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bicycle

Posted by diana on 8/27/02 at 18:20 (093730)

If you are supposed to suffer from TTS and want to bicycle outside, what position is best to keep your feet in? Diana

Re: bicycle

elliott on 8/27/02 at 21:22 (093754)

Some with TTS can cycle, some can't. Some can't even wear shoes. So no hard and fast rules.

What position is best to keep your feet in? Preferably attached to your legs. :-) Seriously, though, I wouldn't advise altering your cycling motion, if that's what you mean, as that's begging for other injuries. Are you a serious cyclist using clipless pedals? If so, I will say that pedals with a lot of float in them (Speedplay) should in theory put less stress on your medial ankle than other pedals. They did for me. But you can't be sure till you try 'em. Such trial and error can be expensive.

----

Re: The bike and TTS

wendyn on 8/27/02 at 21:57 (093764)

i think Elliot is quite right - this seems to be an individual thing.

A few years ago, there is NO way I could bike. It caused an instant flare up. About 2 years ago I started biking at the gym. Just 5 minutes at a time, and my muscles felt like they were going to explode after just that much.

I'm now up to pretty much unlimited biking. I've been biking about 20k to work some days, and last week I added my total about to right around 100k over 5 days.

(Long way from 5 minutes).

The point is, listen to your body and take it gradual. Wear a stiff soled shoe and most people seem to suggest that you pedal with the mid foot. Make sure your legs aren't stetched way down - lower your seat if you need to.

Are you biking right now?

Re: The bike and TTS

KS on 8/28/02 at 08:12 (093790)

Agreed - probably depends on the individual. I had bad PF (_mostly_ gone after ESWT, but now reaggravated by too much stretching). Also seem to have developed a pretty nasty case of TTS over the past 16 months. I can hardly walk or stand, even a few minutes can be painful, but amazingly, have been able to cycle quite a lot. In fact, in my case, I am convinced it helps if I do not push myself too hard. It seems to help circulation and to keep the lower legs 'looser'. My most significant TTS pain problem is a lower leg ache and feeling of extreme tightness, so some cycling can give me relief.

I use stiff-soled cycling shoes - expensive but great for PF sufferers, clipless pedals with some float, and wear my orthotics in my shoes. I'm careful (relatively) on the hills so as not to stress the TT or PF too much. But my mileage has been up as high as 150 mi/wk this summer. Too bad I can't walk around the block :(. Maybe someday..

ks

Re: The bike and TTS

diana on 8/29/02 at 23:41 (093937)

Thanks for all the comments. I'm starting out real slow but I live on a gravel road and have to use alot of pressure before I get out to a better surface. I stopped wearing orthodics awhile back and i think my feet are better without them. Thanks again. Diana

Re: bicycle

elliott on 8/27/02 at 21:22 (093754)

Some with TTS can cycle, some can't. Some can't even wear shoes. So no hard and fast rules.

What position is best to keep your feet in? Preferably attached to your legs. :-) Seriously, though, I wouldn't advise altering your cycling motion, if that's what you mean, as that's begging for other injuries. Are you a serious cyclist using clipless pedals? If so, I will say that pedals with a lot of float in them (Speedplay) should in theory put less stress on your medial ankle than other pedals. They did for me. But you can't be sure till you try 'em. Such trial and error can be expensive.

----

Re: The bike and TTS

wendyn on 8/27/02 at 21:57 (093764)

i think Elliot is quite right - this seems to be an individual thing.

A few years ago, there is NO way I could bike. It caused an instant flare up. About 2 years ago I started biking at the gym. Just 5 minutes at a time, and my muscles felt like they were going to explode after just that much.

I'm now up to pretty much unlimited biking. I've been biking about 20k to work some days, and last week I added my total about to right around 100k over 5 days.

(Long way from 5 minutes).

The point is, listen to your body and take it gradual. Wear a stiff soled shoe and most people seem to suggest that you pedal with the mid foot. Make sure your legs aren't stetched way down - lower your seat if you need to.

Are you biking right now?

Re: The bike and TTS

KS on 8/28/02 at 08:12 (093790)

Agreed - probably depends on the individual. I had bad PF (_mostly_ gone after ESWT, but now reaggravated by too much stretching). Also seem to have developed a pretty nasty case of TTS over the past 16 months. I can hardly walk or stand, even a few minutes can be painful, but amazingly, have been able to cycle quite a lot. In fact, in my case, I am convinced it helps if I do not push myself too hard. It seems to help circulation and to keep the lower legs 'looser'. My most significant TTS pain problem is a lower leg ache and feeling of extreme tightness, so some cycling can give me relief.

I use stiff-soled cycling shoes - expensive but great for PF sufferers, clipless pedals with some float, and wear my orthotics in my shoes. I'm careful (relatively) on the hills so as not to stress the TT or PF too much. But my mileage has been up as high as 150 mi/wk this summer. Too bad I can't walk around the block :(. Maybe someday..

ks

Re: The bike and TTS

diana on 8/29/02 at 23:41 (093937)

Thanks for all the comments. I'm starting out real slow but I live on a gravel road and have to use alot of pressure before I get out to a better surface. I stopped wearing orthodics awhile back and i think my feet are better without them. Thanks again. Diana