Home The Book Dr Articles Products Message Boards Journal Articles Search Our Surveys Surgery ESWT Dr Messages Find Good Drs video

Click in my foot when I walk

Posted by Edna I on 9/02/02 at 10:45 (094214)

About a week ago my foot started clicking constantly when I walk. If I hold my foot stiff and don't bend it, it doesn't click as much. I have had PF since May. Two weeks ago I thought I was better and would be back on the tennis courts by October. I am now in so much pain when I walk I actually had to use the handicapped cart in the grocery store!! Has this ever happened to anyone....and do you have any suggestions to relieve the pain. I take 20 mg of Bextra. It seemed to work great at first, but now I don't know....

Re: Click in my foot when I walk

Carole C in NOLA on 9/02/02 at 13:02 (094233)

Edna, I notice that nobody has responded to your question, and I think that your clicking may be an unusual symptom!

I have had clicking in my ankles since I was a very little girl. It used to bother me then, because I could not sneak downstairs after bedtime or go anywhere undetected... people would hear my ankles clicking.

However, I've never had my FEET click like that, not even with PF. There are joints in the feet, so I guess it is reasonable that foot joints could click just as easily as ankle joints.

PF itself can be very painful when it is at its worst, and a substantial number of the 'regulars' here have used the handicapped cart in the grocery store at some time, or have wished that they could bring themselves to do so. Anti-inflammatories may help a little, but really they do not help the pain as much as some other conservative treatments that you can do.

Have you read the heel pain book on this site? It's a good starting point (and a good refresher, if you already know about such treatments). Some of the many things that have helped people on this site are ice, rest, custom orthotics, Birkenstock shoes, and gentle non-weightbearing stretching. Some good stretches for PF are described in a post by Julie, and here's a link to it: bbv.cgi?n=91080

The rest of this post is what I'd tell anyone with severe pain from PF that they have acquired in the past few months. It's what has worked for me. I got PF less than a year ago, and I'm pretty much completely healed at this point.

I'd suggest first of all, stay off your feet as much as possible. If possible don't go to the grocery store at all, and just survive on what you have or what can be delivered or obtained from a drive-through. At home, stay off your feet rather than doing housework. Don't stand to do dishes; maybe you can use paper plates and cups. Don't lift a basket of laundry (I used to drag my laundry basket with a rope). If you have to work on your feet, try to get a temporary re-assignment to a desk job. Until your PF pain is at a more reasonable level, I'd strongly suggest you stop all exercising just to protect your feet even more. Don't worry about getting out of shape. You will, and you will have to rebuild your muscles, but that only takes a few weeks once you are better if you approach it gradually. Believe me, it's worth a few extra weeks of conditioning if you can get rid of PF this way.

Secondly, do Julie's stretches that I mentioned above. Don't do anything that hurts. If they hurt, do them more gently. Repeat them several times each day as you get used to doing them.

Third, ICE. Use a bag of frozen peas or other vegetables, that can conform to the shape of your foot. Put your foot on it for a few minutes until it becomes uncomfortable. Then take it off (so you don't get frostbite) until you can comfortably repeat it, and keep this up for a half hour. For me, it's about 5 minutes on the ice and 1-2 minutes off, and repeated. Do the half hour icing a couple of times a day, or maybe three if you are in a lot of pain.

Fourth, get some Birkenstock Arizonas. There are many places online that sell them, and I got mine at http://www.birkenstockexpress.com . Arizonas are the most popular among PF sufferers. Birkenstocks must be broken in gradually... an hour the first day, and increase the time by an hour or half hour each day for the first week or two. Always wear your Birkenstocks around the house, or if you get up in the night to use the restroom.

Fifth, get a height-adjustable shower stool at your medical supply store and adjust it to the right height for you. Also, you may want to get waterproof shower shoes. The idea of all this is so that you don't stand barefoot in the shower. In fact, don't EVER stand barefoot, or take even one step barefoot, whether you are in the shower or not. Not even when you are dressing.

Sixth, ask your podiatrist about custom orthotics. They are expensive but the soft custom orthotics can be very helpful for PF. Ask him what shoes he wants you to wear, and have the orthotics fit to that shoe.

And last of all, keep reading these message boards and participating here. It's amazing what a person can learn from others with PF who post here.

Good luck, and let us know how it goes.

Carole C

Re: P.S.

Carole C in NOLA on 9/02/02 at 13:08 (094235)

Edna, I should make it clear that I am a fellow PF sufferer, and not a foot professional of any kind. I hope one will respond to your post eventually, though!

Carole C

Re: another one to bookmark, Carole...

Suzanne D on 9/03/02 at 15:56 (094373)

Such great advice and told so well...I think it would be great for you to bookmark this and make a link to it like you did to Julie's stretches. Maybe call it 'Carole's advice' or something like that. It seems that this would be a good one to repeat whenever needed!

As for Edna, I am sorry that I don't have a suggestion about the clicking problem. What does your doctor say?

Suzanne

Re: Click in my foot when I walk

Carole C in NOLA on 9/02/02 at 13:02 (094233)

Edna, I notice that nobody has responded to your question, and I think that your clicking may be an unusual symptom!

I have had clicking in my ankles since I was a very little girl. It used to bother me then, because I could not sneak downstairs after bedtime or go anywhere undetected... people would hear my ankles clicking.

However, I've never had my FEET click like that, not even with PF. There are joints in the feet, so I guess it is reasonable that foot joints could click just as easily as ankle joints.

PF itself can be very painful when it is at its worst, and a substantial number of the 'regulars' here have used the handicapped cart in the grocery store at some time, or have wished that they could bring themselves to do so. Anti-inflammatories may help a little, but really they do not help the pain as much as some other conservative treatments that you can do.

Have you read the heel pain book on this site? It's a good starting point (and a good refresher, if you already know about such treatments). Some of the many things that have helped people on this site are ice, rest, custom orthotics, Birkenstock shoes, and gentle non-weightbearing stretching. Some good stretches for PF are described in a post by Julie, and here's a link to it: bbv.cgi?n=91080

The rest of this post is what I'd tell anyone with severe pain from PF that they have acquired in the past few months. It's what has worked for me. I got PF less than a year ago, and I'm pretty much completely healed at this point.

I'd suggest first of all, stay off your feet as much as possible. If possible don't go to the grocery store at all, and just survive on what you have or what can be delivered or obtained from a drive-through. At home, stay off your feet rather than doing housework. Don't stand to do dishes; maybe you can use paper plates and cups. Don't lift a basket of laundry (I used to drag my laundry basket with a rope). If you have to work on your feet, try to get a temporary re-assignment to a desk job. Until your PF pain is at a more reasonable level, I'd strongly suggest you stop all exercising just to protect your feet even more. Don't worry about getting out of shape. You will, and you will have to rebuild your muscles, but that only takes a few weeks once you are better if you approach it gradually. Believe me, it's worth a few extra weeks of conditioning if you can get rid of PF this way.

Secondly, do Julie's stretches that I mentioned above. Don't do anything that hurts. If they hurt, do them more gently. Repeat them several times each day as you get used to doing them.

Third, ICE. Use a bag of frozen peas or other vegetables, that can conform to the shape of your foot. Put your foot on it for a few minutes until it becomes uncomfortable. Then take it off (so you don't get frostbite) until you can comfortably repeat it, and keep this up for a half hour. For me, it's about 5 minutes on the ice and 1-2 minutes off, and repeated. Do the half hour icing a couple of times a day, or maybe three if you are in a lot of pain.

Fourth, get some Birkenstock Arizonas. There are many places online that sell them, and I got mine at http://www.birkenstockexpress.com . Arizonas are the most popular among PF sufferers. Birkenstocks must be broken in gradually... an hour the first day, and increase the time by an hour or half hour each day for the first week or two. Always wear your Birkenstocks around the house, or if you get up in the night to use the restroom.

Fifth, get a height-adjustable shower stool at your medical supply store and adjust it to the right height for you. Also, you may want to get waterproof shower shoes. The idea of all this is so that you don't stand barefoot in the shower. In fact, don't EVER stand barefoot, or take even one step barefoot, whether you are in the shower or not. Not even when you are dressing.

Sixth, ask your podiatrist about custom orthotics. They are expensive but the soft custom orthotics can be very helpful for PF. Ask him what shoes he wants you to wear, and have the orthotics fit to that shoe.

And last of all, keep reading these message boards and participating here. It's amazing what a person can learn from others with PF who post here.

Good luck, and let us know how it goes.

Carole C

Re: P.S.

Carole C in NOLA on 9/02/02 at 13:08 (094235)

Edna, I should make it clear that I am a fellow PF sufferer, and not a foot professional of any kind. I hope one will respond to your post eventually, though!

Carole C

Re: another one to bookmark, Carole...

Suzanne D on 9/03/02 at 15:56 (094373)

Such great advice and told so well...I think it would be great for you to bookmark this and make a link to it like you did to Julie's stretches. Maybe call it 'Carole's advice' or something like that. It seems that this would be a good one to repeat whenever needed!

As for Edna, I am sorry that I don't have a suggestion about the clicking problem. What does your doctor say?

Suzanne