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Causes Insertional Tendonitis after hagulands surgery

Posted by Gail R on 9/18/02 at 23:03 (095683)

The so called pump bump in my case was not caused by shoes as the name suggest. My doctor said mine was more of a genetic thing. After surgery for this, then Insertional tendonitis, could this be work related if the foot is in repetitive motion ? I know there would be no way for you to know exactly but would it be possible from constant flexing of the foot in driving a lift for long shifts?? Just wondering !I will have to be out of work for months now due in part to the type of work I do. Any thoughts? I ask my doctor about the ESWT but he said it would not be effective at all for the problem I had. Thanks for any input! Gail

Re: Causes Insertional Tendonitis after hagulands surgery

Ed Davis, DPM on 9/19/02 at 17:57 (095760)

There is some confusion, even in the medical community about problems that occur at the back of the heel bone. The problems are often lumped together as Haglund's deformity or 'pump bump.'

Haglunds deformity is an enlargement of the posterior-superior (top-back) portion of the heel bone ABOVE the area where the achilles inserts on the back of the heel bone. The enlargement is genetic but shoes rub on the area making it worse and often causing an adventitious bursa (fluid sac) to form in response to the rubbing. I would not expect ESWT to provide much help for this.

Achilles insertional calcific tendinitis (AICT) is pain and enlargement AT the area the achilles tendon attaches to the back of the heel bone. This is caused by repetetive, excessive side to side motion at the interface between the achilles and the heel bone. ESWT should, in theory, be helpful for this although the abnormal biomechanics must be addressed via surgery or orthotics.
Ed

Re: Causes Insertional Tendonitis after hagulands surgery

Ed Davis, DPM on 9/19/02 at 17:57 (095760)

There is some confusion, even in the medical community about problems that occur at the back of the heel bone. The problems are often lumped together as Haglund's deformity or 'pump bump.'

Haglunds deformity is an enlargement of the posterior-superior (top-back) portion of the heel bone ABOVE the area where the achilles inserts on the back of the heel bone. The enlargement is genetic but shoes rub on the area making it worse and often causing an adventitious bursa (fluid sac) to form in response to the rubbing. I would not expect ESWT to provide much help for this.

Achilles insertional calcific tendinitis (AICT) is pain and enlargement AT the area the achilles tendon attaches to the back of the heel bone. This is caused by repetetive, excessive side to side motion at the interface between the achilles and the heel bone. ESWT should, in theory, be helpful for this although the abnormal biomechanics must be addressed via surgery or orthotics.
Ed