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Prescription drugs to rub on where it hurts

Posted by Sharon W on 8/31/02 at 09:20 (094060)

Some topical nerve and pain gels I found with my search, if anyone is interested. These are compounded prescription drugs to rub on where it hurts. The information comes from the following site:

http://www.drugs-r-us.org/treatments.html

Transdermal Gels for Pain

Pluronic Lecithin Organogels are used for transdermal delivery of various medications. Medications most commonly used are anti-inflammatories, muscle relaxers, nerve blockers, local anesthetics, hormones and anti-emetics.

When using anti-inflammatories, PLO's deliver a high concentration of the drug to the desired site. Studies have shown up to 100 times higher NSAID synovial fluid concentrations when compared to NSAID blood levels. It allows for quick onset of action, three to five minutes, while bypassing the gastrointestinal tract for those patients at risk of the side effects most commonly seen using oral anti-inflammatories.

Usually dispensed in 30gm or 60gm tubes.

PRESCRIPTION:

Ketoprofen 20% gel - for inflammation in the joints.

Keto-Flex Gel - (Ketoprofen 20%, Cyclobenzaprine 2%)

Keto-Lido Gel - (Ketoprofen 20%, Lidocaine 5%)

Keto-Cam Gel - (Ketoprofen 20%, Piroxicam 1%)

Ketocyclolido Gel - (Ketoprofen 20%, Cyclobenzaprine 2%, Lidocaine 5%)

Or any combination....

Apply 2 to 4 times a day or as needed to the affected area. Rub in well.

http://www.drugs-r-us.org/treatments.html

PRESCRIPTIONS:

NEURO-GEL

For Neuropathic Pain

Ketoprofen 10% / Carbamazipine (Tegretol)2% / Lidocaine 10%

*Neurontin, Dilantin, or Elavil may be substituted for Tegretol.

Neuro-Gel 2

Ketoprofen 20% / Lidocaine 10% / Amitryptilline 2%

SHINGLES GEL

Ketoprofen 20% / Lidocaine 10% / Deoxy d Glucose 2% / Carbamazapine (Tegretol) 2%

Apply to affected area 3 times a day.

Wash area before each application.

GUANETHEDINE SPRAY

For Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy

Guanethedine 1% / Lidocaine 4%

Apply to painful area 2 to 3 times daily.

POST HERPETIC NEURALGIA SOLUTION or 'PHN' SOLUTION

Amitriptylline 2% / Capsaicin 0.075% / Lidocaine 5% / Clonidine 0.2%

TRIGGER POINT GEL

Ketoprofen 10% / Guaifenesin 10% / Capsaicin 0.075% / Lidocaine 4%

Apply to trigger point areas 3 to 4 times a day.

Compounds for Neuropathic Pain

Gaba-Clon Gel

Neurontin 6% / Clonidine 0.02%

Apply topically 3 to 4 times a day.

KCL Cream

Ketoprofen 20% / Carbamazepine (Tegretol) 2% / Lidocaine 10%

Ketamine 5% in a PLO

Used for any neuropathic pain, TMJ pain, myofacial pain, fibromyalgia, etc.

Apply topically 3 to 4 times daily.

-------------------------------------

I hope this info will be helpful for someone.

Sharon

Re: Research study results for Clonidine gel (to relieve pain)

Sharon W on 8/31/02 at 09:28 (094062)

Another item I found while I was searching that might interest you and your doctor. (Excerpts follow):

http://www.prnewswire.com/cgi-bin/stories.pl?ACCT=104&STORY=/www/story/03-07-2000/0001158905&EDATE=

BUFFALO GROVE, Ill., March 7 /PRNewswire/ -- Curatek Pharmaceuticals today announced that it has begun Phase III human clinical trials with topical clonidine gel, an innovative treatment for peripheral neuropathic pain, including widespread and frequently debilitating conditions where current treatments are often ineffective.

'Countless numbers of patients today suffer from intractable neuropathic again that not only causes severe discomfort, but in many cases even prevents them from performing basic tasks such as walking or using their hands,' said Dr. Robert Borgman, president of Curatek. 'Based on the results of clinical studies to date, we believe this new approach to therapy offers the potential to become an important solution for a currently unmet clinical need.'

The new treatment is an innovative topical gel formulation of clonidine that has been designed to provide concentrated, site-specific therapy over the complete painful area without blocking motor or sensory nerve function. In initial clinical trials, it was associated with minimal side effects and was found effective where other treatments had failed.

While clonidine has been widely prescribed in oral form or as a transdermal patch for the treatment of hypertension, it has also been shown to act as a potent local analgesic. Because its effect is concentration-dependent, however, the compound does not provide analgesia at the site of pain when administered orally.

Moreover, when delivered via transdemal patch, clonidine produces analgesia in only a narrow band with poor pain relief in areas not covered by the patch. In addition, the systemic concentrations of clonidine produced by the transdermal patch may result in systemic side effects, including dry mouth, drowsiness, fatigue, headache, lethargy and sedation, insomnia, dizziness, impotence, dry throat, constipation, nausea and change in taste.

'The new topical clonidine gel formulation is easily spread to permit the analgesic properties to reach all of the affected painful nerves, while
resulting in minimal blood levels to avoid systemic side effects,' Dr. Borgman said. 'Although its precise mechanism of action is unknown, it is believed that site-specific concentrations of clonidine may decrease the local release of norepinephrine, an agent that stimulates sensitized nerve fibers to cause painful sensations.'

Re: Like JohnH, I've tried it all !

BrianG on 8/31/02 at 19:24 (094091)

Hi Sharon,

I like the idea behind compounded meds, and have even tried some myself. IFor my case of PF, it did not work. I know they are quite popular in other parts of the world, but not here in the US. From what I found, most insurance companies will not cover compound meds. They are expensive, plus you have to find a doctor who knows how to prescribe them (another bill, with no insurance coverage). If anyone has the money, go for it. If you have to pay out of your pocket, and finances are tight, I'd think twice about them. Good luck

BrianG

PS: Lots of info on the search engines. Thats how I got mine.

Re: Compounded meds

Sharon W on 9/01/02 at 00:00 (094110)

Brian,

Yes, I realize that compounded prescription medicines are more expensive, and very few of those gels to rub on the skin are routinely available in the U.S.

But medications that you rub onto the skin usually don't have as many serious side effects, and almost never cause stomach problems. I think that's a VERY important thing to consider. And many of us do spend big bucks on treatments and products to help with our foot problems that are NOT covered by our insurance.

Don't get me wrong -- I'm not criticizing anyone for buying foot-healthy shoes -- but it IS easy to spend as much for (yet another) pair of shoes, as for a tube of compounded prescription gel to relieve pain. (Of course, the gel might not work -- but that's also true of the shoes!!)

Sharon

Re: Compounded meds

RalphP on 9/01/02 at 20:23 (094166)

Here's another vote in support of topical gels and creams. I can no longer take oral NSAIDs due to stomach problems. I'm currently using ibuprofen gel, an OTC product but ordered from England. It doesn't cure anything, but it certainly seems to get me some relief. I appreciated Sharon's info on a source for compounded drugs. Something to try if the ibuprofen gel stops working.

Re: Research study results for Clonidine gel (to relieve pain)

Sharon W on 8/31/02 at 09:28 (094062)

Another item I found while I was searching that might interest you and your doctor. (Excerpts follow):

http://www.prnewswire.com/cgi-bin/stories.pl?ACCT=104&STORY=/www/story/03-07-2000/0001158905&EDATE=

BUFFALO GROVE, Ill., March 7 /PRNewswire/ -- Curatek Pharmaceuticals today announced that it has begun Phase III human clinical trials with topical clonidine gel, an innovative treatment for peripheral neuropathic pain, including widespread and frequently debilitating conditions where current treatments are often ineffective.

'Countless numbers of patients today suffer from intractable neuropathic again that not only causes severe discomfort, but in many cases even prevents them from performing basic tasks such as walking or using their hands,' said Dr. Robert Borgman, president of Curatek. 'Based on the results of clinical studies to date, we believe this new approach to therapy offers the potential to become an important solution for a currently unmet clinical need.'

The new treatment is an innovative topical gel formulation of clonidine that has been designed to provide concentrated, site-specific therapy over the complete painful area without blocking motor or sensory nerve function. In initial clinical trials, it was associated with minimal side effects and was found effective where other treatments had failed.

While clonidine has been widely prescribed in oral form or as a transdermal patch for the treatment of hypertension, it has also been shown to act as a potent local analgesic. Because its effect is concentration-dependent, however, the compound does not provide analgesia at the site of pain when administered orally.

Moreover, when delivered via transdemal patch, clonidine produces analgesia in only a narrow band with poor pain relief in areas not covered by the patch. In addition, the systemic concentrations of clonidine produced by the transdermal patch may result in systemic side effects, including dry mouth, drowsiness, fatigue, headache, lethargy and sedation, insomnia, dizziness, impotence, dry throat, constipation, nausea and change in taste.

'The new topical clonidine gel formulation is easily spread to permit the analgesic properties to reach all of the affected painful nerves, while
resulting in minimal blood levels to avoid systemic side effects,' Dr. Borgman said. 'Although its precise mechanism of action is unknown, it is believed that site-specific concentrations of clonidine may decrease the local release of norepinephrine, an agent that stimulates sensitized nerve fibers to cause painful sensations.'

Re: Like JohnH, I've tried it all !

BrianG on 8/31/02 at 19:24 (094091)

Hi Sharon,

I like the idea behind compounded meds, and have even tried some myself. IFor my case of PF, it did not work. I know they are quite popular in other parts of the world, but not here in the US. From what I found, most insurance companies will not cover compound meds. They are expensive, plus you have to find a doctor who knows how to prescribe them (another bill, with no insurance coverage). If anyone has the money, go for it. If you have to pay out of your pocket, and finances are tight, I'd think twice about them. Good luck

BrianG

PS: Lots of info on the search engines. Thats how I got mine.

Re: Compounded meds

Sharon W on 9/01/02 at 00:00 (094110)

Brian,

Yes, I realize that compounded prescription medicines are more expensive, and very few of those gels to rub on the skin are routinely available in the U.S.

But medications that you rub onto the skin usually don't have as many serious side effects, and almost never cause stomach problems. I think that's a VERY important thing to consider. And many of us do spend big bucks on treatments and products to help with our foot problems that are NOT covered by our insurance.

Don't get me wrong -- I'm not criticizing anyone for buying foot-healthy shoes -- but it IS easy to spend as much for (yet another) pair of shoes, as for a tube of compounded prescription gel to relieve pain. (Of course, the gel might not work -- but that's also true of the shoes!!)

Sharon

Re: Compounded meds

RalphP on 9/01/02 at 20:23 (094166)

Here's another vote in support of topical gels and creams. I can no longer take oral NSAIDs due to stomach problems. I'm currently using ibuprofen gel, an OTC product but ordered from England. It doesn't cure anything, but it certainly seems to get me some relief. I appreciated Sharon's info on a source for compounded drugs. Something to try if the ibuprofen gel stops working.