8/24/02 at 13:21 (093415)

Dan,

I am not a doctor, but I was in your shoes (so to speak) over two years ago. You are very smart to stop the weight-bearing activity to focus on resolving the PF, even if it is mild. As you know from other case histories, a mild case can become debilitating, if the injury is not properly addressed.

When you go to the podiatrist, I humbly suggest that you use it as an opportunity to arm yourself with information. Ask a lot of questions, be keenly self-aware so that you are an active participant in your recovery. Some of the things you will be asked to try will work better than others, and only you can be the judge of what is effective for you.

Good luck--

Re: severity/prognosis

Ellen J. on 8/26/02 at 17:23 (093599)

I will add one more thing..
My P.F. started the same way--mild pain--and I immediately stopped running once I realized what was going on with my feet. I think I could have gotten over my problem much sooner if I had not kept trying to run every 3 weeks or so when my feet felt better. It just perpetuated the problem. The difficulty is that when your pain is mild and your feet start to recover and feel OK, you think you can go out and try a little 2 mile run. Over a period of 3 yrs (and lots of mistakes like that), I went into pretty severe pain when I tried the treadmill (just walking on it). 5 months after that my feet feel pretty good and my nature is to want to go out and run. This time I've learned my lesson and am planning on taking the whole winter to carefully bicycle indoors and get my feet back in shape over a very long period of time. It's really difficult to refrain from exercising vigorously if you love running, but you can get over Plantar Fasciitis if you are careful and choose an anternative form of exercise.. You'll be so happy in the end if you do.
Good luck to you!
Ellen J.