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Has anyone had to change the type of work they do?

Posted by Rick M on 8/29/02 at 22:46 (093933)

I have been treating for Tarsal Tunnel for 3 months now after I fell at
work and hit my foot on the concrete. That happen in January, and I kept
working not knowing what I had done. My foot was hurting more each month
until I couldn't take it any more. I finnaly went to the doctor who sent me
for test and found out it was a nerve or Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome. The type of job I do requires me to be on my feet alot. Has anyone had to change
their job because of this. My doctor said I might have to, and I really don't want to have it opperated on if changing jobs would help.

Re: Has anyone had to change the type of work they do?

diana on 8/29/02 at 23:43 (093938)

Yes,I moved out of state so I would have quit working anyway but I miss it and am thinking about going back on a very part time basis. i worked on my feet most of the time when I worked. Diana

Re: Has anyone had to change the type of work they do?

Missy B on 8/30/02 at 09:53 (093972)

Rick,
Although I opted for the surgery which so far has provided 90% relief from my pain, changing jobs was one of the options which my doctor gave me. He told me that I could try changing jobs to one in which I could sit most of the time and also modify my active lifestyle, so there may be a chance this would help you. Having elective surgery is always an individual, personal choice. I am 54 and have only 8 more years to work before retirement. I have a technical, professional job in a hospital lab and spend most of my day on my feet. At my age, I did not want to give up 33 years of seniority and try to retrain for another job, such as a medical secretary, which would allow me to sit most of the time, nor did I want to give up my active lifestyle, which includes horseback riding, travelling, hiking, etc.
You must look at your own circumstances to see what impact - both economical and personal - changing jobs would have on you ( and your family if you have one). For some, this may be the right choice. If you are young, you still have several years to change jobs until you find one which is right for you - or even go back to college or trade school to retrain for a job at which you can sit most of the time. There are several people who post here that are going to Pain Management Clinics and are learning how to manage their pain - a job change coupled with pain management may be right for you.
Please look carefully at all your options before choosing surgery. Get opinions from several doctors if possible - both podiatrists and orthopedists. Ask around - you may be able to find other people who have had TT surgery - find out how much relief it provided them. If changing jobs is a comfortable decision for you, then try it. Even if it doesn't help, it will buy you time in which to search out more options.
Good Luck to you. Keep us posted.
Missy B.

Re: Has anyone had to change the type of work they do?

Lara T on 8/31/02 at 22:30 (094107)

I'm in the process of changing jobs, the biggest reason being TTS. And I've chosen to avoid surgery also - preferring to change jobs and make other lifestyle changes first. I'm not sure I could justify training for yet another career (I've had two so far - one built on the other) at 50 yrs old if it weren't for the TTS. We (this message board) had a brainstorm session several weeks ago on jobs you can do without using your feet. I tried and couldn't find it. Depending on your level of discomfort, I would rule out most professional jobs. Most professionals walk to meetings, walk down the hall to meet with people, etc. Doctors, lawyers & educators (at least K-12, maybe not at the adult level) defintely spend time on their feet. Perhaps accountants & psychologists & engineers could get by with less foot use. It also depends on how many steps you have in a day for your feet. From my memory other jobs included court reporters, sign language interpreters, medical stenographers. I think most secretaries do enough copying, delivering mail/messages, walking in and out of their boss(es) office(es) etc. that it might be a bit much for TT feet.

Re: Has anyone had to change the type of work they do?

Janet C on 8/31/02 at 23:17 (094108)

I kept working on my feet for years... (I was a bartender) ...ignoring the pain as long as I could... and now, I can't work at all. Think about it... it may be better to change jobs, than become permanently disabled.

Re: Has anyone had to change the type of work they do?

diana on 8/29/02 at 23:43 (093938)

Yes,I moved out of state so I would have quit working anyway but I miss it and am thinking about going back on a very part time basis. i worked on my feet most of the time when I worked. Diana

Re: Has anyone had to change the type of work they do?

Missy B on 8/30/02 at 09:53 (093972)

Rick,
Although I opted for the surgery which so far has provided 90% relief from my pain, changing jobs was one of the options which my doctor gave me. He told me that I could try changing jobs to one in which I could sit most of the time and also modify my active lifestyle, so there may be a chance this would help you. Having elective surgery is always an individual, personal choice. I am 54 and have only 8 more years to work before retirement. I have a technical, professional job in a hospital lab and spend most of my day on my feet. At my age, I did not want to give up 33 years of seniority and try to retrain for another job, such as a medical secretary, which would allow me to sit most of the time, nor did I want to give up my active lifestyle, which includes horseback riding, travelling, hiking, etc.
You must look at your own circumstances to see what impact - both economical and personal - changing jobs would have on you ( and your family if you have one). For some, this may be the right choice. If you are young, you still have several years to change jobs until you find one which is right for you - or even go back to college or trade school to retrain for a job at which you can sit most of the time. There are several people who post here that are going to Pain Management Clinics and are learning how to manage their pain - a job change coupled with pain management may be right for you.
Please look carefully at all your options before choosing surgery. Get opinions from several doctors if possible - both podiatrists and orthopedists. Ask around - you may be able to find other people who have had TT surgery - find out how much relief it provided them. If changing jobs is a comfortable decision for you, then try it. Even if it doesn't help, it will buy you time in which to search out more options.
Good Luck to you. Keep us posted.
Missy B.

Re: Has anyone had to change the type of work they do?

Lara T on 8/31/02 at 22:30 (094107)

I'm in the process of changing jobs, the biggest reason being TTS. And I've chosen to avoid surgery also - preferring to change jobs and make other lifestyle changes first. I'm not sure I could justify training for yet another career (I've had two so far - one built on the other) at 50 yrs old if it weren't for the TTS. We (this message board) had a brainstorm session several weeks ago on jobs you can do without using your feet. I tried and couldn't find it. Depending on your level of discomfort, I would rule out most professional jobs. Most professionals walk to meetings, walk down the hall to meet with people, etc. Doctors, lawyers & educators (at least K-12, maybe not at the adult level) defintely spend time on their feet. Perhaps accountants & psychologists & engineers could get by with less foot use. It also depends on how many steps you have in a day for your feet. From my memory other jobs included court reporters, sign language interpreters, medical stenographers. I think most secretaries do enough copying, delivering mail/messages, walking in and out of their boss(es) office(es) etc. that it might be a bit much for TT feet.

Re: Has anyone had to change the type of work they do?

Janet C on 8/31/02 at 23:17 (094108)

I kept working on my feet for years... (I was a bartender) ...ignoring the pain as long as I could... and now, I can't work at all. Think about it... it may be better to change jobs, than become permanently disabled.