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What are the symptons of tendenitis?

Posted by Edna I on 9/02/02 at 11:07 (094217)

What are the symptoms of tendenitis?

Re: What are the symptons of tendenitis?

F.H. on 9/03/02 at 08:51 (094332)

Tendonitis

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Tendonitis is an inflammation of the strong, white fibrous tissues that connect muscles to bones. This tissue is called a tendon. Tendonitis can be associated with a calcium deposit, which can cause inflammation. It is one of the common causes of acute pain in the shoulder and can occur after an injury, or as a result of one movement repeated over and over. In rare cases, it may also result from a disease.

Other causes of tendonitis include:

poorly-fitted shoes that rub against foot tendons,
bone spurs in the feet or elsewhere that irritate tendons,
obesity, which puts abnormal pressure on the legs and feet,
repeated overuse of the wrist, which can inflame the tendons,
overuse of the tendons in the shoulder, sometimes seen in swimmers
or in the serving arm of a tennis player, and
overuse of arm muscles, which can cause inflammation of tendons in the elbow, commonly called tennis elbow.
Tendonitis usually causes one or more of the following symptoms:
a sharp or achy pain,
tenderness and swelling,
restricted movement in the area surrounding the injury, or
weakness in the arm or leg due to pain.
With Achilles tendonitis, if the tendon becomes more painful with greater activity like running or playing sports there is a chance the tendon could rupture.
The following home care tips are recommended immediately after an injury occurs, or at the first sign of pain:

strict rest of the affected area,
application of ice to reduce swelling for the first 24 to 48 hours,
after 48 hours, try applying of moist heat for deep muscle relaxation, and
try an over-the-counter, anti-inflammatory pain reliever like aspirin or ibuprofen, such as Advil or Motrin. It is best to take these medications with milk, food, or antacids to protect the stomach. Children and teenagers should not take aspirin as aspirin use in these age groups has been linked to a rare but serious brain and liver disorder called Reye's syndrome.
If you are allergic to aspirin or your stomach cannot tolerate ibuprofin, the aspirin substitute tylenol can be of some benefit, although it is less effective for this situation.
Pregnant women should consult their physician prior to taking any over-the-counter medication. Other people, including those with medical conditions are advised to read product labels carefully and consult a pharmacist if they have questions about use.

If not taken care of, tendonitis can weaken tendons, making them more susceptible to a tear.

Acute tendonitis often subsides within 10 to 14 days. If the pain continues after home care for 14 days, or worsens, a doctor should be consulted.

After a doctor's evaluation, the following treatment may be suggested:

physical therapy,
weight loss,
shoe inserts,
anti-inflammatory drugs,
ultrasound treatment to reduce pain an swelling,
an injection of medication to decrease inflammation near the injury, or
in extreme cases, surgery to repair the tendon.
To prevent overuse injuries that lead to tendonitis, try these guidelines during exercise or other activities:
gradually build up the intensity and frequency of exercise,
warm up and cool down before and after exercise,
choose shoes that fit properly,
if you sit at a desk for many hours, make sure you change your
position and posture to reduce stress to one area, pace yourself, and
take frequent breaks.

Re: What are the symptons of tendenitis?

F.H. on 9/03/02 at 08:51 (094332)

Tendonitis

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Tendonitis is an inflammation of the strong, white fibrous tissues that connect muscles to bones. This tissue is called a tendon. Tendonitis can be associated with a calcium deposit, which can cause inflammation. It is one of the common causes of acute pain in the shoulder and can occur after an injury, or as a result of one movement repeated over and over. In rare cases, it may also result from a disease.

Other causes of tendonitis include:

poorly-fitted shoes that rub against foot tendons,
bone spurs in the feet or elsewhere that irritate tendons,
obesity, which puts abnormal pressure on the legs and feet,
repeated overuse of the wrist, which can inflame the tendons,
overuse of the tendons in the shoulder, sometimes seen in swimmers
or in the serving arm of a tennis player, and
overuse of arm muscles, which can cause inflammation of tendons in the elbow, commonly called tennis elbow.
Tendonitis usually causes one or more of the following symptoms:
a sharp or achy pain,
tenderness and swelling,
restricted movement in the area surrounding the injury, or
weakness in the arm or leg due to pain.
With Achilles tendonitis, if the tendon becomes more painful with greater activity like running or playing sports there is a chance the tendon could rupture.
The following home care tips are recommended immediately after an injury occurs, or at the first sign of pain:

strict rest of the affected area,
application of ice to reduce swelling for the first 24 to 48 hours,
after 48 hours, try applying of moist heat for deep muscle relaxation, and
try an over-the-counter, anti-inflammatory pain reliever like aspirin or ibuprofen, such as Advil or Motrin. It is best to take these medications with milk, food, or antacids to protect the stomach. Children and teenagers should not take aspirin as aspirin use in these age groups has been linked to a rare but serious brain and liver disorder called Reye's syndrome.
If you are allergic to aspirin or your stomach cannot tolerate ibuprofin, the aspirin substitute tylenol can be of some benefit, although it is less effective for this situation.
Pregnant women should consult their physician prior to taking any over-the-counter medication. Other people, including those with medical conditions are advised to read product labels carefully and consult a pharmacist if they have questions about use.

If not taken care of, tendonitis can weaken tendons, making them more susceptible to a tear.

Acute tendonitis often subsides within 10 to 14 days. If the pain continues after home care for 14 days, or worsens, a doctor should be consulted.

After a doctor's evaluation, the following treatment may be suggested:

physical therapy,
weight loss,
shoe inserts,
anti-inflammatory drugs,
ultrasound treatment to reduce pain an swelling,
an injection of medication to decrease inflammation near the injury, or
in extreme cases, surgery to repair the tendon.
To prevent overuse injuries that lead to tendonitis, try these guidelines during exercise or other activities:
gradually build up the intensity and frequency of exercise,
warm up and cool down before and after exercise,
choose shoes that fit properly,
if you sit at a desk for many hours, make sure you change your
position and posture to reduce stress to one area, pace yourself, and
take frequent breaks.