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EPOS & Ossatron

Posted by rob a on 9/24/02 at 15:25 (096117)

Look at both, Dornier and HealthTronic's web site and see what their response is to the JAMA article. They both published the results of the FDA study and unless I'm reading it wrong, the EPOS study came out with the better results. Yet, HealthTronics is still claiming that Electrohydraulic is better then electromagnetic. I think this shows that higher energy treatments do offer better results then lower energy treatments do. Since both machines offer the capability to perform high energy treatments, the issue is irrelavent for them. The real issue is what does this mean for the Sonocur since it is a low to medium energy machine? If more data comes out that state low energy treatments offer poor results then what future does the Sonocur have?

Re: EPOS & Ossatron

David L on 9/24/02 at 18:29 (096129)

Rob,
This study actually illustrates the point of the importance of using low energy. Please see Sonorex's response on this message board to the JAMA article. From our vast experience in Canada (over 6000 treatments!) it would be impossible for patients to tolerate such energy without anesthesia and having the shock waves focused on the most tender spot. This shows the importance of clinical focusing and having the patient direct the technician to the most tender spot.

Re: EPOS & Ossatron

rob a on 9/24/02 at 19:32 (096133)

I agree that clinical focusing is essential to properly guide the shock wave to the maximum point of tenderness but the article does NOT illustrate the point of using low energy applications for ESWT. In fact, I draw the opposite conclusion from the study. I'm not saying the study proves anything because I think as far as science goes, this is a poor example of a controled study and the treatment parameters and patient selection leaves alot to be desired. My concern for the people using the Sonocur is that this will reflect poorly on anyone using it in the U.S. It may very well be an excellent device but Siemens and/or Sonorex need to find data in the U.S. that will support them. Eventually it all comes down to marketing and sales as far as the market's perception of low energy devices is concerned. If these two companies don't start publishing quality U.S. comparative studies then they risk being marginalized and labeled as substandard because there is no controled data that supports the use of the Sonocur.

Re: EPOS & Ossatron

David L on 9/24/02 at 23:11 (096164)

Rob,
I am certain there will be more studies. Remember that the Sonocur was only FDA approved on the 19th of July so as devices become more widespread,you'll see more studies. There are already 51 locations (according to http://www.sonorex.com) either operating in the US or about to be operating. More are being added all the time.

Re: EPOS & Ossatron

David L on 9/24/02 at 18:29 (096129)

Rob,
This study actually illustrates the point of the importance of using low energy. Please see Sonorex's response on this message board to the JAMA article. From our vast experience in Canada (over 6000 treatments!) it would be impossible for patients to tolerate such energy without anesthesia and having the shock waves focused on the most tender spot. This shows the importance of clinical focusing and having the patient direct the technician to the most tender spot.

Re: EPOS & Ossatron

rob a on 9/24/02 at 19:32 (096133)

I agree that clinical focusing is essential to properly guide the shock wave to the maximum point of tenderness but the article does NOT illustrate the point of using low energy applications for ESWT. In fact, I draw the opposite conclusion from the study. I'm not saying the study proves anything because I think as far as science goes, this is a poor example of a controled study and the treatment parameters and patient selection leaves alot to be desired. My concern for the people using the Sonocur is that this will reflect poorly on anyone using it in the U.S. It may very well be an excellent device but Siemens and/or Sonorex need to find data in the U.S. that will support them. Eventually it all comes down to marketing and sales as far as the market's perception of low energy devices is concerned. If these two companies don't start publishing quality U.S. comparative studies then they risk being marginalized and labeled as substandard because there is no controled data that supports the use of the Sonocur.

Re: EPOS & Ossatron

David L on 9/24/02 at 23:11 (096164)

Rob,
I am certain there will be more studies. Remember that the Sonocur was only FDA approved on the 19th of July so as devices become more widespread,you'll see more studies. There are already 51 locations (according to http://www.sonorex.com) either operating in the US or about to be operating. More are being added all the time.